English as a Second Language (esl) – Grade 3 Unit 3: Moon Light, Moon Bright Third Grading Period – Unit 3 curriculum overview



Download 456 Kb.
Page1/3
Date02.06.2018
Size456 Kb.
  1   2   3
English as a Second Language (ESL) – Grade 3


Unit 3: Moon Light, Moon Bright

Third Grading Period – Unit 3 CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

Enduring Understandings (Big Ideas)

Unit Rationale

Oral and written communication in English is essential in learning about the similarities and differences between the Moon and the Earth and understanding how a folk tale is an old story that tells why something is the way it is.

To promote authentic communication about local government and community change using the second language (L2) through the linguistic domains of listening, speaking, reading and writing commensurate with the student’s level of English.

Essential Questions

Guiding Questions

Listening / Speaking

What do good listeners do?

What do good speakers do?

How do students participate in teacher and student led discussions?



Reading

Phonics

When do we add ing to a verb?

Why do we need to know the connection between the letter and sounds?

Vocabulary

Why do we need to understand the meaning of the words convince, dream, plan, idea, impossible, reach, stretch, and wish for?

Why do we need to understand the meaning of the words mountain, crater, surface, meteorite, spacecraft, astronaut, hill, and valley?


Genre/Text Features

What is a folk tale?

Why does the reader need to know the characters in a story?

Why does the reader need to know (the setting) where a story takes place?

What features are used in an article to give information?

What do text features like maps, headings, captions, or diagrams tell the reader about the article?

What does the heading in a selection tell us?

Strategy

What is meant by the goal and outcome in a story?

What conclusions can we make about what the characters do?

What do we look for when we make a comparison between two things?



Fluency

How should students read grade-level text?


Nouns

What do we know about nouns?

How do we change nouns to show ownership?

What ending do we add to a plural noun?



Why do we need to listen attentively?

Why do we need to speak clearly?

What do we do during a group activity or discussion?

What change do you make to a verb ending in e when adding ing?

What is the sound of the following vowel: long i (i-C-e. igh)?
How can we use the words (convince, dream, plan, idea, impossible, reach, stretch, and wish for) in a sentence?

How can we use the words (public mountain, crater, surface, meteorite, spacecraft, astronaut, hill, and valley) in a sentence?

What are the features of a folk tale?

Who is a character in the story?

Where does the story take place?

What do the maps, headings, captions, or diagrams found in a Science article tell the reader?

What are the events that result from the goal?

What is the outcome after the events occur?

What did we learn about the characters?

How can we change a heading into a topic?

How are the Moon and the Earth alike and how are they different?

What features do good readers display when reading grade-level text aloud?

What words can we use to name a person, place or a thing?

What is the possessive form of ______ (name a person, place or thing)?

How do we change nouns ending in y to the plural form?





TEKS / ELPS (Standards)

TEKS Specificity - Intended Outcome




(1)  Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Phonics. Students use the relationships between letters and sounds, spelling patterns, and morphological analysis to decode written English.

(E)  monitor accuracy in decoding;



(3)  Reading/Fluency. Students read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. Students are expected to read aloud grade-level appropriate text with fluency (rate, accuracy, expression, appropriate phrasing) and comprehension.

(4)  Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing.

(B)  use context to determine the relevant meaning of unfamiliar words or distinguish among multiple meaning words and homographs;



(C)  identify and use antonyms, synonyms, homographs, and homophones;


Student TEKS Outcome

I CAN” statements highlighted in yellow and italicized should be displayed for students.

At the end of each unit, the English language learner will understand (listen), speak, read, or write in English, commensurate with his/her level of English proficiency the following.
Listening/Speaking

I can listen attentively. (TEKS 3.29A)

I can follow directions. (TEKS 3.29A)
I can ask questions. (TEKS 3.31A)

I can give oral directions. (TEKS 3.31)

I can speak about communities. (TEKS 3.31)
Reading

I can pronounce (read) words with the long i: iCe. (ELPS 3A, TEKS 3.1E)

I can read with expression. (TEKS 3.3)

I can name the character in a story. (TEKS 3.7)

I can tell where the story takes place. (TEKS 3.7)

I can explain/describe the meaning of the words convince, dream, idea, impossible, plan, reach, stretch, and wish for. (ELPS 3D, TEKS3.4B)

I can explain/describe the meaning of the words astronaut, crater, hill, meteorite, mountain, spacecraft, surface, and valley). (ELPS 3D, TEKS 3.4B)

I can get information from a photo or caption in a story. (TEKS 3.13D)

I can complete a story map. (ELPS 4D, J; 3.8A TAKS 3)


I can retell a story stating the goal, events, and outcome. (ELPS 4D, J; 3.8A TAKS 3)

I can compare two things and record the similarities and differences. (ELPS 4J; TEKS 3.13, TAKS 2)
Writing

I can write sentences with singular, plural, and possessive nouns. (TEKS 3.22Aii)

I can read and write sentences using verbs ending in ing. (TEKS 3.24B TAKS)





(8)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  sequence and summarize the plot's main events and explain their influence on future events;

(B)  describe the interaction of characters including their relationships and the changes they undergo; and

(13)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  identify the details or facts that support the main idea;

(B)  draw conclusions from the facts presented in text and support those assertions with textual evidence;

(C)  identify explicit cause and effect relationships among ideas in texts; and

(D)  use text features (e.g., bold print, captions, key words, italics) to locate information and make and verify predictions about contents of text.


(18)  Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. (A) write imaginative stories that build the plot to a climax and contain details about the characters and setting;

(19)  Writing. Students write about their own experiences. Students are expected to write about important personal experiences.

(20)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

(A)  create brief compositions that:

(i)  establish a central idea in a topic sentence; (ii)  include supporting sentences with simple facts, details, and explanations; and (iii)  contain a concluding statement;





(21)  Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write persuasive essays for appropriate audiences that establish a position and use supporting details.

(22)  Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)  use and understand the function of the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:

(ii) nouns (singular/plural, common/proper)


(24)  Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to:

(B)  spell words with more advanced orthographic patterns and rules.


(29)  Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)  listen attentively to speakers, ask relevant questions, and make pertinent comments; and



(30)  Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to speak coherently about the topic under discussion, employing eye contact, speaking rate, volume, enunciation, and the conventions of language to communicate ideas effectively.
(31)  Listening and Speaking/Teamwork. Students work productively with others in teams. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to participate in teacher- and student-led discussions by posing and answering questions with appropriate detail and by providing suggestions that build upon the ideas of others.
Figure 19

Reading/Comprehension Skills. Students use a flexible range of metacognitive reading skills in both assigned and independent reading to understand an author’s message. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts as they become self-directed, critical readers. The student is expected to:

(B) ask literal, interpretive, and evaluative questions of text.


English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS)

1)  Cross-curricular second language acquisition/learning strategies. The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:

(C)  use strategic learning techniques such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing, comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire basic and grade-level vocabulary;

(D)  speak using learning strategies such as requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying ideas by defining or describing when exact English words are not known);

(E)  internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment;


(2)  Cross-curricular second language acquisition/listening. The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:

(A)  distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease;

(B)  recognize elements of the English sound system in newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters;

(C)  learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions;






(3)  Cross-curricular second language acquisition/speaking. The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:

(A)  practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible

(B)  expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication;

(C)  speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired;

(D)  speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency

(E)  share information in cooperative learning interactions;

(F)  ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments;

(G)  express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics

(H)  narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired;

(J)  respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.







(4)  Cross-curricular second language acquisition/reading. The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:

(A)  learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words;

(C)  develop basic sight vocabulary, derive meaning of environmental print, and comprehend English vocabulary and language structures used routinely in written classroom materials,

(D) use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text;

(E)  read linguistically accommodated content area material with a decreasing need for linguistic accommodations as more English is learned;

(G)  demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs;

(I)  demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs;

(J)  demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs; and






(A)  learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English;

(B)  write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary;

(C)  spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired;

(5) Cross-curricular second language acquisition/writing. The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:

(B)  write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary;

(C)  spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired;

(E)  employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in content area writing commensurate with grade-level expectations, such as:

(i)  using correct verbs, tenses, and pronouns/antecedents;

(ii)  using possessive case (apostrophe s) correctly; and

(iii)  using negatives and contractions correctly;

(F)  write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly accurate ways as more English is acquired; and

(G)  narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.





Evidence of Learning (Summative Assessment)

Commensurate with the students’ English language proficiency levels (Beginning, Intermediate, Advanced), the students will display evidence of learning by the following:

  • Given the unit vocabulary, students will use the words in oral and written discourse with 80% accuracy.

  • Given essential and guiding questions, students will respond with 80% accuracy.

  • Given a model of correct (grammar) usage of nouns, students will use singular and plural nouns in oral and written discourse with 80% accuracy.

  • Given a series of events, students will complete a story map identifying the goal, event, and outcome of a story with 80% accuracy.

  • Given two subjects in a selection, students will complete a comparison chart identifying the similarities and differences between the two subjects with 80% accuracy.


: admin -> curric -> tsrs -> cg archive -> 2010-11 -> ESL-ESOL
ESL-ESOL -> English as a Second Language (esl) Grade 1 Unit 5: Wings and Things Fourth Grading Period – Unit 5 curriculum overview
2010-11 -> Reading– Grade 1 English Unit of Study: Reading is Comprehending Third Grading Period curriculum overview
ESL-ESOL -> English as a Second Language (esl) – Grade 3 Unit 2: Bloom and Grow Second Grading Period – Unit 2 curriculum overview
2010-11 -> Reading– Grade 1 English Unit of Study: Creating a Climate for Thinking Second Grading Period curriculum overview
2010-11 -> Science – Grade 1 Unit of Study: Measuring Temperature Second Grading Period – Weeks 1 and 2 (6 Days) curriculum overview
2010-11 -> Science – Grade 4 Unit of Study: Exploring the Physical Properties of Matter Third Grading Period – Weeks 1 – Week 2 Monday curriculum overview
2010-11 -> Spanish Reading – Grade 3 Unit of Study: Readers are active and strategic Third Grading Period curriculum overview
2010-11 -> Spanish Reading – Grade 3 Unit of Study: Fostering Independent Readers First Grading Period curriculum overview


Share with your friends:
  1   2   3


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2019
send message

    Main page