English as a Second Language (esl) Grade 1 Unit 5: Wings and Things Fourth Grading Period – Unit 5 curriculum overview



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English as a Second Language (ESL) Grade 1


Unit 5: Wings and Things

Fourth Grading Period – Unit 5 CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

Enduring Understandings (Big Ideas)

Unit Rationale

Oral and written communication in English is essential in learning about how living things grow and change.

To promote authentic communication about changes in living things, people, animals, and plants, using the second language (L2) through the linguistic domains of listening, speaking, reading and writing commensurate with the student’s level of English.

Essential Questions

Guiding Questions

Listening / Speaking

What do good listeners do?

What do good speakers do?

How do we share in a discussion?



Reading

Vocabulary

Why do we need to know high frequency words?

What are some new words we know?

Genre/Text Features

Why do we need to know the name of the story (title)?

Why do we need to know the name of the person (author) who wrote the story?

Why do we need to know who drew the pictures (illustrator) in the story?

What information can you get from the title page? What information can you get from the captions?

Why do we need to know (the characters) who is in the story?

Why do we need to know (the setting) when the story takes place?


Strategy

Why do we need to know the order of events in a story?

What was the sequence of events?

What are the parts of a story?



Writing

What word(s) would we use (oral/written) to complete the sentence frame?

How can we tell that someone is speaking?

Verbs

What kinds of words tell us what someone or something does?



Why do we need to listen attentively?

Why do we need to speak clearly?

What do we do when we talk to others about what we know?

How do we pronounce the new high frequency words? What sentences can we make with the high frequency words?

What is the name of the story/article?

Who wrote the book/article?

Who drew the pictures in the story?

What information do the headings and captions tell the reader?

Who is in the story?

When do you think this story take place?

What events happened in the story?

What words can we use to help us order events?

What happened first? What happened next? What happened last?

What happened at the beginning, middle, and end of the story?

What words can we use (oral or written) to complete the sentence frame?

How do you punctuate what a person is saying


What is an action verb? What is the action verb when it is happening now? What is the action verb when it already happened?

TEKS (Standards)

TEKS Specificity - Intended Outcome





(1)  Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Print Awareness. Students understand how English is written and printed. Students are expected to:

(A)  recognize that spoken words are represented in written English by specific sequences of letters;

(E) read texts by moving from top to bottom of the page and tracking words from left to right with return sweep; and


I CAN” statements highlighted in yellow and italicized should be displayed for students.

At the end of each unit, the English language learner will understand (listen), speak, read, or write in English, commensurate with his/her level of English proficiency the following.



I can share information and ideas with others. (TEKS 1E, 1.27A, 1.28A)

I can repeat words, phrases and sentences I hear. (ELPS 2A)

(F)  identify the information that different parts of a book provide (e.g., title, author, illustrator, table of contents.

(3)  Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Phonics. Students use the relationships between letters and sounds, spelling patterns, and morphological analysis to decode written English. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to:

(H)  identify and read at least 100 high-frequency words from a commonly used list;



(4)  Reading/Beginning Reading/Strategies. Students comprehend a variety of texts drawing on useful strategies as needed. Students are expected to:

(B)  ask relevant questions, seek clarification, and locate facts and details about stories and other texts; and


(5)  Reading/Fluency. Students read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. Students are expected to read aloud grade-level appropriate text with fluency (rate, accuracy, expression, appropriate phrasing) and comprehension.


(6)  Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to:

(A)  identify words that name actions (verbs) and words that name persons, places, or things (nouns);

(C)  determine what words mean from how they are used in a sentence, either heard or read;

(7) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A) connect the meaning of a well-known story or fable to personal experiences, and



(9)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  describe the plot (problem and solution) and retell a story's beginning, middle, and end with attention to the sequence of events; and

(B)  describe characters in a story and the reasons for their actions and feelings;

(10)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and respond by providing evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to determine whether a story is true or a fantasy and explain why.


I can role-play. TEKS 1.28

I can name things around me. (TEKS 1.6A)

I can answer questions. (TEKS 1.20A)

I can track the words in the story. (TEKS 1.1D)

I can read high frequency words. (TEKS 1.3H)

I can use new words in a sentence (oral or written).(TEKS 1.20B)

I can name the title of the story. (TEKS 1.1F)

I can name the author and illustrator of the story. (TEKS 1.1F)

I can describe where the story takes place. (TEKS 1.1F TAKS 2)

I can describe how the character feels. (TEKS 1.1F TAKS 2)

I can answer questions about an article/story. (EKS 1.8, 1.9)

I can put events in order. (TEKS 1.14c)

I can use present and past tense action verbs when I speak and write. T(EKS 1.20Ai)

I can describe how a character feels. (TEKS 1.9B)

I can identify dialogue. (TEKS 1.21C)


I can talk or write about the beginning, middle, and end of a story.(TEKS 1.14C)

I can identify the features of an article. (TEKS 1.14D


(13)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify the topic and explain the author's purpose in writing about the text.

(14)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  restate the main idea, heard or read;

(B)  identify important facts or details in text, heard or read;

(C) retell the order of events by referring to the words and/or illustrations; and

(D) use text features (e.g., title, tables of contents, illustrations) to locate specific information in text.

(18)  Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to:

(A)  write brief stories that include a beginning, middle, and end;


(20)  Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)  understand and use the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:

(i) verbs (past, present, and future);

(ii) nouns (singular/plural, common/proper)

(vii)  time-order transition words;

(B) speak in complete sentences with correct subject-verb agreement; and


(21) Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:

(C) recognize and use punctuation marks at the end of declarative, exclamatory and interrogative sentences.



(27)  Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)  listen attentively to speakers and ask relevant questions to clarify information; and



(B)  follow, restate, and give oral instructions that involve a short related sequence of actions.

(28)  Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to share information and ideas about the topic under discussion, speaking clearly at an appropriate pace, using the conventions of language.

(29)  Listening and Speaking/Teamwork. Students work productively with others in teams. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to follow agreed-upon rules for discussion, including listening to others, speaking when recognized, and making appropriate contributions.

(01.RCS) Reading/Comprehension Skills. Students use a flexible range of metacognitive reading skills in both assigned and independent reading to understand an author’s message. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts as they become self-directed, critical readers. The student is expected to:

(C) monitor and adjust comprehension (e.g., using background knowledge, creating images, rereading a portion aloud);
English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS)

(1)  Cross-curricular second language acquisition/learning strategies. The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:

(A)  use prior knowledge and experiences to understand meanings in English;

(E)  internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment;

(F)  use accessible language and learn new and essential language in the process;

(G)  demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish between formal and informal English and an increasing knowledge of when to use each one commensurate with grade-level learning expectations; and

(2)  Cross-curricular second language acquisition/listening. The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:

(A)  distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease;

(C)  learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions;

(E)  use visual, contextual, and linguistic support to enhance and confirm understanding of increasingly complex and elaborated spoken language;

(F)  listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language attainment;

(G)  understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar;

(I)  demonstrate listening comprehension of increasingly complex spoken English by following directions, retelling or summarizing spoken messages, responding to questions and requests, collaborating with peers, and taking notes commensurate with content and grade-level needs.


(3)  Cross-curricular second language acquisition/speaking. The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:

(A)  practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible;


(B)  expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication;

(C)  speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired;

(D)  speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency; ,

(E)  share information in cooperative learning interactions;

(F)  ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments;

(H)  narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired;

(I)  adapt spoken language appropriately for formal and informal purposes; and

(J)  respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.


(4)  Cross-curricular second language acquisition/reading. The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:

(A)  learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words;

(B)  recognize directionality of English reading such as left to right and top to bottom;

(D)  use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text;

(F)  use visual and contextual support and support from peers and teachers to read grade-appropriate content area text, enhance and confirm understanding, and develop vocabulary, grasp of language structures, and background knowledge needed to comprehend increasingly challenging language;

(G)  demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs;

(I)  demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs;

(J)  demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs;


(5)  Cross-curricular second language acquisition/writing. The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:

(A)  learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English;

(B)  write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary;

(F)  write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly

(G)  narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.


Evidence of Learning (Summative Assessment)

Commensurate with the students’ English language proficiency levels (Beginning, Intermediate, Advanced), the students will display evidence of learning by the following:


  • Given high frequency words or new vocabulary, students will use the words in oral and written discourse with 80% accuracy.

  • Given essential and guiding questions, students will respond with 80% accuracy.

  • Given a story, students will identify the title, author, and illustrator with 80% accuracy.

  • Given a story, students will answer questions about the characters, setting, and the events in the beginning, middle, and end of story with 80% accuracy.

  • Given a model of correct (grammar) usage of nouns, students will use present and past tense action verbs in oral and written discourse with 80% accuracy.

  • Given a series of events, student will be able to retell the sequence using the words first, next, and last with 80% accuracy.


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