English curriculum plan



Download 232.18 Kb.
Page1/4
Date conversion02.06.2018
Size232.18 Kb.
  1   2   3   4
ENGLISH CURRICULUM PLAN


St. Brigid’s National School,

Annacurra.

Introductory statement and Rationale

This policy was updated in Oct 2016 by the whole staff during Croke Park Hours
This curriculum policy was updated by Eva Ryan on 18th August 2011

Updated 26th June 2012 and accepted by the whole staff on 5th Sept 2012. Those in attendance:

A. McNamara, E. Ryan, M.Kirwan, E.Gahan, A.Dolan, C. Cotter, F. Mc Lean

.

Rationale

We decided to review the English Curriculum Policy as part of our on–going policy for review in the school and to insure the plan reflects our current needs as a school community.

.

Relationship to Characteristic Spirit /Ethos of the School

In St. Brigid’s National School, Annacurra, we aim to nurture each child to enable him/her to develop his/her full potential in a caring environment where the talents of each child are valued.
Aims

The aims of the English language curriculum are to




  • promote positive attitudes and develop an appreciation of the value of language-spoken, read and written




  • create, foster and maintain the child’s interest in expression and communication




  • develop the child’s ability to engage appropriately in listener-speaker relationships




  • develop confidence and competence in listening, speaking, reading and writing



  • develop cognitive ability and the capacity to clarify thinking through oral language, writing and reading





  • enable the child to read and write independently




  • enhance emotional, imaginative aesthetic development through oral and writing experiences.


BROAD OBJECTIVES
When due account is taken of intrinsic abilities and varying circumstances, the English language curriculum should enable the child to:


  • gain pleasure and fulfilment from language activity




  • develop the skill of listening actively and appreciate the significance of tone of voice, facial expression and gesture




  • learn to understand the conventions of oral language interaction and use oral language in a variety of social situations




  • expand his/her vocabulary and develop a command of grammar, syntax and punctuation




  • become fluent and explicit in communicating ideas and experiences







  • identify and evaluate the key points, issues and central meaning of a text or oral presentation and organise efficiently the information gained.




  • justify and defend opinions and present a coherent argument orally and in writing




  • use oral language to manipulate images in problem-solving




  • express intuitions, feelings, impressions, ideas and reactions in response to real and imaginary situations through talk, discussion and writing



  • organise clarify, interpret and extend experience through oral language activity and writing





  • explore and express reactions to poetry, fiction and the arts, and refine aesthetic response through oral language activity and writing




  • create, develop and sustain imaginary situations through talk, discussion and improvisational drama




  • compose, relate and write his/her own stories and poems




  • explore, experiment with and enjoy all the playful aspects of language




  • develop print awareness, an understanding of the purposes of print, and a control over the different ways meaning is derived from print




  • develop a range of reading skills and abilities that would include phonemic awareness, word identification strategies and a growing sight vocabulary

  • develop an appropriate range of comprehension strategies




  • develop an awareness of the richness and diversity of reading material available and read from a variety of texts of gradually increasingly complexity




  • choose his/her reading material and engage in and enjoy sustained silent reading




  • develop a sense of discrimination with regard to the use of language and images in the media




  • write for different purposes and different audiences




  • write in a variety of genres appropriate to school and outside needs




  • learn to edit and refine writing and develop a sense of appropriate presentation



  • develop a personal style of writing and learn to distinguish and to use appropriate levels of formality





  • share writing and responses to reading experience with other children and adults




  • use computer technology in learning to write and for information retrieval




  • enhance reading and writing development through the involvement of parents or guardians


ORAL LANGUAGE - INFANT CLASSES

Oral Language: developing receptiveness to oral language
The child should be enabled to


  • experience, recognise and observe simple commands – look, listen, watch




  • listen to a story or description and respond to it




  • hear, repeat elaborate words, phrases and sentences modelled by the teacher




  • use and interpret tone of voice expressing various emotions




  • learn to adopt appropriate verbal and non-verbal behaviour to secure and maintain the attention of a partner




    • establishing eye contact

    • using appropriate head movements, gestures and facial expressions

    • ensuring audibility and clarity




  • mime and interpret gesture, movement and attitude conveying various emotions



Oral Language: developing competence and confidence in using oral language
The child should be enabled to


  • talk about past and present experiences, and plan, predict and speculate about future and imaginary experiences




  • choose appropriate words to name and describe things and events




  • experiment with descriptive words to add elaborative detail




  • combine simple sentences through the use of connecting words




  • initiate and sustain a conversation on a particular topic




  • use language to perform common social functions




    • introducing oneself and others

    • greeting others and saying goodbye

    • giving and receiving message

    • expressing concern and appreciation.


Oral Language: developing cognitive abilities through oral language
The child should be enabled to


  • provide further information in response to the teacher’s prompting




  • listen to a story or a narrative and ask questions about it




  • focus on descriptive detail and begin to be explicit in relation to people, places, times, processes, events, colour, shape, size, position




  • discuss different possible solutions to simple problems




  • ask questions in order to satisfy curiosity about the world




  • show understanding of text.


Oral Language: developing emotional and imaginative life through oral language
The child should be enabled to


  • reflect on and talk about a wide range of everyday experience and feelings




  • create and tell stories




  • listen to, learn and retell a rich variety of stories, rhymes and songs




  • respond through discussion, mime and role-playing to stories, rhymes and songs hears and learnt




  • use language to create and sustain imaginary situations in play




  • listen to, learn and recite rhymes, including nonsense rhymes




  • listen to, learn and ask riddles




  • create real and imaginary sound worlds




  • recognise and re-create sounds in the immediate environment




  • experiment with different voices in role-playing – a favourite story, a cartoon character.



ORAL LANGUAGE - 1st and 2nd Classes

Oral Language: developing receptiveness to oral language
The child should be enabled to


  • experience challenging vocabulary and sentence structure from the teacher




  • listen to stories, descriptions, instructions and directions and respond to them




  • listen to sounds and respond to them



  • become more adept in using appropriate verbal and non-verbal behaviour in order to secure and maintain the attention of the listener





    • eye contact, facial expression, audibility and clarity of enunciation, tone of voice




  • use gesture and movement to extend the meaning of what he/she is saying




  • express in mime various emotions and reactions, and interpret the emotions and reactions or others.



Oral Language: developing competence and confidence in using oral language
The child should be enabled to


  • talk about and reflect on past and present experiences, and plan, predict, anticipate and speculate about future and imaginary experiences




  • experiment with more elaborate vocabulary and sentence structure in order to extend and explore meaning




    • experimenting with descriptive words

    • combining simple sentences

    • elaborating simple sentences




  • experiment with word order and examine its implications for meaning and clarity




  • focus on the subject under discussion and sustain a conversation on it




  • initiate discussions, respond to the initiatives of others, and have practice in taking turns




  • engage in real and imaginary situations to perform different social functions




    • greeting others

    • receiving and giving compliments

    • using the telephone

    • making requests for information


Oral Language: developing cognitive abilities through oral language
The child should be enabled to





  • listen to other children describe experiences and ask questions about their reactions to them




  • become increasingly explicit in relation to people, places, times, processes and events by adding elaborative detail to what he/she describes and narrates




  • listen to a story or narrative and ask questions about it




  • engage in real and imaginary situations involving language use




    • explain, persuade, enquire, report, agree, dissent, discuss a point of view, justify opinions

    • provide solutions to problems




  • ask questions that will satisfy his/her curiosity and wonder – who? where? what? when? why? How? what if?



Oral Language: developing emotional and imaginative life through oral language
The child should be enabled to


  • describe everyday experiences and events




  • express feelings in order to clarify them and explain them to others




  • tell stories in his/her own words and answer questions about them




  • listen to, read, learn and recite a varied and appropriate repertoire of rhymes and poems




  • re-create stories and poems in improvisational drama




  • use play and improvisational drama to sustain imaginary situations




  • listen to and say nonsense words and unusual words




  • listen to, learn and tell riddles and jokes



  • clap the rhythms of poems and rhymes





  • listen to, read, learn and recite more sophisticated nonsense verse and rhymes




  • recognise and re-create sounds in the environment




  • create real and imaginary sounds worlds




  • use imaginative play to create humorous characters and situations


ORAL LANGUAGE - 3rd and 4th Classes

Oral Language: developing receptiveness to oral language
The child should be enabled to


  • experience the teacher’s use of challenging vocabulary and sentence structure







  • give and follow instructions on how to perform a particular task or process




  • become increasingly aware of the importance of gesture, facial expression, tone of voice, audibility and clarity of enunciation in communication with others




  • use mime to convey ideas, reactions, emotions, desires and attitudes




  • discuss the use and effect of music, sound effects and non-verbal clues in audiotapes, videotapes and film clips



Oral Language: developing competence and confidence in using oral language
The child should be enabled to


  • give and take turns in speaking and experience a classroom environment in which tolerance for the views of others is fostered


  • initiate conversations and respond to the initiatives of others in talking about experiences and activities





  • present ideas that are relevant to the subject in a logical sequence




  • summarise and prioritise ideas




  • discuss the meanings and origins of words, phrases and expressions with the teacher




  • become aware of new words and new connotations of words through his/her reading and writing experience




  • play synonym and antonym games




  • become familiar with the functions of words without necessarily using technical grammatical terms




  • noun, verb, adjective, adverb, pronoun, preposition




  • practise the common social functions in the everyday context of class and school and through improvisational drama




    • introducing others to the class group or another pupil

    • expressing appreciation

    • expressing approval and disapproval

    • engaging in simple commercial transactions

    • expressing concern

    • asking questions to elicit views and feelings

    • expressing support

    • giving directions




  • make lists of local expressions and words




  • use improvisational drama to re-create well-known characters




  • hear, discuss and react to local storytellers


Oral Language: developing cognitive abilities through oral language

The child should be enabled to



  • discuss issues that directly affect his/her life



    • in school

    • outside school

    • in other areas of the curriculum




  • discuss a story being read and predict future events and likely outcomes in it




  • discuss different possible solutions to problems




  • discuss what he/she knows of a particular topic or process as a basis for encountering new concepts




  • discuss causes and effects in relation to processes and events and predict possible outcomes




  • listen to a presentation and discuss and decide which are the most important questions to ask




  • learn how to use the basic key questions - why? How? where? when? what? what if?




  • make presentations to the class about his/her own particular interests




  • justify personal likes and dislikes




  • argue a point of view and try to persuade others to support it




  • explore historical events through improvisational drama




  • explore reactions to ideas through improvisational drama



Oral Language: developing emotional and imaginative life through oral language
The child should be enabled to


  • describe everyday experiences to the class or group and discuss them




  • discuss favourite moments, important events and exciting characters in a story, play or poem



  • express reactions to events and characters in stories





  • discuss reactions to poems







  • express feelings and attitudes through improvisational drama




  • create and sustain imaginary contexts through improvisational drama




  • react to poems through improvisational drama




  • dramatise stories




  • experience and enjoy playful aspects of language




    • asking riddles and telling jokes

    • experimenting with funny-sounding words

    • playing word association games

    • reading and listening to examples of humorous literature

    • composing rhymes and verses

    • appreciating how words interact- how a word can trigger a humorous reaction

ORAL LANGUAGE - 5th and 6th Classes

Oral Language: developing receptiveness to Oral Language
The child should be enabled to


  • experience from the teacher a growing elaboration and sophistication in the use of vocabulary and sentence structure




  • listen to expressions, reactions, opinions and interpretations and retell or summarise them




  • listen to radio broadcasts and discuss what has been learned



  • follow detailed instructions or directions from others in order to test their accuracy





  • take part in games in which unseen objects are identified from descriptions given by other pupils




  • be continually aware of the importance of gesture, facial expression, audibility and clarity of enunciation in communicating with others




  • use mime to convey ideas, reactions, emotions, desires and attitudes







  • listen to or watch sound tapes, videos and films and discuss how sound effects enhance the content




  • listen to authors reading and discussing their own work



Oral Language: developing competence and confidence in using oral language
The child should be enabled to


  • acquire the ability to give detailed instructions and directions




  • converse freely and confidently on a range of topics




  • give and take turns in an environment where tolerance for the views of others is fostered




  • practise and use improvisational drama to acquire a facility in performing more elaborate social function




    • welcoming visitors

    • showing them the work of the class

    • making formal introductions

    • proposing a vote of thanks

    • expressing sympathy

    • making a complaint



  • discuss the positive and negative effects of jargon, slang and cliché, and express examples of them in his/her own language





  • understand the functions and know the names of the parts of speech – noun, verb, adjective, pronoun, conjunction, preposition, article, interjection.




  • learn about the name the basic properties of nouns and verbs




    • common, proper, gender, case, tense, voice, person, number




  • become familiar with compound and complex sentences, and know and understand the terms ‘phrase’ and ‘clause’




  • explore the possibilities of language and sentence structure in expressing increasingly complex thoughts




  • discuss the meaning, effect and diversity of local words and expressions




  • hear accents and dialects other than his/her own on tape and on video and discuss them




  • use improvisational drama to learn how local idiom, experience how accent and dialect can influence the effect of language in particular situations.




  1   2   3   4


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page