English department medium term plan



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ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

MEDIUM TERM PLAN


YEAR 8

A Christmas Carol

Aims:

  • This scheme is designed to support the teaching of the novel with a range of reading, writing and speaking and listening activities.

  • It presents opportunities for students to read and discuss a classic text focussing on language choices and overall impact.

  • It also provides them with the opportunity to identify the links between literary heritage and their time.

  • There are chapter activities and extension activities. These activities are designed for teachers to pick and choose or adapt. They are designed to help focus the students during shared reading or homework reading. (They also provide adequate cover lessons.)



Duration: 6 weeks
Resources:

  • Extracts from non-fiction books about Dickensian England

  • Research sheet – note-making template

  • Who wants to be a Dickens…….?

  • Chapter 1 – complete or abridged

  • Student grid – Hooking the Reader

  • Film version

  • Chapter 2

  • Film Version
  • Tension Chart


  • Cratchit family PEE chart

  • Chapter 3

  • Synonyms sheet

  • Chapter 4

  • Attitudes to Christmas sheet

  • Timeline


Key Outcomes:

    • ‘This is Your Life, Dickens’

    • Essay on Scrooge




Most students will: read key passages from the ‘A Christmas Carol’, both as shared text and within groups. They will respond analytically and creatively showing understanding of themes and narrative structures within the novel. They will produce two key assessment pieces showing an ability to analyse character and carry out a research independently.
Some student will not have progressed so far and will: read and enjoy most of the novel and engage with most of the work. They will write using ideas from the novel with support frameworks. And make an attempt at the analytical work with teacher support.
Some students will have progressed further and will: respond to the novel as pieces of well-crafted writing and then attempt to replicate and further ideas in their own work. They will show confidence and awareness of audience in their writing and clear thinking in their analytical work.

KEY TEACHING AND LEARNING OBJECTIVES




Pupils should be taught to:



WORD LEVEL


  • Appreciate the impact of figurative language; (W11)


SENTENCE LEVEL




  • Develop different ways of linking paragraphs, using a range of strategies to improve cohesion and coherence, e.g. choice of connectives, reference back, linking phrases; (S7)




TEXT LEVEL – READING





  • Combine information from various sources into one coherent document; (R1)

  • Undertake independent research using a range of reading strategies, applying their knowledge of how texts and ICT databases are organised and acknowledging sources; (R2)

  • Make notes in different ways, choosing a form which suits the purpose, e.g. diagrammatic notes, making notes during a video, abbreviating for speed and ease of retrieval; (R3)

  • Analyse overall structure of a text to identify how key ideas are developed, e.g. through the organisation of the content and the patterns of language used; (R10)

  • Read a substantial text (novel, play or work of one poet) revising and refining interpretations of subject matter, style and technique; (R13)

  • Recognise how texts refer to and reflect the culture in which they are produced e.g. in their evocation of time and place; (R16)

TEXT LEVEL – WRITING





  • Experiment with different approaches to planning, drafting, proofreading and presenting writing, taking account of the time available; (Wr1)

  • Use writing for thinking and learning by recording ideas as they develop to aid reflection and problem solving; (Wr3)
  • Organsise and present information, selecting and synthesising appropriate material and guiding the reader through the text, e.g. a technological process, an information leaflet; ((Wr10)


  • Weigh different viewpoints and present a balanced analysis of an event or issue, e.g. an environmental issue or historical investigation; (Wr16)

  • Integrate evidence into writing to support analysis or conclusions, e.g. data or quotations; (Wr17)


TEXT LEVEL – SPEAKING AND LISTENING





  • Reflect on their participation in drama and identify areas for development of dramatic techniques, e.g. keep a reflective record of their contributions to dramatic improvisation and presentation; (S/L13)

  • Use talk to question, hypothesise, speculate, evaluate, solve problems and develop thinking about complex issues and ideas; ((S/L11)

  • Collaborate in, and evaluate, the performances, scripted and unscripted, which explore character, relationships and issues; (S/L16)






POSSIBLE TEACHING SEQUENCE:
Week 1: Background to Dickens
OBJECTIVES:

  • Develop different ways of linking paragraphs, using a range of strategies to improve cohesion and coherence, e.g. choice of connectives, reference back, linking phrases; (S7)

  • Combine information from various sources into one coherent document; (R1)
  • Undertake independent research using a range of reading strategies, applying their knowledge of how texts and ICT databases are organised and acknowledging sources; (R2)


  • Make notes in different ways, choosing a form which suits the purpose, e.g. diagrammatic notes, making notes during a video, abbreviating for speed and ease of retrieval; (R3)

  • Organsise and present information, selecting and synthesising appropriate material and guiding the reader through the text, e.g. a technological process, an information leaflet; ((Wr10)

  • Use talk to question, hypothesise, speculate, evaluate, solve problems and develop thinking about complex issues and ideas; ((S/L11)


RESOURCES:

  • Extracts from non-fiction books about Dickensian England

  • Research sheet – note-making template

  • Who wants to be a Dickensiannaire?

  • Chapter 1 – complete or abridged


FOCUS:

  • Lesson 1:

    • Starter: Quickfire brainstorm what they know about Dickens?

    • Development: Look at some extracts about life in Dickensian England. What would life be like for a child then? How different to their lives now? Group work.

    • Plenary: Report back




  • Lesson 2:

  • Starter: Give examples of character names from Dickens’ novels – what are their expectations of their character? E.g. Fezziwig, Uriah Heap, Martin Chuzzlewit, Magwitch, Miss. Havisham, Fagin, etc.

  • Development: Introduction to research into Dickens using computers / books studied to research key areas of his life – family, life, work, key concerns, key themes. Make notes – give students note-making grid.

  • Plenary: Who wants to be a Dickensiannaire?


  • Homework: Using research, create either:

  1. Who’s Who? entry

  2. ‘This is Your Life, Dickens’

N.B. Due in end of Week 2 (use all homeworks)


  • Lesson 3:

  • Starter: Similes activity – match up exercise (including dead as a doornail)

  • Development: Read Chapter 1 as guided read from start up to ‘to play at blind man’s buff’. (N.B. teacher may paraphrase sections if necessary.)

  • Key elements upon which to focus:

  1. Marley – who he was etc.

  2. Scrooge – character

  3. Time of year

  4. Scrooge’s office – setting

  5. Fred (nephew)

  6. Charity collectors

  7. Scrooge’s clerk

  • Plenary: Adjective to describe Scrooge and / or a simile to describe him.



  • Lesson 4:

    • Starter: Divide class in half, one side have to come with arguments for celebrating Christmas and the other half against. Get them to work in pairs/fours initially and then report back together adding/extending ideas of others. Take a vote.

    • Development: Continue reading from ‘Scrooge took his melancholy dinner…’

    • Key elements:

    1. Visit by Marley’s ghost

    2. Why he haunts

    3. Set up visits by three ghosts

      • Prediction: Why has he visited Scrooge? What happens next?

    • Plenary: Share ideas



OUTCOMES:

  • Research findings: Who’s Who? Entry or ‘This is Your Life, Dickens’


  • Prediction


Week 2: Hooking the Reader
OBJECTIVES:

  • Appreciate the impact of figurative language; (W11)

  • Make notes in different ways, choosing a form which suits the purpose, e.g. diagrammatic notes, making notes during a video, abbreviating for speed and ease of retrieval; (R3)

  • Recognise how texts refer to and reflect the culture in which they are produced e.g. in their evocation of time and place; (R16)

  • Reflect on their participation in drama and identify areas for development of dramatic techniques, e.g. keep a reflective record of their contributions to dramatic improvisation and presentation; (S/L13)

  • Collaborate in, and evaluate, the performances, scripted and unscripted, which explore character, relationships and issues; (S/L16)


RESOURCES:

  • Student grid – Hooking the Reader

  • Film version

  • Chapter 2

  • Play script of ‘A Christmas Carol’


FOCUS:

  • Lesson 1:

  • Starter: Idioms sheet

  • Development: How does Dickens hook the reader in Chapter 1? (What makes you want to read on?)

      • Students give grid of techniques – find examples from text (differentiate for less able)

      • Report back.

  • Plenary: Choose one element that has ‘ hooked’ you.


        • Lesson 2:


    • Starter: Discussion – how would the film differ?

    • Development:

    1. Watch opening sequence

    2. How does it draw you in? etc.

    3. Watch up to equivalent end of Chapter 1

    4. List similarities / differences

    • Plenary: Which do you think is most effective?




  • Lesson 3:

    • Starter: List features typical of a play e.g. stage directions etc.

    • Development: Read extract from play script (p12) ‘And the Cardlers…’ end of scene. Students in groups of four read and act out extract. N.B. Focus on how stage directions etc. establish mood etc. Volunteers show.

    • Plenary: Discuss different interpretations by groups.




  • Lesson 4:

  • Starter: Recap predictions

  • Development: Read Chapter 2 up to ‘Rise! and walk with me! Ensure students understand what’s happening.

    • Set task – turn this into a script. Remind them of how to set out etc. Write in own language.

    • Complete for homework

  • Plenary: How would they feel if this happened to them?


OUTCOMES:

  • Drama activity

  • Script writing


Week 3: Ghost of Christmas Past
OBJECTIVES:
  • Read a substantial text (novel, play or work of one poet) revising and refining interpretations of subject matter, style and technique; (R13)


  • Use writing for thinking and learning by recording ideas as they develop to aid reflection and problem solving; (Wr3)

  • Weigh different viewpoints and present a balanced analysis of an event or issue, e.g. an environmental issue or historical investigation; (Wr16)

  • Integrate evidence into writing to support analysis or conclusions, e.g. data or quotations; (Wr17)


RESOURCES:

  • Dictionaries

  • Chapter 2

  • Film Version

  • Tension Chart

  • Cratchit family PEE chart and worksheet



FOCUS:


  • Lesson 1:

  • Starter: Dictionary work: Find definitions of mortal, odour, jocund, melancholy, despondent etc.

  • Development: Read Chapter 2 from ‘It would have been in vain…’ to ‘Let us see another Christmas!’

Discussion questions:

1) Where do they go?

2) What is Scrooge’s first reaction

3) Who do they encounter?

4) How does Scrooge feel about them?

5) Who is the ‘solitary child’?

6) What is he doing?

N.B. May write up full answers or use to guide oral discussion.


  • Plenary: How is Scrooge beginning to change?



    • Lesson 2:

      • Starter: Describe to partner your best Christmas. Partner reports back.

      • Development:

      1. Brighter groups continue reading next two visits with Christmas Past (paraphrase if necessary).
      2. and/or watch film version with lower ability.


      3. Students summarise what happens with:

a) Little Fan

b) Fezziwigs – emphasise only key points

c) Break up with Belle

d) Belle’s family Christmas

4. N.B. Weaker summarise only one


  • Plenary: Which is Scrooge’s best Christmas? Why?



    • Lesson 3:

      • Starter: Washing-line words from happy – sad. Rank order.

      • Development: Tension chart for Scrooge’s feelings during Chapter 2. Plot where they think they should go. Justify their ideas i.e. when Scrooge is happiest or least happy either written and/or orally.

      • Plenary: Report back.



        • Lesson 4:

          • Starter: Return to Chapter 1 when clerk mentioned

          • Development: Read Chapter 3 (start ‘Touch my robe’). Watch film version of visit to Cratchits. Students complete worksheet on Cratchits – finding evidence. PEE paragraphs for more able.

          • Plenary: Why is it important for Dickens to show us a happy family?



Outcomes:

            • Tension Chart

            • Worksheet/PEE paragraph on Crachits


Week 4: Ghost of Christmas Present and Future
OBJECTIVES:

  • Appreciate the impact of figurative language; (W11)
  • Read a substantial text (novel, play or work of one poet) revising and refining interpretations of subject matter, style and technique; (R13)


  • Integrate evidence into writing to support analysis or conclusions, e.g. data or quotations; (Wr17)

  • Use talk to question, hypothesise, speculate, evaluate, solve problems and develop thinking about complex issues and ideas; ((S/L11)


RESOURCES:

  • Chapter 3

  • Synonyms and Antonyms sheet

  • Chapter 4

  • Attitudes to Christmas sheet

  • Plenary Triangle


FOCUS:


  • Lesson 1:

    • Starter: Yes/No game. Choose a famous person. Others guess who you are by asking questions. Only answer using ‘Yes’ or ‘No’.

    • Development: Chapter 3. Teacher paraphrase ‘journey’ to Fred’s. Start reading from: ‘It was a great surprise to Scrooge’ to ‘He and the spirit were again upon their travels.’ Differentiate between Cratchit’s Christmas and Fred’s family.

    • Plenary: At the end Scrooge wants to speak but there is no time. What would he say?



      • Lesson 2:

        • Starter: Attitudes towards Christmas

        • Development:

        • Read end of Chapter 3 from ‘Much they saw…’ to end.

1) What’s happened to Ghost? Why?

2) What do the children Ignorance and Doom represent? N.B. More able groups only.


        • Focus on last paragraph and differentiate from other experiences with Ghosts i.e. Scrooge is awake, Ghost is silent etc. What do you expect to happen? What mood is being created?


        • Read start of Chapter 4 up to ‘carried him along’ (2 pages).

        • How does the mood contribute? Pick out key words/phrases suggesting atmosphere/mood?

  • Plenary: Key words


    • Lesson 3:

      • Starter: ‘Just a minute’ on subject of A Christmas Carol – speak for one minute with no hesitation, repetition..

      • Development:

      • Read Chapter 4 from ‘They scarcely seemed to enter the city…’ to ‘…Spirit, I beseech you!’.

      • Students act as detectives. Find clues to suggest identity of dead man. Who do they think it is?

      • Plenary: Plenary Triangle about dead man.




        • Lesson 4:

        • Starter: Synonymous and Antonyms starter

        • Development:

  • Chapter 4 from ‘The Phantom spread its dark robe…’ to end

  • Pupil activity: Tiny Tim’s life in 50 words exactly.

  • Scrooge realises he is the dead man.

        • Plenary: What can Scrooge do to reverse his fate?


Outcomes:

          • Plenary Triangle

          • Tiny Tim’s life in 50 words


Week 5: Resolution
OBJECTIVES:
  • Make notes in different ways, choosing a form which suits the purpose, e.g. diagrammatic notes, making notes during a video, abbreviating for speed and ease of retrieval; (R3)


  • Analyse overall structure of a text to identify how key ideas are developed, e.g. through the organisation of the content and the patterns of language used; (R10)

  • Experiment with different approaches to planning, drafting, proofreading and presenting writing, taking account of the time available; (Wr1)

  • Integrate evidence into writing to support analysis or conclusions, e.g. data or quotations; (Wr17)


RESOURCES:

  • Timeline


FOCUS:


    • Lesson 1:

      • Starter: Tell your partner about a time when you did something wrong and what you did to make it right.

      • Development: Read Chapter 5 and students list all the things Scrooge does to rectify his bad past.

      • Plenary: Pick out similes used by Scrooge – ‘I am as light as a feather’. Come up with own.



        • Lesson 2:

          • Starter: Acrostics for Scrooge – one as he was, one as he is now.

          • Development: Watch end of film. Compare ending with novel. N.B. you may wish to give them a similarities and differences grid as earlier in the scheme.

          • Plenary: Reminder of what a blurb is and does. Read example. Write blurb for this novel. Read aloud.



            • Lesson 3:

              • Starter: Create a timeline of own lives – key moments e.g. born, moved house, started school, big holiday, siblings born, etc.
              • Development: Timeline activity – give students a blank timeline and they must plot the key moments when Scrooge changes. N.B. Give list of suggestions to weaker.


              • Plenary: Pick three key moments in novel which have helped make him a better person and explain why to a partner/class.



                • Lesson 4:

                  • Starter: Who says: ‘Old Scratch has got his own at last, hey?’

                  • Development: Different opinions of Scrooge.

  • Jigsawing – give groups a character and using text find quotations and explain to support opinions: Fred, Bob Cratchit, Mrs Cratchit, Jacob Marley, Belle.

  • Report back to home group.

    • Plenary: Divide characters into those who are more forgiving than others. Why are they?


OUTCOMES:

  • Timeline

  • Opinions of Scrooge

Week 6: Scrooge
OBJECTIVES:

  • Develop different ways of linking paragraphs, using a range of strategies to improve cohesion and coherence, e.g. choice of connectives, reference back, linking phrases; (S7)

  • Experiment with different approaches to planning, drafting, proofreading and presenting writing, taking account of the time available; (Wr1)

  • Integrate evidence into writing to support analysis or conclusions, e.g. data or quotations; (Wr17)



RESOURCES:

  • Essay task sheet including success criteria (differentiate).

  • Planning sheets if appropriate (to be provided by teacher)

  • Connectives

  • Writing frame for less able (to be produced by class teacher as appropriate)

FOCUS:


  • Lesson 1:

  • Introduce task:

    • How does the character of Scrooge change in the novel ‘A Christmas Carol’?

    • Hand out and go through the:

    • Essay sheet with success criteria

    • Planning grid/table (if being used)

    • Copies of novel



Development:

      • Model how to open/introduce essay

      • Recap PEE

      • Paragraphs and use of quotation marks.

      • Sentence starters/connectives for start of paragraphs

      • Writing frame for weakest



  • Lessons 2-4:

    • Students continue to plan, draft and write essays.

    • Start and end each lesson with some form of focus e.g. spelling, sentence construction, connectives, peer/self-assessment of what they have written so far, etc.

    • If they complete the task more quickly they may have the opportunity to word process their work or provide them with an extension task such as writing a fictional account of a modern day ‘Scrooge.’



Outcomes:

  • Essay on Scrooge






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