Enhanced scope and sequence


Session 1: Trade and the Ottoman Empire



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Session 1: Trade and the Ottoman Empire

Materials
  • Timeline and brief history of the Ottoman Empire


  • Outline map of Europe, Asia, and Africa

  • Textbook and/or other readings about the Ottoman Empire

  • Web sites such as Istanbul. http://www.princeton.edu/~asce/const_95/const.html
Instructional Activities

1. Write the term Ottoman Empire on the board. Ask students to share what they know about this empire. Display their responses.

2. Provide a timeline of the Ottoman Empire, along with a brief outline of the empire’s history. Review both handouts with the class.

3. Distribute copies of an outline map of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Instruct students to represent the extent of the Ottoman Empire on the map by drawing its boundaries. Instruct them to label the present-day countries included in the territory that made up the Ottoman Empire.

4. Instruct students to identify the location of Constantinople on their map and label it with a star to indicate that it was the capital of the Ottoman Empire. Then, instruct them to draw a line through the name Constantinople and write in Istanbul. Explain that the city was renamed to reflect the new ruling power.

5. Instruct students to draw a large symbol of the Muslim faith on the map. Also instruct them to draw smaller symbols for the other religions that were accepted within the Ottoman Empire.

6. Explain to students that the Ottoman Empire was involved in the trade of coffee and ceramics. Instruct students to draw symbols on the map to reflect these products.

7. Assign a teacher-selected reading or other reinforcement activity.

Session 2: Trade and the Mughal Empire

Materials

  • Timeline and brief history of the Mughal Empire

  • Outline map of India

  • Pictures of the Taj Mahal

  • Samples of art from the Mughal Empire

  • Samples of Indian textiles

  • Web sites such as the following:

Mughal Empire. http://www.wsu.edu:8080/~dee/MUGHAL/MUGHMAP.HTM

Taj Mahal. http://www.pbs.org/treasuresoftheworld/a_nav/taj_nav/main_tajfrm.html


Instructional Activities

1. Write the term Mughal Empire on the board. Ask students to share what they know about this empire. Display their responses.

2. Provide a timeline of the Mughal Empire, along with a brief outline of the empire’s history. Review both handouts with the class.

3. Distribute copies of an outline map of India. Instruct students to represent the extent of the Mughal Empire on the map by drawing its boundaries.

4. Direct students to draw a symbol on the map to reflect the spread of Muslim Mughal rule into northern India.

5. Display pictures of the Taj Mahal. Provide a brief history of this structure, or instruct students to research the history, using available resources, and write a paragraph on the history of the Taj Mahal.

6. Provide time for students to research examples of art from the Mughal Empire and to create a list of this artwork. Display samples of the artwork around the classroom.

7. Ensure that students understand what textiles are. Explain that Indian textiles influenced the British textile industry. Provide examples of this influence. Instruct students to draw symbols of the British flag on the map to reflect this trade.

8. Explain that Portugal, England, and the Netherlands competed with each other for the Indian Ocean trade by establishing coastal ports on the Indian subcontinent. Instruct students to draw the flags for these countries along the coast of India.

9. Assign a teacher-selected reading or other reinforcement activity.

Session 3: Chinese and Japanese Trade

Materials

  • Outline map of Asia

  • Drawings of Chinese porcelain

  • Textbook and/or other readings about Chinese and Japanese trade

  • Class notes
Instructional Activities

1. Distribute copies of an outline map of Asia, and instruct students to label China and Japan on the map.

2. Display the following facts, and discuss them with the students:



  • China and Japan sought to limit the influence and activities of European merchants.

  • European demand for Chinese goods, such as tea and porcelain, increased.

Ask students to explain why these countries wanted to limit trade, and how they limited it. Instruct students to draw ships in the water and label them with the words tea
and porcelain to indicate this trade.

3. Provide drawings of Chinese porcelain. Discuss the reasons why Europeans wanted this product so much when it first became available to them. Discuss why people today might want porcelain. Have the reasons changed much over time?

4. Instruct students to use available resources to research the term shogun. Direct students to prepare a brief paper explaining the role of shoguns in Japan.

5. Assign a teacher-selected reading or other reinforcement activity.


Session 4: African Trade

Materials
Instructional Activities

1. Explain that the competition for trade led to the African slave trade, and discuss why this is so.

2. Distribute copies of an outline map of the world. Explain the triangular trade. Instruct students to indicate the goods being traded by drawing arrows that indicate the direction of trade and drawing pictures of the types of products traded.

3. Assign a teacher-selected reading or other reinforcement activity.

Session 5: Mercantilism and the Commercial Revolution

Materials

  • Class notes

  • Textbook or other instructional resources about mercantilism and the Commercial Revolution
Instructional Activities

1. Write the term mercantilism on the board. Instruct students to use the textbook or other instructional resources to develop a definition of this term.

2. Discuss as a class the competition for trade among European nations.

3. Display the following facts, and conduct a discussion of each as it is displayed:


  • European maritime nations competed with each other for overseas markets, colonies, and resources.

  • A new economic system emerged:

New money and banking systems were created.

Economic practices such as mercantilism evolved.

Colonial economies were limited by the economic needs of the mother country.

4. Assign a teacher-selected reading or other reinforcement activity.




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