Enhanced scope and sequence



Download 0.89 Mb.
Page3/50
Date conversion14.06.2018
Size0.89 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   50

Sample Resources

Below is an annotated list of Internet resources for this organizing topic. Copyright restrictions may exist for the material on some Web sites. Please note and abide by any such restrictions.

“Leonardo da Vinci.” Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York. http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/leon/hd_leon.htm. This site provides an image of “The Last Supper” and a brief description of that painting and the “Mona Lisa.”

“Michelangelo Images.” College at Oneonta. State University of New York. College at Oneonta. Oneonta, NY. http://employees.oneonta.edu/farberas/arth/arth213/michelangelo_images.html. This site contains images of sculptures and paintings by Michelangelo, including David, the Pieta, and portions of the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel.

Outline Maps: Education Place. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Company. http://www.eduplace.com/ss/maps/. This site provides outline maps that may be printed and used in the classroom.

“Sites on Shakespeare and the Renaissance.” Internet Shakespeare Editions. University of Victoria. British Columbia, Canada. http://web.uvic.ca/shakespeare/Annex/ShakSites1.html. This site provides links for sites on Shakespeare and the Renaissance, such as gateways, teaching resources, criticism, and history.


Session 1: Mapping the Political Boundaries about 1500 a.d. (c.e.)

Materials
  • Outline map of the world showing the boundaries of the following major states and empires about 1500 a.d. (c.e.): England, France, Spain, Russia, Ottoman Empire, Persia, China, Mughal India, Songhai Empire, Incan Empire, Aztec Empire


  • Colored pencils and/or markers

  • Outline map of the world showing the locations of major deserts and rivers of the world, including the following:

Deserts: Sahara, Gobi, Kalahari, Arabian

Rivers: Amazon, Mississippi, Danube, Rhine, Dniester, Nile, Congo, Zambezi, Niger, Indus, Ganges, Huang He, Chang, Mekong, Xi



  • Outline map of the world showing the locations of major bodies of water and mountains, including the following:

Oceans: Atlantic, Pacific, Arctic, Indian

Seas: Caribbean, Mediterranean, North, Baltic, Arabian, Caspian, Aral, Black, Red, South China

Gulfs/Bays: Persian, Mexico, Bengal, Aden

Mountains: Andes, Rockies, Appalachians, Sierra Madres, Atlas, Pyrenees, Alps, Ural, Himalayas, Caucasus


Instructional Activities

1. Explain the importance of understanding the world as it looked about 1500 a.d. (c.e.). Display an outline map of the world showing the boundaries of the states and empires listed above, and ask students to identify their locations, writing the names in the proper locations as they are identified.

2. Distribute colored pencils and copies of an outline map of the world that reflects states and empires about 1500 a.d. (c.e.). Instruct students to use the textbook and other resources provided to develop a color-coded map reflecting the boundaries of the states and empires at that time. Have students put a key to the colors on the back of the map in order to foster studying, using a flash-card-like technique. If desired, have students compare and study their maps in pairs. Display one of these maps, and have the class identify the states and empires by color.

3. Distribute additional copies of an outline map of the world, and have students use the textbook or other instructional resources to number each state and empire and create a key to the numbers on the back. Have students compare their maps in pairs, and again, display one of these maps, and have the class identify the states and empires by number.

4. If time permits, conduct a review of all three maps.

5. Assign a teacher-selected reading or other reinforcement activity.

Session 2: Mapping the World’s Major Religions in 1500 a.d. (c.e.)

Materials

  • Outline map of the world

  • Colored pencils and/or markers

  • Textbook and other instructional resources

  • A six-sided die

  • Web sites for maps, such as Outline Maps: Education Place
    at http://www.eduplace.com/ss/maps/
Instructional Activities

1. Distribute copies of an outline map of the world and colored pencils. Instruct students to use the textbook and other instructional resources to develop a color-coded map reflecting the location of the five major world religions about 1500 a.d. (c.e.). Have students put a key to the colors on the back of the map in order to foster studying, using a flash-card-like technique. If desired, have students work in pairs, or work with the whole class to color code a map. Have students take a few minutes to study this map alone or in pairs. Together as a class, practice locating the five religions on a displayed map.

2. If time permits, split students into groups of three. Have each group study all four maps—the one from the previous step, and the three from the previous session. Allow five to seven minutes for this process. Explain that you will roll a die to see which person on each team will be chosen to identify the locations on a map. Each student must pick two different numbers between 1 and 6 so that all six sides of the die are taken. Rapidly go through each team, rolling the die to choose the person, and have him/her identify locations on one of the maps. Give one point for each correct location (or 10 points for a correct map). Play as many rounds as desired or as time allows.

3. Assign a teacher-selected reading or other reinforcement activity.

Session 3: Mapping the World’s Major Trade Routes in 1500 a.d. (c.e.)

Materials

  • Outline map of the world

  • Colored pencils and/or markers

  • Attachment A: Notes on Trade Routes

  • Web sites such as the following:

Outline Maps: Education Place
at http://www.eduplace.com/ss/maps/

Asia Society. http://www.askasia.org/teachers (Search “silk roads”)


Instructional Activities

1. Distribute copies of an outline map of the world and colored pencils. Display an outline map, and direct students in the development of a map depicting major trades routes about 1500 a.d. (c.e.), including the following:

  • Silk Routes across Asia to the Mediterranean basin

  • Maritime routes across the Indian Ocean

  • Trans-Saharan routes across North Africa

  • Northern European links with the Black Sea

  • Western European sea and river trade

  • South China Sea and lands of Southeast Asia

Have the class consider one route at a time, explaining its importance. Have students locate which empires the trade route helped connect and tell why the route got its name. Direct students to complete each trade route in a different color and create a key to the colors.

2. Display Attachment A. Direct students to take notes in question-answer format, as follows:



  • Draw a vertical line down a sheet of paper about a third of the way from the left edge.

  • On the left side of the line, write questions; on the right, the corresponding answers.

Explain to students that their notes will be easy to study from by covering up the answers on the right side with another sheet of paper and trying to answer the questions.

3. Assign a teacher-selected reading or other reinforcement activity.





1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   50


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page