Eoc/Spring Break Review Packet Day 1 Read the following poem and answer the questions below



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What is most clearly the effect of Arsenault’s allusion to General Sherman in the last paragraph?


  1. to caution people about the potential drawbacks of air conditioning

  2. to compare today’s air conditioned South to the way it was during the Civil War

  3. to credit air conditioning with conquering the South’s heat and humidity

  4. to criticize air conditioning for destroying the South’s unique cultural identity

Text Feature PURPOSE

A. Title ___To compare information visually.

B. Table of contents ___To explain the meanings of the colors and symbols on a map

C. Headings and subheadings ___To show when things happened

D. Captions and labels ___To organize information containing numbers.

E. Bold key words ___Tells us where we can find specific information on topics in the book

F. Index ___Tell us important vocabulary words

G. Glossary ___Gives definitions for important vocab in the text

H. Graph ___Tells the topic of the text

I. Diagram ___To show the parts of something

J. Chart or table ___Tell us what pictures, diagrams, and graphs are showing us

K. Map ___To show locations, routes, and events.

L. Time Line ___Tell us what the major sections of a chapter will be about

M. Map Legend ___Tells us what the major chapters of the book will be about and where they are


Text Structures

  1. If you have ever looked up at the sky and thought you saw something strange – perhaps something that looked like a flying saucer – you’re not alone. Every year hundreds of people report seeing strange objects, or objects known as UFOs (Unidentified Flying Objects). However, most of these UFOs turn out to be something ordinary, such as meteors, military aircraft, or weather balloons. In some cases, people even make up stories and create fake photos for publicity.


Most scientists do not believe that the planet Earth has been visited by alien beings. In fact, space exploration supports the belief that no other planet in our solar system has the technology that could send flying objects to Earth. In addition, the distance between our planet and the nearest star would make it extremely difficult for alien beings to visit Earth.


    1. cause and effect

    2. main idea and details

    3. compare and contrast

    4. sequence




  1. Auditions for Fame were held Saturday from 10:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. in the auditorium. Julie woke up early that morning to finish reading the play. At 9:30 A.M. her mother drove her to school for the audition. As she walked into the auditorium, she grew nervous, but once she saw her friends, she relaxed a bit. During auditions, Julie read a few scenes and did a monologue. At the end of auditions, Mrs. Martinez announced that callbacks would be posted outside her door on Monday.




    1. compare and contrast

    2. main idea and details

    3. sequence

    4. cause and effect

3. Last summer, there was very little rain. Because of the dry conditions, there were more forest fires than usual. People’s lawns and gardens were brown and sun-baked. Water supplies were very low, and many cities and towns put limits on how much water people could use.




  1. sequence

  2. cause and effect

  3. main idea and details

  4. problem and solution

4. Have you ever heard the saying, “One man’s trash is another man’s fortune?” There are a number of stories from people who have found valuable antiques at auction sales, rummage sales, or Salvation Army resale shops. Next time you think about throwing or giving something away, perhaps you should determine its value.



  1. main idea and details

  2. cause and effect

  3. problem and solution

  4. sequence

5. Bats are important pollinators and are vital to our ecosystem; however, several species of North American bats have become endangered. Contributing to their endangerment is the fact that bats are sometimes deliberately killed by people and are also disturbed by spelunkers and tourists entering their caves. For example, caves are often vandalized when bats hibernate in the winter. Just entering a hibernation cave can result in mortality to the bat because disturbances can arouse them, requiring them to use enough stored energy that they do not survive the winter. The Gray Bat and the Indiana Bat of the Eastern and Midwestern United States, for example, are both endangered as a result of these activities.

Many bat caves now have gates that allow bats to fly through the open grating, but keep people out. This preventative measure has helped to protect important bat hibernation areas. Also, rather than killing bats that roost in buildings or block up entries, Bat Conservation International encourages the placement of bat houses nearby, which the bats tend to occupy instead.


  1. problem and solution

  2. compare and contrast

  3. main idea and details

  4. sequence



Important Words to Know

EOC Terms: Words Found in Form I Questions


Fragment – An incomplete sentence (Sentence lacking a subject or predicate)

5. Which of the following is a fragment?

12. Which of the following is a fragment?

Suggest – To remind or make someone think of something, or to hint at something

6. Which of the following suggests that the writer enjoyed the summer?

31. In “A City Remembered,” what does the simile in lines 26-28 suggest?

41. At the end of the selection, what does the dialogue suggest?

Combine – To join sentences together

7. How should sentences 1 and 2 best be combined to reduce wordiness and increase sentence variety?

18. How should sentences 14 and 15 best be combined to improve clarity?
Variety – Showing many different forms or structures of sentences

7. How should sentences 1 and 2 best be combined to reduce wordiness and increase sentence variety?


Emphasize – To stress or give importance to something

9. Which sentence should be added the final paragraph to emphasize the main idea of the selection?

26. In the middle of paragraph 30, what does the simile, “Like a child…” emphasize about the narrator?

55. In paragraph 8, what do words such as misfortune, ostracized, and disheartened emphasize?


Main Idea – What the text is mostly about

9. Which sentence should be added the final paragraph to emphasize the main idea of the selection?

34. How is the main idea of the selection reflected in its title?

42. What is the main idea of this selection?


Clarity – The quality of being clearly expressed (Clearness of expression)

14. How could sentence 5 best be rewritten to improve clarity and conciseness?

18. How should sentences 14 and 15 best be combined to improve clarity?

Conciseness – Using as few words as possible to give the necessary information (Short and clearly written)

14. How could sentence 5 best be rewritten to improve clarity and conciseness?

Indicate – To state or show an opinion, feeling or intention

19. What is the writer indicating in sentence 1 by the term rebels?

24. Which action best indicates the narrator’s desire to protect Geri’s feelings?

25. In paragraphs 23 and 24, what does Geri’s personification of animals indicate about her character?


Conclude – To end (The final or last)

20. Which would make the best concluding sentence for the selection?


Narrator Somebody who tells a story, or the speaker of a poem

21. In what way are the narrator and turtle similar?

24. Which action best indicates the narrator’s desire to protect Geri’s feelings?

26. In the middle of paragraph 30, what does the simile, “Like a child…” emphasize about the narrator?

39. What does the narrator imply when she refers to Dr. Singh as “a chauffeur of the exotic”?

40. …the narrator writes, “Not in all the world could we think of a better one.” To what is she referring?


Symbolize – To stand for or represent something (An object representing an abstraction)

22. What do ponds symbolize in the selection?



DialogueThe words spoken by a character in the selection

23. How does Joe’s dialogue characterize him?

41. At the end of the selection, what does the dialogue suggest?
Characterize (Character) – To represent the way a person behaves or looks (Qualities of reputation)

23. How does Joe’s dialogue characterize him?

25. In paragraphs 23 and 24, what does Geri’s personification of animals indicate about her character?

Personification The attribution of human qualities to animals, objects, or abstract notions

25. In paragraphs 23 and 24, what does Geri’s personification of animals indicate about her character?

Simile – A comparison between two different things using “like” or “as”

26. In the middle of paragraph 30, what does the simile, “Like a child…” emphasize about the narrator?

31. In “A City Remembered,” what does the simile in lines 26-28 suggest?
Tone –The author’s attitude or view of their subject

32. Which of the following best describes the tone at the end of “A City Remembered”?

35. What is the significance of the author’s tone?
Significance (Significant) Having importance or great meaning, or implied or intended meaning

35. What is the significance of the author’s tone?

45. Based on the selection, what would be the most significant consequence of coral reef extinction?
Summarize – To give a shortened version of something, stating its main points

36. Based on the selection, which statement best summarizes the narrator’s opinion?

54. Which statement best summarizes the author’s opinion about America and its citizens?
Opinion – The view somebody takes about an issue, based on personal judgment. (Not Fact)

36. Based on the selection, which statement best summarizes the narrator’s opinion?

54. Which statement best summarizes the author’s opinion about America and its citizens?
Setting – The place and time of the events of the selection

37. What does the description of the setting foreshadow?


Foreshadow – To indicate or suggest something that is going to happen

37. What does the description of the setting foreshadow?

Effect – An impression produced in the mind of somebody who reads something

38. What effect does the author create by including Nanda in the selection?

46. What is the effect of the statistics and research findings provided in the selection?

Imply – To make something understood without expressing it directly

39. What does the narrator imply when she refers to Dr. Singh as “a chauffeur of the exotic”?


Refer – A written comment that mentions or calls to attention somebody or something

39. What does the narrator imply when she refers to Dr. Singh as “a chauffeur of the exotic”?

40. …the narrator writes, “Not in all the world could we think of a better one.” To what is she referring?
Position – A view or opinion one has about a topic

43. What position does the author appear to take on the subject of global warming?


Eventually – In the end, after a long time

44. How can warmer waters eventually lead to corals’ deaths?


ConsequenceSomething that follows as a result, the relation between a result and its cause

45. Based on the selection, what would be the most significant consequence of coral reef extinction?


Purpose – The reason for which something exists, the goal, or the intended outcome

47. In paragraph 2, what is the purpose of the description of fishing techniques used in Indonesia and…?

49. What is the main purpose of this selection?
Appropriate – Suitable for the occasion or circumstances

50. What makes the selection’s title appropriate?


Alternate – To shift back and forth

53. Why does the author alternate between first and third person?

1st, 2nd, and 3rd Person Narration – Point of View of the narrator (1st-I, 2nd-You, 3rd-She, He, or It)

53. Why does the author alternate between first and third person?



From People Magazine September 13, 2004 Vol. 62 No. 11

Climbing Higher

By Thomas Fields-Meyer

Alone in the Wilderness, Aron Ralston Cheated Death by Amputating His Arm. That Was Just the Start of His Amazing Tale

  • In high school, Aron Ralston earned a quirky nickname: "Hoover." Sit down to brunch with the lanky mountaineer, and it's easy to see why. At an outdoor cafe near his home in Aspen, Colo., the 28-year-old vacuums up french fries covered with Parmesan cheese, a Bloody Mary, a Dungeness crab and egg dish—then caps the meal off with a pile of pistachio ice cream. "I've eaten four large pizzas in a single sitting," he boasts between mouthfuls. His mother, Donna, still can't figure out where he stows it all on his 6'2", 175-lb. frame. "He can consume," she says. "You sit there in awe."

    Whether it's eating or the adventure sports at which he excels—telemark skiing, climbing, mountain biking—Ralston goes for the gusto. Never more so than since May 2003, when he made headlines after an 800-lb. boulder crashed down on his right hand as he hiked alone in a Utah canyon. Trapped for six days, Ralston eventually freed himself—by sawing his limb off just above the wrist with a 3-in. pocketknife. Hearing the yarn is enough to make most people cringe, but Ralston is matter-of-fact about the ordeal. When strangers ask about his arm, the soft-spoken outdoorsman says simply, "I got it trapped under a boulder and cut it off." Since scattering the ashes of the amputated limb in the same canyon 6 months after his escape, Ralston, a concert pianist in college, says he hasn't mourned. "I dealt directly with what I went through," he says. "There wasn't a lot of grief left."

    What has moved Ralston is the impact of his story on others. Now he's relived the experience in Between a Rock and a Hard Place, a memoir he hopes will inspire readers to overcome adversity. "There was a miracle that was enacted through me," he says of the ordeal. "It's not so impressive that I cut my arm off, but that I survived cutting my arm off."

    Ralston acknowledges that luck had a lot to do with it. Out for a day of solo canyoneering on April 26, 2003, he slithered down a steep, narrow stone "slot" in the Utah desert, 120 miles from the nearest gas station. Scrambling over rocks, he loosened a boulder, which tumbled forward and pinned his hand.

    A cool head—and some previous rescue training—saved his life. Subsisting on two burritos and one liter of water, Ralston fended off hypothermia during frigid desert nights. By the fourth day he had run out of provisions, and he drank his urine to keep hydrated. Rigging a pulley system with his climbing gear, he struggled in vain to budge the rock. "Twenty-four hours into it, I was sure I was going to die," he says. Taping a will with his camcorder, he asked loved ones to spread his ashes in the wilderness. ("I watched his video last summer—it took me a long time to get up the courage," says Donna, 57, who is director of a landscapers' association. "We watched it together, and we cried.")

    Ralston had considered self-amputation early on—going so far as to apply an improvised tourniquet and stab his arm with his small pocketknife. But he believed the blade was too dull to cut through bone. Still, starving, dehydrated, and fading in and out of consciousness on the morning of his sixth day, he probed his wounds and discovered the flesh was rotting. Certain a growing infection would kill him, he writes, "I lash out in fury, trying to yank my forearm straight out from the sandstone handcuff, never wanting more than I do now to simply rid myself of any connection to this decomposing appendage."

    In that moment Ralston realized he could snap the bones in his arm by jerking the limb sharply, "like bending a two-by-four in a table vise." Accomplishing the task, he then cut away the flesh, muscles and tendons in his arm for nearly an hour. Save for slicing through a single nerve bundle that felt "as though I [had] thrust my entire arm into a cauldron of magma," he felt more elation than pain, and never screamed. "I don't want it," he writes of how he viewed his dying limb. "It's garbage. Throw it away, Aron. Be rid of it." By noon he had freed himself, wrapped his bleeding stump in a sling, rappelled down a 65-foot canyon wall and hiked 6 miles before running into a pair of Dutch hikers. "I was trying to pace myself," he says. "I'd lost so much blood."

    Airlifted first to a Utah hospital, Ralston soon underwent five operations, including two to halt a life-threatening bone infection. In one procedure, doctors grafted muscle and skin from his thighs onto the damaged arm. Those excruciating days and the weeks of depression that followed were "the low point of my life," he says. "It was like, 'I got out of the canyon for this?' "

    But with physical therapy, medication and cutting-edge prosthetics (see box), he was back in the high country by September. After his experience, "a lot of people would have thought, 'That's all the reason I need not to go climbing again,' " says Ralston. "But that was the first thing I wanted to do." His mother had other ideas. "I've asked him not to do it," says Donna. "And he said, 'But Mom, you always told us to finish what we started.' "

    This winter Ralston plans to complete a long-stated goal of solo summiting all of the state's 14,000-ft. peaks. Aided by prosthetic forearms, he climbed two mountains before this year's thaw. "Since the incident, his enthusiasm has done nothing but increase," says Ralston's Aspen roommate Brian Payne, 26.

    Ralston has also honed his first aid skills as a member of a mountain rescue squad, learning how to perform CPR with a prosthesis. "If I detach at the wrist," he says, "I can get really good pressure to do chest compressions." "He's a good team player, tough as nails," says Hugh Zuker, president of Mountain Rescue Aspen. And he's also gotten used to an unlikely celebrity that's led to marriage proposals from strangers. But Ralston, who isn't dating at the moment, isn't ready to settle down. "He's in love with Mother Nature," says sister Sonja Ralston Elder, 24. "I don't know how a girl could compete with that."

    Ralston's parents have long supported that passion since moving from Indiana to Colorado when Aron was 12. Not long after graduating from Carnegie Mellon University, he quit a job at Intel in Albuquerque to move to Aspen and the mountains he loves. Says Sonja: "He was living his dream."

    Although the idyll briefly turned hellish, Ralston says it gave him a mission: to help others live life to its fullest. Still stricken by phantom pain, he takes strength from strangers' letters—including one from a woman who wrote she'd stockpiled sleeping pills until reading his tale, then decided suicide wasn't an option. "My accident has given me an ability to be deep with people very quickly," he says. "Can you imagine how good it feels when a stranger walks up to you, shakes your hand and says, 'I think you're an amazing person'?"




To Save a Life, a Limb Is Sacrificed

Once I've opened up a large enough hole in my arm, about 4 inches below my wrist, I momentarily stow the knife, holding its handle in my teeth, and poke first my left forefinger and then my left thumb inside my arm.... Prodding and pinching, I can distinguish between the hard tendons and ligaments and the soft, rubbery feel of the more pliable arteries. I should avoid cutting the arteries until the end if I can help it at all, I decide.

Withdrawing my bloody fingers to the edge of my incision point, I isolate a strand of muscle between the knife and my thumb, and using the blade like a paring knife, I slice through a pinky-finger-sized filament. I repeat the action a dozen times, slipping the knife through string after string of muscle without hesitation or sound. Sort, pinch, rotate, slice.

—from Between a Rock and a Hard Place



ANSWER THE FOLLOWING IN YOUR DAYBOOK!
1. What do you learn about Aron Ralston through both direct characterization and indirect

characterization.

2. How does the imagery presented through the following similes and metaphor affect your

understanding of Ralston’s predicament?

“…like bending a two-by-four in a table vise…”

“…felt as though I [had] thrust my entire arm into a cauldron of magma…”

“It’s garbage.”


3. Why would some people consider it to be ironic that Ralston chose to climb again?

4. What does the scattering of the ashes of Aron’s amputated limb symbolize?

5. Why is the title of Ralston’s memoir Between a Rock and a Hard Place appropriate?

Day 4

Telephone Conversation

Wole Soyinka

The price seemed reasonable, location

Indifferent. The landlady swore she lived

Off premises. Nothing remained

But self-confession. “Madam,” I warned,

5 “I hate a wasted journey—I am African.”

Silence. Silenced transmission of

Pressurized good-breeding. Voice, when it came,

Lipstick coated, long gold-rolled

Cigarette-holder pipped. Caught I was, foully.

10 “HOW DARK?” . . . I had not misheard . . . “ARE YOU LIGHT

OR VERY DARK?” Button B. Button A. Stench

Of rancid breath of public hide-and-speak.

Red booth. Red pillar-box. Red double-tiered

Omnibus squelching tar. It was real! Shamed

15 By ill-mannered silence, surrender

Pushed dumbfoundment to beg simplification.

Considerate she was, varying the emphasis—

“ARE YOU DARK? OR VERY LIGHT?” Revelation came.

“You mean—like plain or milk chocolate?”

20 Her assent was clinical, crushing in its light

Impersonality. Rapidly, wavelength adjusted,

I chose. “West African sepia”—and as an afterthought,

“Down in my passport.” Silence for spectroscopic

Flight of fancy, till truthfulness clanged her accent

25 Hard on the mouthpiece. “WHAT’S THAT?” conceding,

“DON’T KNOW WHAT THAT IS.” “Like brunette.”

“THAT’S DARK, ISN’T IT?” “Not altogether.

Facially, I am brunette, but madam, you should see

The rest of me. Palm of my hand, soles of my feet

30 Are a peroxide blonde. Friction, caused—

Foolishly, madam—by sitting down, has turned

My bottom raven black—One moment madam!”—sensing

Her receiver rearing on the thunderclap

About my ears—“Madam,” I pleaded, “wouldn’t you rather

35 See for yourself?”

Answer the questions below.

_____ 1. When the voice on the phone asks “ARE YOU LIGHT / OR VERY DARK?” in lines 10-11, the primary concern is:

a. if the narrator is white or black

b. how dark skinned is the narrator (with the assumption that he is black)

c. if the narrator is African or not

d. it is symbolic of the narrator’s moral mindset

_____ 2. In line 5, the narrator says, “I hate a wasted journey.”  This implies:

a. the narrator is an impatient person

b. the narrator has more important things to do than to meet with the landlord

personally

c. the narrator has experienced discrimination previously

d. the narrator wishes to make the most out of life


_____ 3. The tone set by the narrator in line 19 is:

a. facetious

b. inquisitive

c. incredulous

d. jaded
_____ 4. What is the effect of using all capitals for the landlady’s words?

a. it gives more importance to the landlady’s meaning

b. it points out the theme of the poem

c. it is ironic since the landlady is being fair

d. it reinforces that the landlady is being unreasonable
_____ 5. What is most likely to happen next?

a. the narrator will get the apartment

b. the narrator will make the trip to see the apartment, but will not be allowed to rent 

c. the narrator will turn down the chance to rent the apartment

d. the landlady will not allow the narrator a chance to look at the apartment
Constructed Response:

In lines 28-32, the narrator describes himself in many shades of black and brown. Use at least one example from the text to show how this exemplifies the theme of this poem. Write your answer on a separate sheet of paper.



Analogy Practice

1.) BIRD : NEST :: 

(A) dog : doghouse


(B) squirrel : tree

(C) beaver : dam

(D) cat : litter box
(E) book : library

2.) DALMATIAN : DOG ::

(A) oriole : bird

(B) horse : pony

(C) shark : great white

(D) ant : insect

(E) stock : savings


3.) DOCTOR : HOSPITAL ::

(A) sports fan : stadium

(B) cow : farm

(C) professor : college

(D) criminal : jail
(E) food : grocery store

4.) CUB : BEAR ::

(A) piano : orchestra

(B) puppy : dog

(C) cat : kitten

(D) eagle : predator
(E) fork : utensil

1. December is to winter as September is to _______________.



spring

cooler

school

autumn

2. Good is to better as cool is to _______________.



cold

good

cooler

warm

3. Water is to liquid as ice is to _______________.



snow

freezing

solid

slippery

4. Trade is to maid as cool is to _______________.



lower

chill

neat

rule

5. Milk is to refrigerator as ice cream is to _______________.


flavors

scoop

frozen

freezer

6. Fahrenheit is to Thirty-two as Celsius is to _______________.



zero

degrees

freezing

thermometer

7. Rain is to drop as snow is to _______________.



flake

shovel

storm

white






Define the following terms


  • Central Idea

  • Characterization

  • Conflict

  • Dialogue

  • Inference

  • Metaphor

  • Oxymoron

  • Personification

  • Point of View 1st, 2nd, and different types of 3rd

  • Setting

  • Simile

  • Theme

  • alliteration


  • allusion

  • analogy

  • flashback

  • foreshadowing

  • hyperbole

  • imagery

  • irony – dramatic, situational, verbal

  • mood

  • onomatopoeia

  • parallel structure

  • symbolism

  • tone

  • understatement


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