Everybody Has a Literacy Story Tell Us Yours!



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Suggestions for hosting an "Everybody Has a Literacy Story...Tell Us Yours!" Day/Hour/Class

Host an event in your own classroom, asking students to write about a literacy event that proved especially meaningful in their lives. Encourage (but please don’t require) students to post their stories on the Digital Archive of Literacy Narratives (DALN).

Host an event in your home department, gathering stories about literacy (or teaching literacy) from colleagues, students, and staff members. Use a digital audio recorder or a digital video camera to record stories.

Talk with your school’s Writing Center, Learning Center, or Center for Teaching Excellence about setting up a temporary recording station so that folks can drop in and tell their stories. Collect stories in writing or use a digital audio recorder or a digital video camera to record stories.

Set up a simple story recording booth. Send out invitations to favorite students, colleagues, writing center staff members inviting them to make an appointment for a story-telling session about literacy. Use a digital audio recorder or a digital video camera to record stories.

Play roving reporter. Go out on your campus with a video camera or a digital audio recorder and ask people to tell you a story about a literacy event that proved especially meaningful in their lives. Be sure to get signed consent before you record! (Versions of the DALN Consent forms are included in this packet—all three forms need to be signed before you record.) Also see Tips for Recording in Public Places.


1

How to record stories…

Step 1: Inform participants about what you are doing before you start recording! Have every one complete the three permission forms we need for every narrative 1.) DALN Informed Consent Form. 2). the DALN Release Form, and 3.) EITHER the Deed of Gift form OR the Creative Commons License Form. (These forms are included in this packet; also please see Why We Need Those Forms!)

Step 2: Play people a sample story to let them know what a literacy narrative is. Listen to “Memory Work” and watch “The Eagles.” (Both of these clip samples from the DALN will come to you in a separate zipped folder.

Step 3: Offer people some memory prompts. (See “What is a literacy narrative?” included in this packet.) Talk to people about the range of stories they could tell. (See “What is a literacy narrative?” included in this packet.)

Step 4: Record the story (with a video camera or a digital audio recorder) or have the author write the story (editing it if desired).

Step 5: Load the recorded story onto a computer (if it’s not already in digital form). Also gather any supporting artifacts you want to upload along with the narrative (digitized photographs, scanned letters, digitized drawings).

Step 6: Upload the story directly to the Digital Archive of Literacy Narratives (DALN). Be sure to include “CCCC2009” as one of the key words to describe the literacy narrative so that CCCC members can search on that term.


OR

Have the author fill out the “About your literacy narrative...” worksheet (included in this packet) form. Then, send us 1.) the story on a CD or DVD, 2.) signed copies of all three permission forms, 3.) the completed “About my story..” worksheet: Cynthia L. Selfe, 164 W. 17th Ave, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43214.

What tools you might use…

If you’re going to work with print narratives, you can use any word processing document and save the file in Rich Text Format (.rtf)

If you’re going to work with audio narratives, you can use any digital audio recorder to produce a sound file (.mp3).

Or you can use any laptop computer that has a built-in microphone and a basic audio-recording software package loaded on it. For audio-recording software, we recommend Quicktime Pro (an inexpensive piece of software that will record audio). A copy of Quicktime Pro is $29.95 and can be downloaded for Macs or PCs.


If you’re going to work with video narratives, you can use any digital video camera (like an inexpensive Flip video camera) and save the file as a Quicktime video (.mov) or a Windows Media Viewer file (.wmv).

Or you can use any laptop computer with a built-in camera and microphone, and a basic video-recording software package loaded on it. For video recording software, we recommend Quicktime Pro (an inexpensive piece of software that will record video). A copy of Quicktime Pro is $29.95 and can be downloaded for Macs or PCs.

For more information, read through our Recording Tips guidelines (included in this packet).


What to do with the stories you collect…

If you record or collect stories in a place where you have Internet access to the Digital Archives of Literacy Narratives (DALN), people can upload their own stories after registering their e-mail address (which is used only to contact authors in case of technical difficulties).



If you prefer that we upload your stories, we will need 4 forms signed/completed. See Why We Need Those Forms:

1. the literacy narrative on a CD or DVD

2. signed copies of all 4 forms we need for each narrative

About my literacy narrative…” worksheet (included in packet).

DALN Informed Consent Form (included in packet).

DALN Release Form (included in packet), and

EITHER the Deed of Gift Form OR the CC License.doc (included in packet).

Publicize your event

For help in publicizing your event, you might find our Publicity Flier and our Press/Radio Release useful. Also feel free to use our general DALN Flier for informational purposes.


If you are recording in a public space, see our Recording in Public Places Tips post an Audio/Video Recording in Progress Notice to alert individuals who may not want to be involved.
Further information: Cynthia L. Selfe ,164 W. 17th Ave,

Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43214




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