Fahrenheit 451



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Brian had a huge vocabulary test to study for. He had put it off all weekend, (compound) but now was the time for him to buckle down and get to it. The urge to play Call of Duty pulled at him. “Just five more minutes,” he thought. Five hours later, Brian crashed on his bed asleep, vocabulary sheets untouched on his desk. Apparently (adverb opener), the addiction to technology and the lure of violent video games was too much for him. Ray Bradbury, in Fahrenheit 451, creates a similarly destructive society with individuals who behave and think in ways that are damaging.

In Fahrenheit 451 (prep phrase opener), Ray Bradbury exposes several modern problems. Mildred is constantly shoving her “sea shells”, or ear buds, in her ear; she even sleeps with them. Bradbury is suggesting that we use technology and media to avoid communicating with each other and facing real problems. This behavior has an additive quality to it, as Mildred seems unable to break away from her technology. Clarisse says that the kids in her school are taught through video teachers. Clearly (adverb opener), a comment about our educational system is being made here. Education is being depicted as a method of keeping kids occupied and out of their parents’ way, not as a means of helping kids really learn. Additionally, Mrs. Phelps cries when she hears Montag read the poem about needing other people in life. This shows she really has no one that cares about her, so Bradbury is suggesting that in our society, people are becoming more and more disconnected from each other. Beyond this disconnect, the people in the Fahrenheit society are unwilling to face their problems and avoid literature that brings their problems to light. These are just a few of the problems Ray Bradbury explores in his novel Fahrenheit 451.

Bradbury creates a society in his novel Fahrenheit 451 that is very similar to our own. High school students are constantly tied to their technological devices. Many cell phones are confiscated each day at Yorba Linda High School, despite the fact that students are permitted to use cell phones between classes and at break/lunch. Teenagers, like most people in the society, are constantly tempted to use their technological devices. Like Mildred, these people seem to use technology in an addictive way, to escape the realities of their lives. Even very young children are tied to technology. My four year old cousin is constantly using his I-pad. He becomes distraught and upset if he has it taken away, even for a short period of time. Obviously (adverb), parents have turned to electronics to be their children’s babysitters. Mrs. Bowels, in the novel, uses TV watching in a similar way. Both scenarios demonstrate how parents let their children overuse technology because they don’t want to do the hard work of parenting themselves. Violence on TV is becoming more and more common. Even cartoons like Tom and Jerry show many instances of Tom, in particular, getting blown up, smashed, or run over. Repeated exposure to this type of violence has to desensitize children to brutal acts. If this continue to happen (adverbial clause), modern society is likely to end up with groups of kid, like the teenagers in Fahrenheit 451, who think its entertaining to drive their cars and try to hit people with them . Ray Bradbury had an uncanny ability to see the lasting consequences of advances in technology when he creates the realistic society he does in Fahrenheit 451.

Ray Bradbury’s understanding of human nature is revealed in novel Fahrenheit 451. He understood the lure of technology. Because of its addictive nature (adverbial clause), Bradbury recognized that once technological devices are introduced to society, people will have trouble pulling themselves away. Think of the hours people spend in line, waiting to buy a product when a new I-phone or something of that nature comes out. Obsessed (adjective opener), consumers spend countless hours and extreme amounts of money to buy these devices. If modern society continues down the path it is on, personal relationships, human interaction, even simple exercise will fall by the wayside. The very nature of human existence is threatened by the technology that humans have created.



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