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Condit and Railsback: Transilience Bibliography 6/15/18 p.


This file contains the tables, followed by the appendices, followed by the references. Figures are in a separate file. Due to the way Microsoft Word Works, the endnotes to the appendices are at the end of the references.
FIGURES AND TABLES

6 Tables, 16 figures plus 1 pending


Chapter 1:

Figure 1-1 ComplexityContext17

Figure01-2Ontology
Table1-1Comm-Transplexity3.doc

Table 1-2Summary Table001B


Chapter 2:

Fig. 2-1 Inverted Pyramid (was inverted)

Fig. 2-2 OCOE

Fig. 2-3 prediction of omega minus particle


Chapter 3:

Fig 3-1 Thin section sketch

Fig 3-2 Ocean causality

Fig 3-3 Geological Interpretation

Fig 3-4 Species-Area relationships
Chapter 4

Table 4-1: Characteristics of Life

Table 4-2: Definitions of Life

Fig. 4-1 -“MICME” circuit Fig. 4-2 Lee et al. 6 networks (permission will be required, not captioned)

Fig. 4-3 complex network model (permission will be required,

NRG v 5 #2) caption says Fig 10-3

Fig. 4-4 gene/environment interactions

Chapter 5

Figure 5-1 Zinc finger diagram (permission will be required, no caption)

Table 5-1 Zinc finger conservation chart
chapter 6: Symbolic Being, Chapter 7 Basics, Chapter 8 Emerge, ch. 9 Humanists

NONE
Chapter 10

Table 10-1 Cheater detection table

Figure10-1 EPPM

???10-2 BRODY (not currently available)
Chapter 11

Figure 11.1 Motivate Model


Chapter 12:

None
Table 1-1: Complexity and Transplexity


Complexity Transplexity1
Inputs or Similar inputs Diverse inputs

components: or components or components


Feedbacks: No or unconstrained Rheostatic

feedbacks feedbacks


Observable Pattern or Organization and

results: organization functionality


Long-term Deterioration, Potentially

behavior: homogenization, self-perpetuating

or randomization
Natural Aligned atoms Life of organisms

examples: (atoms are (multiple interacting

only components) subsystems – reactions,

organelles. cells, organs, etc. –

are components)

Technological Watches and clocks “Manned” air- and space-craft

examples: (mechanical (human, mechanical,

components only) and computer components)

Human Military squads Civilizations

examples: (similar humans (diverse humans, traditions,

are components) and technologies are components)



1 Transplexity: the condition of a system with multiple components of multiple types that interact via rheostatic feedbacks to produce characteristics beyond those of the individual components or their sum, with the potential to maintain functionality and to self-perpetuate.

Table 1-2: A Summary of the Key Features of the Major Modes of Being



Mode of Being and Catch-phrase

Academic Field of Study

Characteristics of Being

Mode of Causality

Major Methods of Study

Extent of Prediction

and Control



Essentialized Physical Being: Mechanistic
Ch. 2

-Physics

-Chemistry

Ch. 2


-Time/space invariant

-Constrained pyramid of types

-Variation by degree

-Low overlap in range of forces Ch. 2



-One Cause, One Effect (OCOE)
Ch. 2

-Laws (L)

-Mathematical equations (ME)


Ch. 2

Strong prediction.

strong control

Ch. 2


Aggregate Physical Being:

Historic

Ch. 3

Natural Sciences:

-Geology


-Oceanography

-Ecology


-Astronomy

-Atmospheric

science Ch. 3


-Time/space specific

-Diffuse types

-Variation by degree, type, and context

-High overlap in range of forces

Ch. 3


-Multiple Causes, Multiple Effects (MICME)
Ch. 3

-ME

-Context-specific equations/laws

-Inductively based mathematical models

-Rigorous observation

-Interpretation Ch. 3


Variable prediction;

little control

Ch. 3


Biological Being: Opportunistic

Ch. 4


Biological Sciences:

-Biochemistry

-Genetics

-Microbiology

-Botany

-Zoology


Ch. 4 and 5

-Time/space specific

-Enormous range of populations in “shrub-like” relations

-Forces arranged in rheostatic circuits
Ch. 4


-Rheostatic MICME (functionality)

Ch. 4


-ME

-Rigorous observation

-Model organisms

-Motif-like generalizations

-Causal Chronicles
Ch. 5


Variable prediction;

some control


Ch. 5

Symbolic Being:

Fantastic

Ch. 6 and 7


-Humanities

Ch. 8
-Social Sciences

Ch. 9


-Categorization

-Converging flows

-Historical materialism

-Binarism

-Valuation

-Narrative Ch. 6

-Time-space binding

-Novelty of kinds

-Morality Ch. 7


-Effectivity

Ch. 7


-Path modeling

-Correlation

-Memory

-Innovation



-Interpretation

-Evaluation

-Descriptive explanation

Ch. 8 and 9



Prediction usually accounts for little of the variance;

restricted control

Ch. 9


Table 4-1: Characteristics of Life




Characteristic

Sources

Characteristic

Sources

Reproduction

Replication



1,4,6,10,11,14,19,20

3,5,7,13


Homeostasis

Feedback


3,11,20

9,10,13,15



Evolutionary Adaptation

Supple adaptation

Genetic program

5,6,11,14,20

2

13


Response to Environment

Open System

Sense Organs


1,3,10,11,19,20
5,10

13


Growth

Development

Differentiation


10,11,19

3,5,20


1,3

Movement

Representationally

guided movement

devices


10,17,19,20,21

1


Boundary Maintenance

Absorption/excretion

Membranes

(cell walls)

Composed of cells

4

8


3,20

Energy Utilization

Negative entropy

Metabolism

Dissipative

structure


3,4,5

6,18


1,10,11,13,14,19,20

10


Control

Regulatory

mechanisms


4,12

13


Function/purpose

Teleonomic



1,12

13


Chemical Uniqueness

10l13

Vitality

16,21


Order

Nonrandom pattern

Highly complex

Functional

organization

Hierarchical




3,5,17,18,21

6

4,13



4
5,10,12

11


(Other)

Uniqueness/variability

Dual level change

Life cycle/Historical

Limited order of

magnitude

Quality not quantity

Indeterminacy

Self maintenance

Repair


Change

13

13



13

13
13

13

19

19



19

1 Agar (1997) 12 Maynard Smith (1986)

2 Bedau (1998) 13 Mayr (1982)

3 Brum, McKane, Karp (1994) 14 Purves & Orians (1983)

4 Cambridge (1999) 15 Rosenberg (1985)

5 Campbell, Reece & Mitchell (1999) 16 Rowe (1992)

6 Chao (2000) 17 Schejter & Agassi (1994)

7 Dix (1983) 18 Schrödinger (1946)

8 Hoffmeyer (2000) 19 Sherman and Sherman (1989)

9 Illich (1994) 20 Solomon & Berg (1995)

10 Korzeniewski (2001) 21 van der Steen (1997)

11 Lange (1996)

Table 4-2: Some Definitions of Life

Erwin Shrodinger (1946, p. 74 CK):

A living entity “goes on ‘doing something: moving, exchanging matter with its environment, and so forth, and that for a much longer period than we would expect an inert piece of matter to ‘keep going’ under similar circumstances.”

Maturana & Varela, (1980, p. 82):

“Autopoiesis is necessary and sufficient to characterize the organization of living systems”


Maynard Smith (1986, p. 9):

“The ability of like to beget like is the most fundamental characteristic of life.”


Black’s Legal Dictionary (1990, 6th ed., p. 923):

“The sum of the forces by which death is resisted”


Rowe (1992, p. 394):

“A creative animating process, life is an expression of the blue planet and its 4.6 billion years of evolution.”


Scheiter & Agassi, (1994, p. 104, 105):

“The (entropically unfavorable) permanent transfer of matter against a gradient.”

“The characteristic of living beings is that they are able to transform their ecological coordinates in the biosphere, so that they exist at all times in a viable ecosystem”

van der Steen (1997, p. 278):

“There are many candidate-units of life: individual organisms in evolutionary process, genes, species, the entire phylogenetic tree of organisms, ecosystems, indeed the earth itself (Lovelock, 1988 Schneider and Boston, 1991). Different contexts may require different concepts of life.”
Korzeniewski (2001, p. 277):

“a living individual is …a system of inferior negative feedbacks subordinated to (being at service of) a superior positive feedback.”



Table 5-1: Peroxin 7 Orthologues in Four Species

Organism






























































Humans

V

C

G

G

A

A

R

M

L

R

T

P

G

R

H

G

Y

A

A

E

Fly

-

-

-

M

Q

T

Q

T

H

T

T


T

D

R

H

G

Y

S

L

R

Plant

-

-

-

-

-

-

M

P

V

F

K

A

P

F

N

G

Y

S

V

K

Yeast

-

-

-

-

-

M

L

R

Y

H

M

Q

G

F

S

G

Y

G

V

Q

Conserved?





























2




2

22

2

4

4

2

2






Organism






























































Humans


F

S

P

Y

L

P

G

R

L

A

C

A

T

A

Q

H

Y

G

L

A

G

Fly

F

S

P

F

E

A

N

Y

L

L

L

A

T

S

Q

L

Y

G

L

A

G

Plant

F

S

P

F

Y

E

S

R

L

A

V

A


T

A

Q

N

F

G

L

L

G

Yeast

Y

S

P

F

F

D

N

R

L

A

V

A

A

G

S

N

F

G

L

V

G

Conserved?

3

4

4

3










3

4

3

2

4

3

2

3

2

22

4

4

2

4



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