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FOR STUDENTS OF

THE REAL WORLD.







SYLLABUS FOR CJSA 1317

Juvenile Justice System

Semester Hours Credit: 3

Lecture Hours: 48
Course Dates/Days/Times: 08JUN14-20JUL14

Sundays/Tuesdays @ 1800-2100

Instructor: Missy Winterfeldt

Office Hours: Sat/Mon 1100-1300; BLDG 149

Instructor Email: Melissa.m.winterfeldt.mil@mail.mil

Phone: 318-430-8751



INSTRUCTOR BIOGRAPHY

I graduated in 2005 from UWEC with a Bachelor’s degree in both Psychology and Criminal Justice, and also attended the Law Enforcement Academy at CVTC in 2006. I completed my Master’s Degree in Criminal Justice at UW-Platteville carrying a 4.0 GPA, and studying for a Master’s Degree in Business Administration/Strategic Organizational Management at American Military University.

I have held multiple positions in criminal justice and law enforcement, ranging from Deputy Sheriff to AODA counselor in a prison boot camp, to Police Chief. I have also held numerous jobs in the military, acting in a Captain position since first commissioning as a Military Police. In addition, I have numerous additional certifications to include but not limited to: Combat Lifesaver Certification, Radar Certification, FBI UCR Training (NIBRS I), Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs Expertise, PBT Certification & PBT calibration certified, Restorative Justice training, Antiterrorism Officer Level II, and Pyrotechnics certification.


I. INTRODUCTION


  1. This course is a study of the juvenile justice process. Topics include specialized juvenile laws, role of the juvenile law, role of the juvenile courts, role of police agencies, role of correctional agencies, and theories concerning delinquency.

B. This course is not chronologically dependent upon other Law Enforcement courses. It is a required course for the Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice degree program.


C. This course is occupationally related and serves in preparation for careers in criminal justice, law enforcement, and corrections.
D. Prerequisite(s): (None)
II. LEARNING OUTCOMES
Upon successful completion of this course, Juvenile Justice System, the student will:


  1. Describe the juvenile law and the role of juvenile law and the role of juvenile courts.




  1. Explain the roles of police and correctional agencies concerning delinquency.




  1. Review and contrast the theories of delinquent conduct.


III. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

A. Textbook: Fritsch. Juvenile Justice: Policies, Programs and Practices. 3rd, McGraw/Glencoe, 2010.


B. References:



  1. Champion, Dean J, The Juvenile Justice System: Delinquency, Processing, and the Law, 4th Ed, Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2004.
  2. Kratocoski, Peter C., Lucille Dunn Dratcoski, Juvenile Delinquency, 5th Ed, Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2003.


  3. Chesney-Lind, Meda, Randall G. Shelden, Girls, Delinquency, and Juvenile Justice, 3rd Ed, Belmont, Ca: Wadsworth, 2003.

  4. Shelden, Randall G., Sharon K. Tracy, William B. Brown, Youth Gangs in American Society, 3rd Ed, Belmont, Ca: Wadsworth, 2003.

  5. Clement, Mary, The Juvenile Justice System: Law and Process, 2nd Ed, Woburn, MA: Buttersworth-Heinemann, 2001.

  6. Cox, Steven M., John J. Conrad, Jennifer M. Allen, Juvenile Justice: A Guide to Theory and Practice, 5th Ed, New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 2003.

  7. Siegal, Larry and Joseph Senna, Juvenile Delinquency, 8th Ed, St. Paul, MN: West Pub, 2002.


IV. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

A. Your first responsibility is scholarship. The grade you receive for this course will not be the grade of the instructor, but rather the grade you and you alone make.

B. You should attend class regularly and be prepared to participate in classroom discussions and to take unannounced quizzes relating to text assignments and lecture material presented from the beginning of the course. Please refer to ‘Class Attendance and Course Progress’ under the Academic Policies section in our current CTC Course Catalog: http://www.ctcd.edu/catintro.htm

C. You are encouraged to give your best effort throughout the course. From the beginning, you should plan for a steady, organized, and continuous effort, which in the long run will prove more effective for your final grade than a last minute crash-cram policy. Your course grade is not determined solely by exam grade. Such factors as class participation, initiative, attendance, and individual research papers or projects will be considered in grade computation.

D. From time to time, special library and/or outside assignments will be made to members of the class individually and/or in groups. You are expected to read all assignments and fulfill your responsibilities to any group assignment.

E. You are expected to read all assigned material and bring your textbook/reading materials to class. Keep informed on all assignments, especially after an absence.

F. Good class notes are indispensable for earning a good grade, since both the material assigned and that discussed in class will be the basis for examination material.

G. Scholastic Honesty: All students are required and expected to maintain the highest standards of scholastic honesty in the preparation of all coursework and during examinations. The following are considered examples of scholastic dishonesty:


Plagiarism: The taking of passages from the writing of others without giving proper credit to the sources.

Collusion: Using another’s work as one’s own, or working together with another person in the preparation of work, unless such joint preparation is specifically approved in advance by the instructor.

Cheating: Giving or receiving information on examinations.

H. Special Work: A term paper or other project, per requirements of the instructor, will be required. The subject must be appropriate for the course material. Check with the instructor when you have made a selection. The value is indicated in the semester grade computation and has considerable weight on your final average.



V. EXAMINATIONS
A. There will be a minimum of two major examinations and a written paper or project as follows:

1. Mid-term exam on June 29, 2014

2. Final exam on July 15, 2014

3. Paper or Projects due on July 27-29, 2014


B. A student must be present for all examinations. Students who know in advance that they will be absent from an examination due to valid reasons must arrange to take an early examination. Unexpected absences due to illness or extenuating circumstances will require the student to see the instructor about individual make-up work.
C. Students without excused absences will be given a zero for the missed examination.
D. Examinations will consist of both objective (true/false, multiple choice, fill in-the-blank, and matching) and subjective (short answer and essay) questions. Students must be able to communicate both orally and in written form, thus some questions requiring the composition and writing of an essay answer will be required.

VI. SEMESTER GRADE COMPUTATIONS

EXAM POINTS GRADES

Mid Term 200 A=4 pts/sem hr

Final Exam 200 B=3 pts/sem hr

Project 200 C=2 pts/sem hr

Assignments/quizzes 200 D=1 pt/sem hr

Participation/ attendance 200 F=0 pts/sem hr



TOTAL 1000
Three points are deducted for each unexcused absence. Military assignments or unavoidable circumstances will be evaluated upon notification of the instructor.
VII. NOTES AND ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTIONS FROM COURSE INSTRUCTOR


  1. Tuition refunds are made only in the case of class cancellation or official and timely withdrawal from CTC or from a course. Please refer to the current course catalog for more details, at http://europe.ctcd.edu/library/catalog.php.

  2. GoArmyEd students should contact their education counselor before withdrawing and are required to withdraw through the GoArmyEd portal.

Please note: a military withdrawal does not override CTC’s grading policy.

    1. For self-pay students, refunds are computed from the date the Application for

    2. Withdrawal or Refund is filed with the CTC Field Representative or designated Student

    3. Services Officer. Special conditions apply to students who receive federal, state, and/or

    4. institutional financial aid.

Tuition and fees paid directly to the Institution by the Veterans Administration, Title IV (Financial Aid Programs, a sponsor, donor, or scholarship shall be refunded to the source rather than directly to the students.



  1. Course Withdrawals, Student Responsibilities: It is the student’s responsibility to officially withdraw from a course. The instructor cannot initiate a withdrawal based upon a student’s request. Rather, students must initiate the withdrawal with the designated Education Center Representa­tive, through the CTC Field Representative or the Student Services Officer for that region.

Applications for Withdrawal will be accepted at any time before the completion of 75% of the course, after which time the student will be assigned an “FN”- “Failure for Non-attendance.”


  1. Incomplete / Course in Progress Grade Policy: An “IP” or “Incomplete” grade may be assigned by an instructor if a student has made satisfactory progress in a course with the exception of a major quiz, final exam, or other project. The “IP” grade may also be assigned based on circumstances beyond a student’s control, such as personal illness, death in the immediate family, or military orders. Notice of absences, with supporting documentation, may be required by the instructor. The instructor makes the final decision concerning the granting of the incomplete grade. With an “Incomplete” grade, students are required to complete a set amount of work before the instructor will submit an official letter grade. This date can be determined by the instructor but must be within 45 days of the course end date. After completion of the work the instructor can then change the grade of “IP” to the appropriate letter grade. If this work is not completed by the specified date the instructor will change the grade to “F”.
  2. Cellular phones, beepers, and other electronic devices will be turned off while the student is in the classroom or laboratory unless the student is using the device for class purposes. No texting or social networking is allowed during class.


  3. Instructor Discretion: The instructor reserves the right of final decision in course requirements.

  4. Civility: Individuals are expected to be cognizant of what a constructive educational experience is and respectful of those participating in a learning environment. Failure to do so can result in disciplinary action up to and including expulsion.


VIII. COURSE OUTLINE

Note:


The instructor has the right to change the course schedule. Any changes will be announced in class. If the student misses a class period and changes are announced, it is the student’s responsibility to receive the missed information from a classmate or the instructor.
JUNE 8, 2014 (Class intro/syllabus/guidance)
A. Unit One: Chapter 1, The Juvenile Justice System

1. Unit objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will:

a. Describe the jurisdiction of the juvenile court.

b. Explain what is meant by delinquency.

c. Explain what is meant by status offences.

d. Compare the ways in which the various states define a juvenile.

e. Identify and define the unique terms used in the juvenile justice system.

f. Outline the three major steps in the juvenile justice process.

g. Describe the five decision points in the juvenile justice process.

h. compare and contrast the juvenile and criminal justice system.

2. Learning Activities:

a. Discuss course requirements and activities

b. Classroom lecture/discussion

* http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/28/movies/kids-for-cash-directed-by-robert-may.html?_r=0; http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/juvenile/bench/race.html; http://abcnews.go.com/Primetime/video/primetime-crime-new-model-for-juvenile-justice-16063132;

c. Reading assignment: Chapter 1

d. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor

* http://www.cteonline.org/portal/default/Curriculum/Viewer/Curriculum?action=2&cmobjid=293526&view=viewer&refcmobjid=293525; http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/2000/2/00.02.05.x.html#f


JUNE 10, 2014

B. Unit Two: Chapter 2, History of the Juvenile Justice System

1. Unit Objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will:

a. Describe how juvenile offenders were treated by the law throughout history.

b. Identify the early institutions of juvenile justice.

c. Explain the forces behind the creation of the juvenile justice system in the United States.

d. Outline the three major historical periods in juvenile justice.

e. Identify assumptions of the due process model of juvenile justice.

f. Describe how changing assumptions affect the juvenile justice system.

2. Learning Activities:

a. Classroom lecture/discussion



http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/juvenile/; http://abcnews.go.com/US/story?id=93887&page=1; http://abcnews.go.com/2020/pa-supreme-court-throws-thousands-juvenile-delinquency-cases/story?id=8952028&singlePage=true; http://abcnews.go.com/Primetime/video/primetime-crime-new-model-for-juvenile-justice-16063132; http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/life-prison-juvenile-offenders-adult-courts/story?id=11129594

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 2

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor

C. Unit Three: Chapter 3, Juvenile Crime, Criminals, and Victims

1. Unit Objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will:

a. Identify three main ways that juvenile crime is measured in the United States.

b. Analyze strengths and weaknesses of victimization surveys and self-reports for juvenile crime.

c. Demonstrate an understanding of juvenile crime and victimization in the United States.

d. Describe the concepts of risk factor and protective factor.

e. List the various risk and protective factors and explain how these relate to juvenile delinquency.

2. Learning Activities:

a. Classroom lecture/discussion

* http://abcnews.go.com/Business/video/leads-delinquency-1753155; http://abcnews.go.com/US/video/ohio-high-school-shooting-student-dead-15801251; http://abcnews.go.com/2020/TheLaw/video/teen-killer-juvenile-justice-2020-chris-cuomo-crime-punishment-youth-12098357; http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/video/steubenville-rape-trial-high-school-football-players-guilty-18749874; http://abcnews.go.com/US/video?id=6298017

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 3

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor

* Discuss class project ideas (juvenile offender presentations)



JUNE 15, 2014

D. Unit Four: Chapter 4, Choice, Deterrence, Biological and Psychological Theories

1. Unit Objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will:

a. Contrast the classical and positive schools of criminological thought.

b. Understand choice theory.

c. Understand deterrence theory.

d. Explain Lombroso’s atavism theory and Sheldon’s somatotype theory.

e. Summarize twin and adoption studies.

f. Describe biochemical and neurological factors that impact delinquency.

g. Identify the major arguments presented by psychoanalytic theory.

h. Describe the relationship between moral development and delinquency.

i. Summarize the three major learning theories.

2. Learning Activities:

a. Classroom lecture/discussion

* http://abcnews.go.com/US/video?id=3716835

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 4

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor

JUNE17, 2014
E. Unit Five: Chapter 5, Social Structure, Social Process, and Social Reaction Theories

1. Unit Objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will:

a. Define and contrast the three types of social theories of delinquency.

b. Describe three social structure theories.

c. Summarize three learning theories.

d. Describe three social control theories.

e. Explain labeling theory.

f. Explain conflict theory.

2. Learning Activities:

a. Classroom lecture/discussion

* http://abcnews.go.com/Business/video/leads-delinquency-1753155

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 5

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor

* paper based on movie clip


F. Unit Six: Chapter 6, Delinquency Prevention and Intervention

1. Unit Objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will:

a. Describe the different types of delinquency prevention programs.

b. Explain the concept of diversion.

c. Describe the different areas of delinquency prevention programs.

d. Describe the types of programs that generally do not work in delinquency prevention.

2. Learning Activities:

a. Classroom lecture/discussion

* http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/video?id=8514359; http://abcnews.go.com/Primetime/video?id=8508870

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 6

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor

JUNE 22, 2013
G. Unit Seven: Chapter 7, Police and Juveniles

1. Unit Objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will:

a. Explain the role of police through the history of juvenile justice.

b. Describe the various police styles.

c. Explain how the police process juvenile cases.

d. Describe the role of police in handling status offenders and abused or neglected children.

e. Explain the discretionary options a police officer can exercise in juvenile cases.

f. List factors that influence police decisions in juvenile cases.

g. Compare police attitudes about juveniles with juveniles’ attitudes about police.

h. Identify some intervention programs operated by police agencies.

i. Explain how community-oriented policing affects juvenile cases.

2. Learning Activities:

a. Classroom lecture/discussion

* http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/video/juveniles-stopped-police-admit-burying-body-22857687

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 7

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor




JUNE 22, 2014

H. Unit Eight: Chapter 8, Juvenile Law and Procedure

1. Unit Objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will:

a. List the changes in rights and procedures since the due process revolution.

b. Describe four landmark Supreme Court cases on juvenile justice.

c. Explain what totality of circumstances means.

d. List situations where a juvenile is entitled to an attorney.

e. Describe the different ways police are allowed to handle juveniles.

f. Define confidentiality and anonymity.

g. Explain current legal issues in juvenile justice.

h. Compare rights and procedures in an adult criminal trial with rights and procedures in juvenile proceedings.

2. Learning Activities:

a. Classroom lecture/discussion


http://abcnews.go.com/Primetime/video?id=8533312; http://abcnews.go.com/Nightline/video/teen-sexually-assaulted-threatened-jail-17046124

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 8

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor

* Juvenile Law Jeopardy


JUNE 24, 2014

I. Unit Nine: Chapter 9, The Juvenile Court

1. Unit Objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will:


a. Describe the jurisdiction of the juvenile court.

b. Describe juvenile court key personnel and their primary responsibilities.

c. List the major steps in the juvenile court process.

d. Explain what occurs during the decision to detain and the decision to petition a case.

e. Describe decisions made by the prosecutor.

f. Explain what happens during adjudication.

g. Describe a predisposition report.

h. Analyze what occurs at a disposition hearing.

2. Learning Activities:

a. Classroom lecture/discussion

* http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/video?id=8964038

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 9

c. Mid-term examination

d. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor

* Convicted at 14 (http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/featured_articles/17MURP.html)

* case studies


J. Unit Ten: Chapter 10, Juveniles in the Criminal Justice System

1. Unit Objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will:

a. Explain what a waiver to adult court is.

b. Name the main purposes for waiving a juvenile to adult court and explain the process.

c. Compare and contrast the three main types of waiver to adult court.

d. List the deciding factors in waiving a juvenile to adult court.

e. Evaluate the effectiveness of the waiver to adult court.

f. Describe and contrast the five types of blended sentencing.

g. Analyze major United States Supreme court cases that address the constitutionality of the death penalty for juvenile offenders.

2. Learning Activities:

a. Classroom lecture/discussion

* http://abcnews.go.com/WNT/video?id=9038882; http://abcnews.go.com/2020/video?id=7183391

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 10

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor

* case studies


JUNE 29, 2014
K. Unit Eleven: Chapter 11, Community-Based Corrections for Juveniles

1. Unit Objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will:

a. Describe the differences between juvenile community corrections and institutional corrections.

b. Identify the different correctional sanctions available to the juvenile court.

c. Explain the juvenile probation process.

d. Identify typical juvenile probation conditions.

e. Describe the duties and responsibilities of probation officers.

f. Identify and explain the variations in juvenile probation.

g. Describe what Intensive Supervision Probation (ISP) is and which juveniles are eligible for ISP.

h. Identify and explain alternative sanctions available to the juvenile court.

i. Describe what aftercare services are provided for juveniles released from secure incarceration.

2. Learning Activities:

a. Classroom lecture/discussion

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 11

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor


L. Unit Twelve: Chapter 12, Institutional Corrections for Juveniles

1. Unit Objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will:

a. List differences between detained juveniles and committed juveniles.

b. Profile the typical juvenile who is sent to an out-of-home placement facility.

c. Explain the differences between public and private facilities.

d. Describe the different types of secure institutional facilities.

e. Explain the nature of juvenile detention facilities and processing procedures.

f. Outline what is meant by a short-term secure facility.

g. Describe what boot camps are designed to do.

h. Explain what youth ranches and camps are.

i. Summarize the nature of state institutions and schools.

j. Outline the various types of programming that occur in juvenile institutions.

2. Learning Activities:

a. Classroom lecture/discussion

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 12

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor

JULY 1, 2014
M. Unit Thirteen: Chapter 13, Gangs and Delinquency

1. Unit Objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will:

a. Explain the difficulties in accurately defining a gang, gang member, and gang-related crime.

b. Describe the extent of the gang problem.

c. Differentiate between types of gangs.

d. Identify the major characteristics of gangs.

e. Explain why youths join gangs.

f. Describe the major responses to gangs.

g. Summarize efforts to control gang activity.

2. Learning Activities:

a. Classroom lecture/discussion

* http://abcnews.go.com/WNT/video/gangs-paradise-2890561; http://abcnews.go.com/WNT/video/gangs-paradise-2890561; http://abcnews.go.com/US/video?id=3698376

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 13

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor



JULY 6, 2014

N. Unit Fourteen: Chapter 14, Special Populations

1. Unit Objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit, the students

a. Describe Generation X and its potential impact on the juvenile justice system.

b. Explain the difference between a rampage killing and a typical homicide.

c. Define paraphernalia.

d. Explain the concept of a chronic juvenile offender.

e. Describe the demographic profile of the juvenile hacker.

f. List the categories of hate groups and explain their attractiveness for juveniles.

g. Learn what the most common kind of child abuse is.

h. Describe the worlds of child prostitution and child exploitation.

2. Learning Activities:

a. Classroom lecture/discussion

*The Bully Project

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 14

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor

JULY 8, 2014

O. Unit Fifteen: Future Directions in Juvenile Justice

1. Unit Objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit, the students


a. Identify the current trend in the legislation and philosophy of juvenile justice.

b. Describe the BARJ model of juvenile justice.

c. Outline the arguments both for and against abolishing the juvenile justice system.

d. Identify the three major types of specialty courts used in juvenile justice.

e. Describe Project CRAFT and discuss its success as an intervention strategy.

f. Describe the parental liability movement in juvenile justice.

2. Learning Activities:

a. Classroom lecture/discussion

b. Reading assignment: Chapter 15

c. Homework and other assignments designated by the instructor


JULY 13, 2014

P. Unit Sixteen: Final exam review
JULY 15, 2014
Q. Final Examination

1. Examination instructions and procedure for grade notification



2. Final Exam
JULY 20- 29
R. Final Projects and presentations

CJSA 1317 of


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