Grade 2 Using Natural Resources



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Using Natural Resources Teaching Guide Grade 2

Grade 2

Using Natural Resources
During these learning experiences, students explore their natural world by observing, classifying, and manipulating natural objects found in their area. Students use these observations to determine possible uses for the natural resources found around them.
Through direct manipulation of their natural world, students discover that objects found in nature have very different physical characteristics. Some objects are heavy, while others are light. Some are rough and large, while others are soft and small. Students learn that these differences are based upon the composition of the natural resource. While observing the characteristics, students learn that scientists use these properties to classify and rank resources such as rocks. Students use the classification of these resources to predict their use. The opportunity to conduct tests, collect data, and creatively manipulate objects found in their area, allow students to further understand the world around them.

Using Natural Resources Teaching Guide Grade 2
Overview of Learning Experiences

TEKS

    1. The Student knows that organisms, objects, and events have properties and patterns. The student is expected to: (A) Classify and sequence organisms, objects, and events based on properties and patterns.
    1. The student knows that the natural world includes rocks, soil, water, and gases of the atmosphere. The student is expected to: (B) Identify uses of natural resources.





Engage

  • Students take a nature walk to locate natural resources found around the playground.

  • Students sort, classify, and name the groups according to the object’s physical properties.

Explore

  • Students manipulate various materials and use rock’s physical property of hardness to order several rock samples from hardest to softest.

Explain

  • Students listen to a book describing the composition and use of rocks in the past and present.

  • Students illustrate their understanding of rock use by drawing examples of ways rocks are used in the past and present.

Elaborate

  • Students apply their knowledge of the uses of natural resources by listing good house building materials and drawing the resulting home.

  • Students listen to two stories and analyze the effectiveness and use of the house building materials in the stories.

  • Students develop the criteria of good house building materials and design/build a model demonstrating the effectiveness of those materials.

  • Students analyze the available materials in a given area and compare to the materials in the area they live.

Evaluate

  • Students manipulate an unknown rock sample and hand lens to determine the physical properties of the sample.
  • Students predict possible uses for the unknown sample and demonstrate their understanding of those uses by illustrating and explaining the use.


Using Natural Resources Teaching Guide Grade 2
Targeted Texas Essential Knowledge & Skills



Science TEKS
2.1 The student conducts classroom and field investigations following home and school safety procedures. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate safe practices during classroom and field investigations; and

(B) learn how to use and conserve resources and dispose of materials.

2.2 The student develops abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry in the field and the classroom. The student is expected to:

(A) ask questions about organisms, objects, and events;

(B) plan and conduct simple descriptive investigations;

(C) compare results of investigations with what students and scientists know about the world;

(D) gather information using simple equipment and tools to extend the senses;

2.3 The student knows that information and critical thinking are used in making decisions. The student is expected to:

(A) make decisions using information;



2.4 The student uses age-appropriate tools and models to verify that organisms and objects and parts of organisms and objects can be observed, described, and measured. The student is expected to:

(A) collect information using tools including rulers, meter sticks, measuring cups, clocks, hand lenses, computers, thermometers, and balances; and


2.5 The student knows that organisms, objects, and events have properties and patterns. The student is expected to:

(B) identify, predict, replicate, and create patterns including those seen in charts, graphs, and numbers.


2.10 The student knows that the natural world includes rocks, soil, water, and gases of the atmosphere. The student is expected to:

(B) identify uses of natural resources.



Using Natural Resources Teaching Guide Grade 2


Language Arts TEKS

2.1 Listening/speaking/purposes. The student listens attentively and engages in a variety of oral language experiences. The student is expected to:
(A) determine the purposes for listening such as to get information, to solve problems, and to enjoy and appreciate
(C) participate in rhymes, songs, conversations, and discussions
(D) listen critically to interpret and evaluate
2.4 Listening/speaking/communication. The student communicates clearly by putting thoughts and feelings into spoken words. The student is expected to:
(A) use vocabulary to describe clearly ideas, feelings, and experiences
(B) clarify and support spoken messages using appropriate props such as objects, pictures, and props.
2.7 Reading/vocabulary development. The student develops an extensive vocabulary. The student is expected to:
(A) discuss meanings of words and develop vocabulary through

meaningful/concrete experiences.


2.9 Reading/Comprehension. The student uses a variety of strategies to comprehend selections to be read aloud and selections read independently. The student is expected to:
(A) use prior knowledge to anticipate meaning and make sense of texts

(B) establish purposes for reading and listening such as to be informed, to follow directions, and to be entertained

2.10 Reading/literary/response. The student responds to various texts. The student is expected to:

Using Natural Resources Teaching Guide Grade 2
(A) respond to stories and poems in ways that reflect understanding and interpretation in discussion (speculating, questioning) in writing, and through movement, music, art, and drama
(B) demonstrate understanding of informational text in various ways such as through writing, illustrating, developing demonstrations, and using available technology
(C) support interpretations or conclusions with examples drawn from text


Mathematics TEKS

2.6 Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student uses patterns to describe relationships and make predictions. The student is expected to:
(C) identify, describe, and extend patterns to make predictions and solve problems
2.9 Measurement. The student recognizes and uses models that approximate standard units (metric and customary) of length, weight, capacity, and time. The student is expected to:
(A) measure length, capacity, and weight using concrete models that approximate standard units
2.13 Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student communicates about Grade 2 mathematics using informal language. The student is expected to:
(A) explain and record observations using objects, words, pictures, numbers and technology


Art TEKS

2.1 Perception. The student develops and organizes ideas from the environment. The student is expected to:

(A) identify variations in objects and subjects from the environment, using the senses

Using Natural Resources Teaching Guide Grade 2
(B) identify color, texture, form, line, and emphasis in nature and in the humanmade environment
2.2 Creative expression/performance. The student expresses ideas through original artworks, using a variety of media with appropriate skill. The student is expected to:
(C) identify and practice skills necessary for producing drawings, paintings, prints, constructions, and modeled forms, using a variety of materials.




Physical Education TEKS


2.1 Movement. The student demonstrates competency in fundamental movement patterns and proficiency in a few specialized movement forms. The student is expected to:
(A) travel independently in a large group while safely and quickly changing speed and direction
(B) demonstrate skills of chasing, fleeing, and dodging to avoid or catch others
2.6 Social development. The student understands basic components such as strategies and rules of structured physical activities including, but not limited to, games, sports, dance and gymnastics. The student is expected to:
(A) identify goals to be accomplished during simple games such as not getting tagged
(B) identify strategies in simple games and activities such as dodging to avoid being tagged.

Using Natural Resources Teaching Guide Grade 2

Interdisciplinary Connections




Using Natural Resources Teaching Guide Grade 2

Background Information for Teachers

Students in the second grade are naturally curious about the world around them. They should be encouraged to closely observe and inquire about their environment in order to satisfy their curiosities. Second graders begin to explore objects visually and have the capacity to classify these objects as long as it pertains to something they have directly experienced. In this learning experience, children will be given the opportunity to observe, sort, and classify, an ample variety of soils and rocks. Observations about rocks will be based upon properties such as color, shape, size and luster (shiny or dull). Observations made about soil samples should be based upon properties such as color, texture, and particle size.


Natural resources are valuable materials that come from the natural world. They can include rocks, soil, water, and atmospheric gases. Each of these materials has different physical and chemical properties which make them useful in different ways.
Rocks, existing in a variety of sizes, textures, and mineral make-up, can be useful in a variety of ways. Early man first discovered that rocks could be made into tools for things such as hunting and cooking. Today rocks are used to make roads, walls, and buildings. Some rocks are carved into beautiful sculptures or statues. Minerals, which make up the rocks that we use, can exist as gold, silver, or even our most precious of gems

Soil is a combination of organic material and rock that has been broken down into tiny pieces. The organic material can include plant debris and animal waste that accumulate on the Earth’s surface. Soil, like rock, can exist in a variety of textures, color, and particle size. A mixture of two different types of soil (sand and clay) is used to make the bricks, which will eventually make up our homes, schools, and other buildings. Probably the most important use of soil is that it provides the life force for our plants. It provides the needed stability and nutrition for the plants that will eventually be harvested for the food on our plates or woven into the clothes on our back.

Water and atmospheric gases are the chemical compounds that make up most of our natural world. Water alone takes up over 75% of the Earth’s surface. In this learning experience, students will recognize that many uses of water can include transportation for both people and products, recreational activities such as boating and swimming, cleaning, making electricity, and most importantly, providing hydration for all animals and the plants that feed us.

Using Natural Resources Teaching Guide Grade 2
Engage
Safety: Prior to taking students outside, preview the area to locate any safety concerns that should be brought up with the students. Remind the students that they should never pick up items that are unrecognizable, and under no circumstance should anything be placed in their mouths. If there are questions regarding certain finds, remind the students to always ask the teacher before handling the items.
Materials: 1 paper lunch sack per child.

1 plastic Ziploc bag per child.

Student Notebook
1. This experience requires the students to locate items on a nature scavenger

hunt. Preview the area before taking the students outside to ensure there are

plenty of items to choose from. Review all safety rules before going outside.

Explain that you are going on a nature scavenger hunt and you are to be hunting

for items that come from the Earth. Before taking the students outside, ask the

following questions:




  • What kinds of items come from the Earth? (Dirt, rocks, leaves, grass, flowers, bugs, etc.)

  • How can we tell if an item comes from the Earth? (it grows on the ground or lives outside and humans don’t make them)

  • Are there items that come from the Earth that we cannot see or touch? (air, wind, sunlight)

  • How can we tell if these items came form the Earth? (Humans don’t make them.)





  1. Explain to the students that each person will receive a paper sack and a plastic baggie. When they find an item that comes from the Earth, they should place it in the sack. Remind the students that we are only “borrowing” the items, and that if the item is living, we should not pick it up, but instead, draw a picture of the item in our notebooks. Explain to the students that some items may be very small and could spill out of the sack. If the item is too small for the sack, they should place it in the resealable baggie. Explain also that some items may be too large for the sack. If this is the case, these items should be left where they are. Only pick up the items large enough to fit in the sack or baggie.




  1. Have the students spread out and begin searching for their items. Monitor the students carefully and the items they are choosing. Remind them they should only pick up items that come from the Earth or are “NATURAL.”



Using Natural Resources Teaching Guide Grade 2



  1. After the students have had adequate time to find about 10-15 items, take them back inside to further examine their items. Ask the students to each share one item they have found and why they chose that particular item. Reiterate again that items coming from the Earth are natural and are not made by humans. Explain to the students that these items are called NATURAL RESOURCES.



  1. Explain to the students that they are now going to sort their items into groups. They should closely examine each item and decide to which group that item belongs. Once complete, ask the students: What were your groups? Are all your groups the same? How did you decide which group to place the item into? Why are some items in the same group?





  1. Ask the students to join another student and resort all of their items together. Once complete, ask students:




    • Did you have the same groups as last time?

    • Were there more or less groups? Why?

    • Did you and your partner agree on all of the groups?

    • Was their a particular item that was the most difficult to sort? Why?

    • Was there a particular item that was easiest to sort? Why?

    • How did you and your partner decide where to place the items? (Lead to physical properties)




  1. Explain to the students that Scientists use these “PHYSICAL PROPERTIES” to help them sort items found in nature.


Using Natural Resources Teaching Guide Grade 2
Explore
Materials: 1 set of 5 rocks varying in hardness per student. (The rocks should be numbered in no particular order.)

1 penny per student.

1 small piece of sandpaper per student.

1 data sheet




  1. Provide each student with 1 set of rocks, a penny, and a piece of sandpaper.

  2. Explain to the students that they will be ordering the rocks according to the physical property of hardness. Remind the students that scientists use physical properties to help them classify natural resources. To help them order the rocks, they can use the penny, sandpaper, and fingernail to determine hardness.

  3. Discuss the format of the data sheet and provide instruction on how to record the results.

  4. Allow enough time for all students to adequately manipulate the materials and classify the rocks.

Rock


Result from fingernail scratch

Result from sandpaper scratch

Result from penny scratch

Order (rank from hardest to softest)

1














2














3














4














5
















Using Natural Resources Student Page Grade 2
Name_____________________ Date____________

Rock


Result from fingernail scratch

Result from sandpaper scratch


Result from penny scratch

Order (rank from hardest to softest)

1














2














3














4














5

















Using Natural Resources Teaching Guide Grade 2
Explain
Materials: 1 copy of Let’s Go Rock Collecting by Roma Gans and Holly Keller (Illustrator)

Student’s data sheet from explore activity

Large sheet of construction paper

Crayons



  1. Gather the students together to share the results of the rock sort. Ask the following:



    • What did you learn about rocks? (They can be different colors, shapes, hardness)


    • Are all rocks the same? (no)

    • What happened to the rocks when you scratched them with your fingernail? (Some rocks came off on our hands and some did not.)

    • Why did the rocks react differently to the scratches made by your fingernail, sandpaper, and the penny? (They aren’t the same hardness)

    • Why aren’t all rocks the same hardness? (They aren’t made of the same material)

    • How do we know that rocks aren’t made of the same material? (They are different colors, sizes, and shapes)

    • How do we use rocks in our lives? (to build houses, roads, statues, etc, )




  1. Share the book, Let’s Go Rock Collecting with the students. Explain that the book will give plenty of information on rocks and what they can be used for. Ask the students to specifically listen for all the different ways that rocks were used in the past and how we use rocks today.




  1. After reading the book, explain to the students that they are going to illustrate some of the uses of rocks that were mentioned in the story. Give each student a piece of paper that has been folded in half. On one side of paper, label it past, and the other present. Ask the students to illustrate one way that rocks were used in the past and one way that rocks are used in the present. Explain to the students that they may use the ideas from the story or they may have thought of their own ideas while listening to the story.

* Note: Let’s Go Rock Collecting has come misconceptions, especially about sandstone formation.


Using Natural Resources Teaching Guide Grade 2
Elaborate

Materials: A small action figure or doll

Drawing paper

A variety of building materials such as toothpicks, clay, Legos, blocks, paper, cardboard, Styrofoam, etc.

A traditional version of The Three Little Pigs


The True Story of the Three Little Pigs, by Jon Scieszka

The Three Little Javelinas by Susan Lowell and Jim Harris (illustrator)


  1. Explain to the students that you will continue your discussion on the uses of Natural Resources. Ask the following:

  • If you were going to build a house, what material would you use?

  • What makes this a good material for building a house?




  1. Show the students a small action figure or doll. Tell the students that their job is to design a tiny model house for this “person." Have the students draw a picture of the house that they would build.




  1. Explain to the students that you will read the tale of some other house builders. Read a traditional version of The Three Little Pigs.




  1. Ask the Following:

  • What materials did the pigs use to build their houses? 

  • Why do you think they chose straw? Sticks? Bricks?

  • Look at the house that you drew. Do you think that the wolf could have blown your house down? Why or why not?

  1. Read The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka, in which the tale is retold from the wolf's perspective. In this version of the story, the wolf suggests that he unintentionally sneezed on the houses, which were only destroyed because of the shabby building materials that the pigs used. Ask the following questions:

  • Do you agree with the wolf when he says that the pigs used poor building materials? 

  • Which pig(s) chose a poor material for building a house?
  • What makes this a poor building material?


  • What other materials could they have used? (Create a list of student ideas.)

  • If you were going to build a house for the pigs, what material would you choose?

  • What makes this a good material for building a house?

Using Natural Resources Teaching Guide Grade 2

  • Are the materials available in the classroom? If not, where could you find them?

  • Would you need special tools to build with these materials? What kinds of tools?

  1. Show the students a small action figure or doll. Remind students that their job is to design a tiny model house for this "person." Explain that they can choose from any of the available classroom materials, but they should first spend some time investigating which materials would be the best for this task.  Work as a class to set criteria for deciding whether something is a good building material or not. Students might consider factors such as: 

  • What are the properties of the material?

  • Where can you find it? Can you find it easily?

  • Do you need to use special tools to work with this material?

  • What happens to this material when it gets wet? 

  • Is it a strong material? 

  • Is it heavy or light?

  • Cheap or expensive?

Based on the class criteria, model how students might assess a building material, using paper as an example. 

  • What makes paper a good material for building a model house? (It is light, cheap, easy to fold and bend, available in the classroom, and easy to cut and paste.)

  • Are there any problems with this material? (There could be a problem when it gets wet, it could easily catch on fire, and it is not very strong.)

Have the students work in small groups to investigate the suitability of a variety of building materials such as toothpicks, clay, Legos, blocks, paper, cardboard, plastic, Styrofoam, etc. They should ask the following: What makes this material good for building? What makes it a poor building material? Groups should then, sort the building materials into two groups: "good" and "poor." Allow students to share which materials they selected as good materials for the project and why.


  1. Have the students revisit their original sketch. Ask the following questions:

  • Would you actually be able to build the house that you drew? Why or why not? (Introduce the notion of constraints – too expensive, takes too much time, need tools, scale too large for classroom.)

  • What material will you use to build the model house and why?

Using Natural Resources Teaching Guide Grade 2

Have the students add to or change their previous sketch to show the model house that they would build based on what they know about the

available classroom materials. Have them use pictures and/or words to describe which materials they used and why. Allow students to share their sketches. Allow the students to work in groups to construct their model homes.


  1. Read The Three Little Javelinas by Susan Lowell and Jim Harris (Illustrator). In this Southwestern retelling, the javelinas construct houses out of tumbleweed, saguaro rib, and adobe. Ask the following questions:

  • Have you ever heard of these materials?

  • Are any of these materials like straw? Which? In what way is it like straw?

  • Are any of these materials like sticks or wood? Which? In what way is it like wood?

  • Are any of these materials like bricks? Which? In what way is it like a brick?

  • Can you think of other uses for these materials?

  • Why might the building materials be different in this version of the story? (Discuss the fact that different materials may be more widely available or more practical in different areas of the world.)

  • Would these be good materials for building in the part of the world where you live? Why or why not? 


Using Natural Resources Teaching Guide Grade 2

Evaluate


  1. Distribute the following materials to each student: 1 unknown rock, magnifying lens, and1 assessment web sheet.

  2. Explain to the students that will observe the unknown rock and list several physical properties that they observe. They will also make a detailed drawing of the rock in the center of the web assessment sheet. On the 4 branches of the center, the students will determine possible uses of the rock. They will describe the use, illustrate the use, and explain why the rock is able to be used in this manner.




Using Natural Resources Student Page Grade 2

Name_______________________ Date_________________



Using Natural Resources Teaching Guide Grade 2
Reading Connection

A Lucky Thing, Alice Schertle. Wendell Minor. Harcourt Brace, 1999
Thirteen poems, rhyming and free verse, celebrate the sounds, smells, and movements of natural life on a farm. The poems are accompanied by warm and whimsical watercolor paintings. California author.

Everybody Needs a Rock, Byrd Baylor. Peter Parnall. Aladdin Books, 1974.

Everybody needs to have a special rock. This book lists ten rules for finding the rock you need. Black-line sketches are highlighted with soft brown tones. This selection provides a useful connection to units on geology, rocks, and soil.


John Muir, America's Naturalist, Thomas Locker. Fulcrum, 2003

This illustrated biography of John Muir focuses on his time in Yosemite National Park. Each page has a few lines of text and a quote from Muir's writing and faces a full-page lush landscape painting. A fine introduction to the naturalist and founder of the Sierra Club.


Wump World, Bill Peet. Houghton Mifflin, 1970.
Happy days for the Wumps stop when Pollutians invade and take over the Wumps' planet. After ruining the Wump World, the Pollutians set off to seek new conquests, leaving the Wumps to rebuild their ruined world. This story stimulates thinking about how to preserve our natural resources from pollution.

Using Natural Resources Teaching Guide Grade 2

Reference
LessonPlansPage.com
Mineral Information Institute, Colorado. 2001
Natioanl Education Standards. www.nap.edu/readingroom.html
Rocks and Their Uses, Scholastic. 2004
Science NetLinks. www.sciencenetlinks.com/lessons



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