Grade 3 ela – Narrative Performance Task Assessment

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Grade 3


ELA – Narrative Performance Task Assessment
A Day in the Life: Living as an Early Northwest Coast Indian


Student Name: _________________________________

Date: ____________________
SBAC Third Grade Narrative Performance Task
Task Overview and Teacher Directions:

Title: A Day in the Life: Living as an Early Northwest Coast Indian


Part 1

Before writing a narrative story about one day in the life of a Northwest Coast Indian their age, students will be introduced to the topic through reading two informative texts and one poem, and answering research questions on the topic. Students may take notes on what they read. Students should also have access to the texts throughout the performance task. After reading, students will then respond individually to selected-response items and constructed-response items.


Part 2

Finally, students will work individually to compose a full-length narrative story about one day in the life of a Northwest Coast Indian their age, before the European settlers arrived. Students should remember to include the narrative structure of a beginning, middle and end. Students may also refer to their notes or passages as needed. Drafting and revising will be involved.


Scorable Products: Student responses to the constructed-response, selected-response and matching questions in part 1 and the essay in part 2 will be scored.

Teacher preparation/Resource requirements: The teacher should ensure that sufficient blank paper and writing utensils are available for student note taking. Teacher should conduct standard preparation, registration, etc., for computer-based testing. The testing software will include access to spell check but not to grammar check.


STUDENT DIRECTIONS

Living as an Early Northwest Coast Indian Narrative Performance Task

Task:

This school year your class has been writing to pen pals from a 3rd grade class in Yakima, Washington (see the map below). Your pen pals have been studying about the early Plateau Indians who lived in Eastern Washington. Your class has been studying the lives of the early Northwest Coast Indians who lived in the Pacific Northwest.




You live in Auburn, Washington.

Your pen pals live in Yakima, Washington.

To share your learning, your teacher has asked you to write a narrative story about one day in the life of a Northwest Coast Indian your age, before the European settlers arrived. You will send your story to your pen pal.

After you have looked at these sources, you will answer some questions about them. Briefly scan the sources and the three questions that follow. Then, go back and read the sources carefully so you will have the information you will need to answer the questions and write a narrative story.

In Part 2, you will write a narrative story using information you have read.



Directions for beginning:

You will now look at three sources. You can look at either of the sources as often as you like.


Research Questions:

After looking at the sources, use the rest of the time in Part 1 to answer three questions about them. Your answers to these questions will be scored. Also, your answers will help you think about the information you have read and looked at, which should help you write your narrative story.

You may look at the sources as often as you think it would be helpful. You may also look at your notes. Answer the questions in the spaces below them.


Note Guidelines for Source #1: Life of the Early Northwest Coast Indians

Main Idea of Section

Supporting Details

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Part 1:

Sources for Performance Task:

Source #1:

This passage is about daily life of the early Northwest Coast Indians.



Life of the Early Northwest Coast Indians



What was the land like?

The Northwest Coast region of North America is a land of mist and rain. Few days are really hot or really cold. Most days, however, are wet. Trees grew tall, and forests are lush with moss. From almost everywhere, you can hear the sound of rushing water.

The native people who settled here at least 8,000 years ago formed many tribes. Before these people met the Europeans, they had a very unique way of life. They lived completely off the natural resources around them to help them meet their needs and wants. Read on to find out what life was like for these early Northwest Coast Indians.

What did they eat?

Native Americans of the Northwest Coast didn’t farm – they didn’t have to. The forests were full of nuts, berries, and animals to hunt. The rivers were full of salmon, their main food, and other fish. People got food from the ocean as well. They caught big fish such as halibut. They even hunted walruses, seals and whales.

To cook, the Indians smoked the salmon over their fires, roasted food over an open fire, or cooked in a large pit dug in the ground that worked just like an oven.


What were their houses like?

Many people think that all Indians lived in teepees made from animal skin, but this is not true. The Northwest Coast Indians did not live in teepees because the climate was so wet. The animal skin teepees would not have kept them dry in the heavy rain. So, what did they live in?

Trees were plentiful, and the early Northwest Coast Indians did not have to move around a lot to follow animals. So, they built houses made of cedar wood. One house might be as big as 80 feet long and 50 feet wide, and it only had one very large room. Each house had several levels of sleeping stalls along the walls. In the middle of the room was a fire pit, and there was a hole in the roof to let out smoke. All the people in a house belonged to the same clan. This means they shared ancestors. Can you imagine trying to sleep with 50-60 of your closest family members all sleeping in the same room?

What did they wear?

The Indians of the Pacific Northwest even made clothing out of cedar trees: not the hard bark on the outside of the trunk, but the soft thin bark underneath. They didn’t need much to stay warm, but they did need to stay dry. Early Northwest Coast Indians wove capes and skirts from cedar bark that were water repellent. They also made cone-shaped hats that worked like umbrellas.



How did they travel?

There were no roads, and no cars, planes or trains at the time of the early Northwest Coast Indians. But they did have many waterways in the area. The Indians built large and long canoes from cedar trees to travel these waterways. Some canoes were up to 50 feet long and 8 feet wide. Each canoe could hold between 2 and 50 people and 10,000 pounds of cargo (such as fish) at one time. They also had smaller boats for single families or shorter day outings.


What kind of work did they do?

Every member of the Northwest Coast community had jobs to do. Northwest Coast Indian children were taught early on about the roles they would take on as adults, usually by observing their parents. On a typical day, a girl, for example, would learn about collecting berries and weaving cedar bark mats by watching and helping her mother. Boys, as young as age six, started fishing and hunting with their father. During the winter months, they might help the men carve items such as tools and small canoes.

Elders (older people) would also teach girls and boys about the family history and how to behave by telling the tribe’s old stories. Family was very important to the early Northwest Coast Indians.

Information based on the following sources:

McConkey, Lois. Sea and Cedar: How the Northwest Coast Indians lived. Seattle: Madrona Press, 1973.

Ansary, Mir. Northwest Coast Indians. Des Plaines: Heinemann, 2000

Sonneborn, Liz. Northwest Coast Indians. Chicago: Heinemann, 2012.

Highsmith Inc. 2006, www.teachstorypath.com


Note Guidelines for Source #2: Northwest Coast Native People

Main Idea of Stanza

Supporting Details

Stanza #1 is mostly about:

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Stanza #2 is mostly about:

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Stanza #3 is mostly about:

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Stanza #4 is mostly about:

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Stanza #5 is mostly about:

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Source #2:

This poem is about the life and culture of the early Northwest Coast Indians.



Northwest Coast Native People

By Rebecca LaBarge

We are the native people who discovered this abundant land.

Many thousands of years ago.



We are strong. We are proud.

We live on the Pacific Northwest Coast from Alaska to California.

Tlingit, Haida, Kwakiutl, Nootka, and Chinook.

We are strong. We are Proud.
We live off the land and fish from her waters. Salmon, deer, rabbit, and trout

Provide us with our food.



We are strong. We are proud.

The great forest filled with tall, red cedar trees provide us with the gifts of

Totem pole, canoes as means of travel, clothing, and homes to rest our heads.

We are strong. We are proud.
The spirits surround us and can be summoned to the earth by the shaman.

The sun, moon, rivers, mountains, and animals are our protectors.



We are strong. We are proud.

To share our wealth and to celebrate a birth, death, or wedding, we hold

A special feast, potlatch, where there is gift-giving, dancing and storytelling with our family and friends.

We are strong. We are proud.

We are the native people who live on the Pacific Northwest Coast.

We are strong. We are proud.

Note Guidelines for Source #3: What’s in a Name?

Main Idea of Paragraph

Supporting Details

Paragraph #1 is mostly about:

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Paragraph #2 is mostly about:

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Source #3:

This passage tells about the naming traditions of the early Northwest Coast people.


What’s in a Name?

How was your name chosen? Were you named after a family member? Does your name have a special meaning? Early Northwest Coast people had names with special meaning, and most of the time, they had more than one individual name during their lifetime. In some communities, a child was named on his or her first birthday, but would get another name when he or she grew up.

Each family owned several names. The names were considered valuable property. These names were passed down in the family. Only one living person could have a name at a time, though, because the early Northwest Coast people believed names and spirits were connected.

But not all names were family names. People were often named to describe their physical or personality traits. Some names came from skills, behaviors, clothing or funny stories about people.


Some Early Northwest Coast Names:

Na’ametux – Close to the Clouds

Kwa’tsagwil – Middle of the Canoe

Quelatican – Blue Horn (based on that person’s ceremonial mask)

HiyuwasclarRain Mother

Information from the following source: Highsmith Inc. 2006, www.teachstorypath.com



Questions:

1. The passage “Life of the Early Northwest Coast Indians” and the poem “Northwest Coast Native People” both show how the Indians used the land to meet their needs. Use details from both the passage and the poem to support this idea.

Write your answer in the space provided.

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2. Which topic can be found in all three sources?


  1. Northwest Coast Indians and the meaning of their names

  2. Northwest Coast Indians and why they ate salmon

  3. Northwest Coast Indians and how they used trees

  4. Northwest Coast Indians and their families

3. Match each cause on the left with the effect on the right.


The Pacific Northwest has a wet climate.

Only one living person could have a name at a time.

Northwest Coast Indians wore cone-shaped hats made from cedar.

They organized a potlatch.

Northwest Coast Indians believed names and spirits were connected.

Northwest Coast Indians wanted to share wealth and celebrate.


Student Directions for Part 2:

You will now look at your sources, take notes, and plan, draft, revise and edit your story. You may use your notes and go back to the sources. Now, read your assignment and the information about how your narrative story will be scored; then begin your work.



Your assignment:

This school year your class has been writing to pen pals from a 3rd grade class in Yakima, Washington. Your pen pals have been studying the early Plateau Indians who lived in Eastern Washington. Your class has been studying the lives of the early Northwest Coast Indians who lived in the Pacific Northwest.

Your assignment is to write a narrative story about one day in the life of a Northwest Coast Indian your age, before the European settlers arrived. You will send your story to your pen pal.

Make sure to establish a setting, narrator and/or characters and to develop your story from beginning to end.



REMEMBER: A well-written narrative story:

  • has a setting, narrator and/or characters

  • has events that logically flow from beginning to end

  • uses transitions

  • includes details, dialogue and description

  • uses clear and descriptive language

  • follows rules of writing (spelling, punctuation, and grammar)

Now begin your work on your narrative story. Manage your time carefully so that you can
  1. plan your story


  2. write your story

  3. revise and edit the final draft of your story

Word-processing tools and spell check are available to you.

For Part 2, you are being asked to write an article that is several paragraphs long. Write your response below. Remember to check your notes and your prewriting/planning as you write and then revise and edit your article.


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Scoring Information

CR #1



Sample Generic 2-point Research (Grades 3-5):

Interpret & Integrate Information Rubric (Claim 4, Target 2)

2

  • The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to locate, select, interpret and integrate information within and among sources of information.

1

  • The response gives limited evidence of the ability to locate, select, interpret and integrate information within and among sources of information.

0

  • A response gets no credit if it provides no evidence of the ability to locate, select, interpret and integrate information within and among sources of information.



Scoring Notes:

Responses may include but are not limited to:


Life of the Early Northwest Coast Indians

A. Native Americans of the Northwest Coast didn’t farm – they didn’t have to. The forests were full of nuts, berries, and animals to hunt.

B. The rivers were full of salmon, their main food, and other fish.

C. People got food from the ocean as well. They caught big fish such as halibut. They even hunted walruses, seals and whales.

D. Since trees were plentiful, the early Northwest Coast Indians built houses made of cedar wood.

E. The Indians of the Pacific Northwest even made clothing out of cedar trees.

F. The Indians built large and long canoes from cedar trees to travel these waterways.


Northwest Coast Native People

A. We live off the land and fish from her waters. Salmon, deer, rabbit, and trout provide us with our food.


B. Red cedar trees provide us with the gifts of totem pole, canoes as means of travel, clothing, and homes to rest our heads.

Sample 2-point Response:

In the passage “Life of the Early Northwest Coast Indian,” the author says the Indians built large canoes made from cedar trees. They also made their homes from cedar trees that grow right in the Northwest.

In the poem it says the Native People live off the land and “fish from her waters.” They ate salmon, deer, rabbit, and trout. These are all things they found in their natural environment.


Selected Response Question Answer Key

2. Which topic can be found in all three sources?



  1. Northwest Coast Indians and the meaning of their names

  2. Northwest Coast Indians and why they ate salmon

  3. Northwest Coast Indians and how they used trees



  1. Northwest Coast Indians and their families

Matching Response Question Answer Key

3. Match each cause on the left with the effect on the right.


The Pacific Northwest has a wet climate.

Only one living person could have a name at a time.

Northwest Coast Indians wore cone-shaped hats made from cedar.

They organized a potlatch.



Northwest Coast Indians believed names and spirits were connected.



Northwest Coast Indians wanted to share wealth and celebrate.




Sample Generic 4-point Narrative (Grades 3-5) Writing Rubric

Score

Establishment of Narrative Focus and Organization

Development: Language and Elaboration of Evidence

Conventions

Narrative Focus

Organization

Elaboration of Narrative

Language and Vocabulary

Conventions

4

The narrative is real or imagined, is clearly focused and maintained throughout:




The narrative, real or imagined, has an effective plot helping create unity and completeness:

  • effective, consistent use of a variety of transitional strategies



  • logical sequence of events from beginning to end



  • effective opening and closure for audience and purpose



The narrative, real or imagined, provides thorough and effective elaboration using details, dialogue, and description:


  • effective use of a variety of narrative techniques that advance the story or illustrate the experience




The narrative, real or imagined, clearly and effectively expresses experiences or events:

  • effective use of sensory, concrete, and figurative language clearly advance the purpose




The narrative, real or imagined, demonstrates a strong command of conventions:

  • few, if any, errors are present in usage and sentence formation



  • effective and consistent use of punctuation, capitalization, and spelling




3


The narrative is real or imagined, is adequately focused and generally maintained throughout:

  • adequately establishes a setting, narrator and/or characters, and point of view




The narrative, real or imagined, has an evident plot helping create a sense of unity and completeness, though there may be minor flaws and some ideas may be loosely connected:

  • adequate use of a variety of transitional strategies



  • adequate sequence of events from beginning to end



  • adequate opening and closure for audience and purpose




The narrative, real or imagined, provides adequate elaboration using details, dialogue, and description:

  • adequate use of a variety of narrative techniques that advance the story or illustrate the experience




The narrative, real or imagined, adequately expresses experiences or events:
  • adequate use of sensory, concrete, and figurative language generally advance the purpose





The narrative, real or imagined, demonstrates an adequate command of conventions:

  • some errors in usage and sentence formation may be present, but no systematic pattern of errors is displayed



  • adequate use of punctuation, capitalization, and spelling




2


The narrative, real or imagined, is somewhat maintained and may have a minor drift in focus:

  • inconsistently establishes a setting, narrator and/or characters, and point of view


The narrative, real or imagined, has an inconsistent plot and flaws are evident:

  • inconsistent use of basic transitional strategies with little variety



  • uneven sequence of events from beginning to end



  • opening and closure, if present, are weak



  • weak connections among ideas




The narrative, real or imagined, provides uneven, cursory elaboration using partial and uneven details, dialogue and description:

  • narrative techniques, if present, are uneven and inconsistent




The narrative, real or imagined, unevenly expresses experiences or events:

  • partial of weak use of sensory, concrete, and figurative language that may not advance the purpose




The narrative, real or imagined, demonstrates a partial command of conventions:

  • frequent errors in usage may obscure meaning


  • inconsistent use of punctuation, capitalization, and spelling





1


The narrative, real or imagined, may be maintained but may provide little or no focus:

  • may be very brief



  • may have a major drift



  • focus may be confusing or ambiguous




The narrative, real or imagined, has little or no discernible plot:

  • few or no transitional strategies are evident



  • frequent extraneous ideas may intrude

The narrative, real or imagined, provides minimal elaboration using little or no details, dialogue and description:

  • use of narrative techniques is minimal, absent, in error, or irrelevant




The narrative, real or imagined, expression of ideas is vague, lacks clarity, or is confusing:

  • uses limited language




  • may have little sense of purpose




The narrative, real or imagined, demonstrates a lack of command of conventions:

  • errors are frequent and severe and meaning is often obscured




0

A response gets no credit if it provides no evidence of the ability to write full compositions demonstrating narrative strategies.

Narrative Performance Task Appendix A

Appendix A offers the classroom teacher an optional activity that will allow the teacher to extend the work the students have done on the Narrative Performance Task to also complete the requirements of the third grade CBA.


Meeting Needs and Wants CBA Task Overview and Teacher Directions:

After reading the two informational texts and one poem about the early Northwest Coast Indians for the Narrative Performance Task, students will now read one more informational text about the early Plateau Indians. Students may take notes on what they read.

After reading, students will use their notes to fill in a Venn Diagram comparing and contrasting how the early Northwest Coast Indians and the early Plateau Indians met their needs and wants. They will use their comparison to write an essay comparing how the two groups met their needs and wants with at least one similarity and one difference. Students will then explain three or more examples of how their values and customs influenced the ways the two groups met their needs and wants (at least one example per group).

STUDENT DIRECTIONS

Meeting Needs and Wants Social Studies CBA

Task:

You have read about the early Northwest Coast Indians, and you wrote a story about the day in the life of a Northwest Coast Indian your age. Now, you will read a letter your pen pal wrote about the early Plateau Indians.

You will use this information to complete a Venn Diagram comparing and contrasting the ways the Northwest Coast Indians and the Plateau Indians met their needs and wants.

Finally, you will use your notes, sources and the Venn Diagram, to write an essay comparing how the two groups met their needs and wants with at least one similarity and one difference. In your essay, you will also use three or more examples to explain how their values and customs influenced the ways the two groups met their needs and wants (at least one example per group).



Task Summary:

  1. Read about the early Plateau Indians and take notes.
  2. Complete a Venn Diagram comparing the Northwest Coast Indians and Plateau Indians.


  3. Write an essay comparing the two groups and examples of how their values and customs influenced the ways they met their needs and wants.

Note Guidelines: Pen Pal Letter about the Plateau Indians

Main Idea of Section

Supporting Details

Land

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Food


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Housing


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Clothing


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Travel


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  • ________________________

Family Jobs


  • ________________________

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  • ________________________

  • ________________________

This is a letter from your pen pal about the early Plateau Indians.

October 24, 2013

Dear Friend,

Thank you for your story about the early Northwest Coast Indian! I really enjoyed reading it. You had asked about what life was like for early Plateau Indians, and since we have been studying them for awhile, I have lots to share.

First, you wanted to know what the land was like in the Plateau region. It wasn’t lush and green and wet like the Pacific Northwest. The whole Plateau area is high above sea level. You can find dry deserts, mighty forests, snow-covered peaks, mountain meadows and deep canyons.

The Plateau Indians enjoyed many different kinds of food. Salmon was the most important food of the Plateau. They didn’t catch these salmon in the ocean, but in the rivers instead, where the salmon lay their eggs. The men hunted animals such as bears, goats, deer and elk. The Plateau Indians also gathered wild plants like camas lily bulbs and biscuit roots. The women collected blackberries and huckleberries, too.

You wanted to know what Plateau Indians lived in… well, first you need to know that the Plateau Indians moved around quite a bit to follow the animals they were hunting. They could never have a house made of cedar wood! Instead, they lived in teepees made of tule mats and spread on poles. These teepees were very moveable and provided great shelter for the Indians.

The Plateau Indians wore clothing made of leather. They made their clothes from antelope, elk or deer hides. Men usually wore leggings, and a shirt or robe. Women wore long dresses over their leggings.

Traveling for the Plateau Indians used to be in canoe, but in the 1500’s, the Spanish brought horses to the Plateau Indians. This really changed their way of life! Now they could travel far and fast in any direction. They used the horses to travel hundreds of miles to hunt and to trade with other tribes.

You said family was important to the early Northwest Coast Indians and that their parents and grandparents taught them how to do their jobs. The Plateau Indian tribes were very similar. The children got ready for their adult jobs by watching and learning from their parents. Girls learned to gather berries and weave baskets. Boys learned to hunt. There really was not a school. Everything they needed to learn came from their parents and grandparents.

I hope you enjoyed this information about the Plateau Indians! I have learned so much, and hopefully you have, too. I hope you have a great rest of your school year. Write back soon!

Sincerely,

Your Friend from Yakima

PS – My information came from the following sources:



Ansary, Mir. Plateau Indians. Chicago: Heinemann, 2000;

http://pio.wsd.wednet.edu/SAMMgrant/NativeAm/life/life.htm




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