Grade 3: Module 3A: Unit 3: Lesson 3 Planning Writing



Download 60.18 Kb.
Date conversion28.06.2018
Size60.18 Kb.






Grade 3: Module 3A: Unit 3: Lesson 3

Planning Writing: Creating a Plan for a Summary of Peter Pan


Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)

With support from peers and adults, I can use the writing process to plan, revise, and edit my writing. (W.3.5)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

  • I can use my Where/When/Who/What recording form to create a plan for writing.

  • I can plan my summary by completing a paragraph writing graphic organizer about Peter Pan.

  • Peter Pan Where/Who/What recording form

  • Paragraph Writing graphic organizers



Agenda

Teaching Notes

  1. Opening


    1. Engaging the Writer and Unpacking Learning Targets (10 minutes)

  2. Work Time

    1. Modeling and Planning the Summary: Introduction (15 minutes)

    2. Modeling and Planning the Summary: Beginning, Middle, and End (20 minutes)

    3. Modeling and Planning the Summary: Conclusion (10 minutes)

  3. Closing and Assessment

    1. Share: Back-to-Back, Face-to-Face protocol (5 minutes)

  4. Homework

    1. Lesson 3 Homework: Success and Challenge





  • This lesson takes students through a series of work steps that combines modeling the completion of the writing graphic organizer for an anchor text (Waiting for the Biblioburro) and their own completion of the paragraph writing graphic organizer for Peter Pan. Supporting students through this planning seems necessary considering the summary students are preparing to write is of a chapter book.

  • In advance: Prepare an anchor chart of the Paragraph Writing graphic organizer for modeling of Waiting for the Biblioburro.
  • Students will be more likely to choose to read the texts for the Recommended Texts library for the module or unit if there is a structure put to the “introduction” of the texts and if there is a clear expectation put on students for them to be required, or at a minimum, strongly encouraged to read them. These texts were selected as they were seen as good books to partner with the “theme” of the module. See Module 1 and 2A for a list of ideas for introducing module recommended texts to students. Provide students with a way of sharing their opinions of the recommended texts they’ve read.




Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

writing process, graphic organizer, introduction, “beginning, middle, end,” sequence, conclusion

  • Writing Process anchor chart (to display)

  • Peter Pan Who/ Where/When/What anchor chart (from Lesson 2)

  • Students’ Peter Pan Who/Where/When/What recording forms (from Lesson 2)

  • Paragraph Writing graphic organizer (one per student and one for display)

  • Waiting for the Biblioburro (text; one for teacher prop)

  • Paragraph Writing graphic organizer for Waiting for the Biblioburro anchor chart (used for modeling)

  • Homework recording form (see Lesson 1 Supporting Materials)



Opening

Meeting Students’ Needs

A. Engaging the Writer and Unpacking Learning Targets (10 minutes)
  • Gather students and invite them to pair up with a partner. Ask students to pair share the first step a writer takes when beginning a new piece of writing. Listen for students to identify steps such as: “They plan their writing,” or “They brainstorm ideas,” or “They use a graphic organizer.” Use equity sticks to solicit a few ideas from the class. If necessary, reinforce the idea that all thoughtful writers make a plan before writing, and that is exactly what they are going to do next.


  • Display the Writing Process anchor chart. Briefly review the writing process (i.e., planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing). The work today will help them plan their writing.

  • Remind students that they are going to be writing a summary about Peter Pan. Tell the class that the process of writing these summary paragraphs will begin today.

  • Post and read aloud to the first learning target: “I can use my Where/When/Who/What recording form to create a plan for writing.”

  • Display the Peter Pan Who/Where/When/What anchor chart (from Lesson 2). Remind students of their excellent work in Lesson 2 taking the 17 chapters of text and bringing the important aspects together.

  • Direct students to talk with their partner about how they think they can be successful with this learning target.






Work Time

Meeting Students’ Needs

A. Modeling and Planning the Summary: The Introduction (15 minutes)

  • Focus students on the second learning target: “I can plan my summary by completing a paragraph writing graphic organizer about Peter Pan.”

  • Distribute the Paragraph Writing graphic organizer and display a copy in preparation for modeling. Give students a few moments to examine the organizer.
  • Invite students to pair share what looks familiar and different about this graphic organizer from their previous writing work in other modules. Listen for students to notice similarities such as:


  • Students need to also notice differences such as:

    • Instead of Topic, the box at the top says “Introduction.”

    • The details are separated into beginning, middle, and end.

  • Answer any clarifying questions about the graphic organizer.

  • Tell students that you are going to model planning to write a summary with the module 1 text Waiting for the Biblioburro to help them complete their Paragraph Writing graphic organizer. Hold up the text for students to be reminded of this delightful story from Module 1.

  • The organizer has five parts: introduction, beginning, middle, end, and conclusion. To help students with their planning, use a “catch and release” model. You will model with Waiting for the Biblioburro but the modeling will be done one section at a time. You will model and use think-aloud and then students will work on their planning for that same section of the organizer.
  • Briefly model how a writer might complete the Introduction box. A think-aloud might sound like: “The first part for me to plan is the Introduction…It’s important in the first sentence that I tell my reader what book the summary is about, so I’m going to write ‘Waiting for the Biblioburro’ to help me remember that I want to include the title. Also, I want my reader to know that it’s a really good story, so I’m going to write some words that I might to use in my introduction and write them in the Introduction box.” Some possible words to write in the box are engaging, heart-warming, wonderful, and enjoyable.


  • The approach for this part of the lesson is to combine modeling, with supported planning and to break the work of the planning into chunks.

  • Consider having the most struggling students “partnered” with an adult for the times within Work Times A-C when the planning organizer gets filled in. The adult could scribe using ideas from the students, thus completing one organizer for the group. Copies can be made after the lesson for the students to have to use in Lesson 4.



Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students’ Needs

  • Continue with the think-aloud: “I think I should mention the main character or characters in my introduction, just like the summary for Rain School mentions Thomas and the summary for That Book Woman mentions Cal and the Book Woman. I’m going to write ‘Ana.’ The Rain School summary also mentions where the story happens, Chad. I’ll write ‘village in Colombia” which is where Ana lived.”

  • Students will now complete the ‘Introduction’ box on their organizers with a partner. Say something like: “Now that I’ve modeled how to complete the ‘Introduction’ part of my plan, you will work on the ‘Introduction’ box on your organizer for your summary of the book Peter Pan. Remember, you don’t need sentences.”
  • Bring students back together after five minutes. Invite students to Think-Pair-Share their ideas for their introduction and call on a few students to share their ideas. Students are likely to identify characteristics such as: “exciting,” “journey,” “adventurous,” “magical,” or “action-packed.”





Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students’ Needs

B. Modeling and Planning the Summary: The Beginning, Middle, and End (20 minutes)

  • Display the Summary Writing Targets document from Lesson 2. Draw students’ attention to two specific criteria from the Ideas section:

    - I can name most important characters and events in the text.

    - I can use details and examples from Peter Pan that support my writing and make my summary clear.


  • Remind students that the organizer has the three boxes: Beginning, Middle, and End. Tell students that it’s important for their summary to follow the flow of the story which means they need to attend to sequence. Draw students’ attention to the criteria from the Organization section:

    - I can organize my writing to follow the sequence of the story.



    Ask students to pair-share about what this target means for their planning and how the beginning-middle-end boxes will help them to plan.
  • Briefly model how a writer might complete the ‘Beginning’ box using the story Waiting for the Biblioburro. A think-aloud might sound like: “When the story began we found out that Ana loved to read that she loved stories of all kinds. She would make up stories to tell to her little brother. She had been reading the same book over and over again because there was no school where she lived. So I will bullet a few things for the Beginning box: loved to read, made up stories for brother, no school, one book.”


  • Students will now complete the ‘Beginning’ box on their organizers with their partner. Say something like: “Now that I’ve modeled how to complete the ‘Beginning’ box of my plan, you will work on that same box on your organizer. Remember you don’t write sentences. It’s more about notes of things that will be transformed into sentences when you actually begin to write your summary.”

  • Send students off to work with their partner for five minutes. Remind students to use their Peter Pan Where/Who/What recording form as a helpful tool for their summary planning.

  • Bring students back together after five minutes. Invite students to Think-Pair-Share their ideas for their beginning and call on a few students to share their ideas. Allow students to modify their organizers based on the sharing of ideas.







Work Time (continued)

Meeting Students’ Needs

  • Invite the class to take ten minutes to continue their planning and work on the ‘Middle’ and ‘End’ boxes. Make sure students understand that the ‘End’ box will relate the last part of the story and is different from a conclusion. Circulate as students work and remind them to pull out the key events from the text for their summary. Refer students to their Peter Pan Where/Who/What recording form if they need reminders about the most important events. If a student writes an event that is not significant, consider prompting with: “Tell me why that event is one of most important ones.” Students should not work on the conclusion yet.
  • Bring students back together after ten minutes. Invite students to Think-Pair-Share their ideas for the ‘Middle’ part of their organizer and call on a few students to share their ideas. Allow students to modify their organizers based on the sharing of ideas. Repeat with sharing ideas about the ‘End’ box.




Conclusion___Paragraph_Writing_Graphic_Organizer'>Conclusion_(10_minutes)'>C. Modeling and Planning the Summary: The Conclusion (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that it’s time to focus on the final part of the organizer – the conclusion. Briefly model how a writer might complete the ‘Conclusion’ box using the story Waiting for the Biblioburro. A think-aloud might sound like: “When the story ends Ana is happy because she has books again in her life. In the ‘Conclusion’ box, I’ll write: Ana happy, books in her life.”

  • Students will now complete the ‘Conclusion’ box on their organizers with their partner. Say something like: “Now that I’ve modeled how to complete the ‘Conclusion’ box of my plan, you will work on that same box on your organizer.

  • Send students off to work with their partner for five minutes.

  • Bring students back together after five minutes. Invite students to Think-Pair-Share their ideas for their conclusion and call on a few students to share their ideas. Allow students to modify their organizers based on the sharing of ideas.

  • Allow students a few final minutes to look over their Paragraph Writing graphic organizers.

  • Struggling learners will benefit from an additional opportunity to review their planning document with adult support prior to Lesson 4.
  • Use a time after this lesson for students, particularly struggling students, to “retell” the story orally using their paragraph planning document. This oral rehearsal will help students when it comes time to draft.




Closing and Assessment

Meeting Students’ Needs

A. Share: Back-to-Back, Face-to-Face protocol (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to bring their Paragraph Writing graphic organizers, gather together whole, and find a partner to share.

  • Briefly review the Back-to-Back, Face-to-Face protocol: Students will pair up and stand back-to-back. They should decide who will speak first when they turn around and face each other. On the count of three, students turn around, face their partner, and share the following:

    • What is your plan for the summary introduction?

    • What is one important event you plan to tell your reader about Peter Pan?

  • Give students a moment to think. Post and use the sentence frames: “I will introduce the book by _______. One important event I will tell my reader is _______.”

  • For students needing additional supports, consider offering a sentence frame or starter, or cloze sentence to assist with language production and provide the structure required.

    Note: Review students’ graphic organizers to assess their readiness to begin writing their summaries in Lesson 4. Students can use the Summary Writing Targets document as they draft their summaries. Review the Summary Writing rubric (for teacher reference) to have a fuller vision of all four levels of mastery. See Lesson 1 Supporting Materials. The next few lessons are centered on students’ writing summaries of Peter Pan and later, opinions about interesting characters.



Homework

Meeting Students’ Needs

  • Complete Lesson 3 Homework: Naming a Success and a Challenge. Tell students that when they write, they will often experience success with parts of their writing and challenges with other parts. Explain that successes might be things that they felt were easy for them. Other things may have been harder. Explain that it is helpful to identify what was successful and what was challenging because it helps us grow as writers.









Grade 3: Module 3A: Unit 3: Lesson 3

Supporting Materials




The Writing Process


Revise


Revise


  • Paragraph Writing Graphic Organizer




Name:__Date'>Name:

Date:

Introduction




Beginning






Middle






End






Conclusion


Paragraph Writing Graphic Organizer:

Sample for Waiting for the Biblioburro




Introduction
Book - Waiting for the Biblioburro

(delightful engaging, heart-warming, wonderful, enjoyable)


Ana – her dreams come true




Beginning
● small village in Colombia

● loved to read

● made up stories for little brother

● no school, no library

● read same book over and over





Middle

● Hears a noise (hooves)

● Two donkeys loaded with books

● A man - a librarian

● Alfa and Beto

● New books to read





End
Borrows books

● Librarian returns to her village every few weeks

● Writes a story for the librarian about him





Conclusion
● will always have books to read

● grateful to librarian



Lesson 3 Homework:

Naming a Success and a Challenge



Name:

Date:


Learning Target: I can write a plan for my Peter Pan summary.


  1. Success: One success that I had planning for my paragraph was:



















  1. Challenge: One challenge that I had planning for my paragraph was:























This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: © (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license.








The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page