Grades 6-8 ela ccgps unit plan: 2nd 9 weeks (1ST, 2ND, 3RD, or 4TH) Use your grade-level curriculum map to determine the reading and writing focuses of your unit and the numbers and types of assessments

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GRADES 6-8

ELA CCGPS UNIT PLAN: 2nd 9 WEEKS (1ST, 2ND, 3RD, OR 4TH)

Use your grade-level curriculum map to determine the reading and writing focuses of your unit and the numbers and types of assessments



READING FOCUS : Literary

THEME: Horror and Suspense



EXTENDED TEXT: The Man Who Was Poe, Avi

SHORT TEXTS (mixture literary and informational):

1. “What is Horror Fiction?” (article) http://www.horror.org/horror-is.htm
2. “The Landlady” Elements of Literature, page 171
3. “The Tell-Tale Heart” E.A. Poe
4. “The Oval Portrait” E.A. Poe
5. “The Raven” E.A. Poe (poem)
6. “The Cask of Amontillado” E. A. Poe
7. “The Horror of Werewolves” (SCOPE: Oct 31, 2011) *optional—if time permits
8. “The Monkey’s Paw” Elements of Literature, page
9. Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (excerpt)
10. Brahm Stoker’s Dracula (excerpt)
11. “The Poe Hoax” (play) *optional--if time permits
SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS:


  • Film clips of old and new horror films (*listed in tasks)
  • A&E Biography “The Mystery of Edgar Allan Poe” http://www.biography.com/people/edgar-allan-poe-9443160/videos/edgar-allan-poe-full-episode-2104513528 (OR) http://app.discoveryeducation.com/search?Ntt=edgar+allan+poe


  • Film clip of “The Landlady” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fEz39MfsLXQ

  • Film clip of “The Tell-Tale Heart” (teacher share folder, 8th grade LA, Edgar Allen Poe videos)

  • Interactive copy of “The Raven” http://www.teachersfirst.com/lessons/raven/

  • Film clip adaptation from “The Simpsons” on “The Raven” (teacher share folder, 8th grade LA, Edgar Allen Poe videos)

  • Film clip of “The Oval Portrait” http://app.discoveryeducation.com/search?Ntt=the+oval+portrait

  • Rap of “The Cask of Amontillado” http://www.flocabulary.com/poe-cask/

  • Film clip of “The Monkey’s Paw” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugjegclLNhM

  • Rap of Frankenstein http://www.flocabulary.com/frankenstein/





WRITING FOCUS: Argumentative (Argumentative or Informative/Explanatory; consult your grade-level curriculum map)


ASSESSMENT TASKS (These writing prompts will serve as the assessments for this unit.)

Informative/Explanatory writing should focus on why literary and rhetorical choices are made by the author, and how those choices are intended to affect or impact the reader based solidly in text evidence; argumentative/opinion writing must advance a specific claim or claim(s) and provide strong and logical support, based solidly in text, for claims.

1. (Formative) Journal: “How does an author create suspense in a story? What strategic elements are essential in this genre?”

2. (Formative) Journal: “What is foreshadowing? How does foreshadowing contribute to a story’s plot?” (After “The Landlady”)
2. (Formative) Journal: “How do the elements of a short story contribute to the horror genre?” (Teacher answer to guide thinking)
3. (Summative) Mini-Essay: For the “Oval Portrait” Pretend you are someone working in the painter’s home. Write a letter to the painter explaining your concerns about his wife. Use details from the story to support your concerns.”
4. (Summative) Poetry-Writing: Using “The Raven” as a model, write your own poem. Use horror and suspense as the driving theme as Poe does in “The Raven,” but focus your poem on an object or animal of your choosing.
5. (Summative) Main Essay: Letter to a judge arguing whether the narrator of “The Tell-Tale Heart” was sane at the time he committed the murder
6. (Summative) Main Essay: How has Poe’s real life events influenced his creative writing?

NOTE: AT LEAST 3 OF THE MINIMUM OF 4 ANALYSIS ESSAYS MUST BE WITH THE GENRE FOCUS IDENTIFIED FOR THE UNIT



NARRATIVE/RESEARCH/ROUTINE WRITING

NARRATIVE
Poetry-Writing: Model “The Raven”; write your own poem that is modeled for the raven. Use horror and suspense as the driving theme as Poe does in “The Raven,” but focus your poem on an object or animal of your choosing.
“The Landlady”: 911 call between Mr. Weaver and the dispatcher re: the strange events
RESEARCH
Online Scavenger Hunt: Biographical info on Poe

Video notes on Poe


Culminating Writing: How has Poe’s life events influenced his creative writing?

RESEARCH CONNECTION(S)
Understanding how a writer’s life can influence his/her creative work


ROUTINE WRITING Notes, summaries, process journals, and short responses across all genres


  • Journals/response to lit (inference, prediction, summary, opinions, real-world & self-connections)

  • Notes on horror fiction, creating suspense, foreshadowing, flashback, imagery, conflict

  • Notes on elements of a short story

  • Notes on Poe’s biographical info

  • Notes on tone and mood in “The Raven”

  • Comprehension questions

  • Vocabulary exercises






PLANS FOR ASSESSMENT 1: integrating reading selections from the unit into a writing task

PROMPT:

You are a psychiatrist writing a letter to the judge giving your opinion as to whether or not the defendant is mentally competent to stand trial. Is he mad? Or is he fully aware of his actions (murder) as he claims to be? Be sure to include evidence from the text to support your conclusion.




SKILL BUILDING TASKS

Note: tasks may take more than a single day. Include a task to teach EVERY skill students will need to succeed on the assessment prompt above. Language, Foundations, and Speaking/Listening standards must be incorporated so that all standards are adequately addressed throughout the year.

ESSENTIAL QUESTION What are some common characteristics of horror stories?


TASK: Viewing; Pre-reading; Contextualization/Activation of background knowledge for the horror & suspense genre

STANDARDS:

ELACC8SL2: Analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and evaluate the motives (e.g., social, commercial, political) behind its presentation.

ELACC8SL1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 8 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

ELACC8W8: Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

ELACC8W9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

a. Apply grade 8 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Analyze how a modern work of fiction draws on themes, patterns of events, or character types from myths, traditional stories, or religious works such as the Bible, including describing how the material is rendered new”).

b. Apply grade 8 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., “Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced”).





ELACC8W10: Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

INSTRUCTION:



  • Ask students “What makes movies so scary?” Discuss the essential elements that usually create a scary movie as well as the similarities and differences in the genre. Ask students: “Why do you think people enjoy being scared? How have scary movies changed due to the change in what we fear?”

  • Students should view 4-5 horror film clips (teacher guided). Tell students to jot down a list of common characteristics in the clips. Show excerpts from the following:

“Carrie” http://horror.about.com/od/upcomingmovie1/a/Carrie-2013.htm (Stop at 1:16 then skip to 1:45)

Synopsis: A reimagining of the classic horror tale about Carrie White, a shy girl outcast by her peers and sheltered by her deeply religious mother, who unleashes telekinetic terror on her small town after being pushed too far at her senior prom.

“Dracula” http://horror.about.com/od/vintagetrailers/tp/trailers_30s.htm

“The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” (trailer) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6O4Himch7g

“Frankenstein” (1931 clips) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8H3dFh6GA-A http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nur4g4r1LN4

(trailer of 1994 movie) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hCzI4DR_Hcw

“Friday the 13th” (1980) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UF_yl401bCc (2009) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQvel7vGbso

“Paranormal Activity 1” (trailer) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7TC9bKyDB5Y


  • After viewing clips, allow students to discuss the common characteristics they jotted on their papers. Also, discuss how these characteristics build

fear and suspense. List student responses on the board. After the class discussion, have students write the ideas discussed into a summary journal.

  • Next, as a class, look at page one of “The Thinking Reader’s Guide to Fear” by Terrence Rafferty 

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/06/04/books/review/04rafferty.html

Assign one of each of the five paragraphs to five small groups and direct them to mine their paragraph for information about the genre. Have groups



share what they’ve learned with the whole class.

  • As a ticket out the door (TOTD) Have students write 2 summary paragraphs. 1st paragraph should contain the main ideas from each group

presentation of the article. The 2nd paragraph should contain a summary paragraph of the common characteristics that students jotted down earlier.


ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How do we define horror? Then, what is horror fiction? How do authors create suspense?

TASK: Help students to have a better understanding of the horror and suspense genre.

STANDARDS:

ELACC8RI1: Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.


ELACC8RI2: Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text.

ELACC8RI3: Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories).

ELACC8RI4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.


INSTRUCTION:

  • Read “What Is Fiction?” article as a class, large-group. You will need a class set of the article. http://www.horror.org/horror-is.htm

  • Have students take notes on the definition of horror fiction and the article’s main ideas.

  • Have students discuss through pair-share their notes from the article as well as how horror fiction has changed through the years. Students should jot down three observations of these changes in their notes. Then, share with class.

  • After summarizing the article’s ideas, share with students that we will focus on primarily Edgar Allen Poe, the writer who created this genre.

  • Show Horror & Suspense PowerPoint. Have students take notes. (Teacher share folder, 8th grade LA, Horror and Suspense Unit)



ESSENTIAL QUESTION: What is foreshadowing? What purpose does foreshadowing have in a story? How does foreshadowing contribute to a successful plot?


TASK: Students will discover & discuss examples of foreshadowing in “The Landlady” by Roald Dahl.

STANDARDS:

ELACC8RL1: Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

ELACC8RL2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

ELACC8RL3: Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.




ELACC8RL6: Analyze how differences in the points of view of characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor

ELACC8RL7: Analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors.

INSTRUCTION:


  • Pre-reading discussion: review the idea of foreshadowing and its purpose in literature.

  • Read aloud “The Landlady” (Elements of Literature, page 171) with the class.

  • During reading: Ask questions to determine understanding of events. Clarify and discuss dialogue and/or vocabulary.

  • Post-reading: project text of story onto SmartBoard. Teacher discusses with students examples of foreshadowing and highlights in yellow. Then, highlights the examples of the event that was being foreshadowed in green.

  • Continue to model for students 1-2 more times on the board.

  • Ask students to partner with a neighbor so that they can now identify one example of foreshadowing that has not been discussed.

  • Call on partner groups to share examples with the class & highlight text on the board.

  • After finding foreshadowing examples, watch “The Landlady” video ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fEz39MfsLXQ ).

  • Class discussion: How is the written story similar or different to the movie? Is the movie a good adaptation of Dahl’s original story?

  • Ticket Out the Door (TOTD): After class discussion, have students write a journal summarizing the class discussion.

  • *Optional activities*: create a 911 dialogue between Mr. Weaver and the 911 dispatcher. Dialogue must include 5 lines from each person.



ESSENTIAL QUESTION: What are examples of foreshadowing in the text? What is fate & coincidence? What is the significance of the #3? What can you infer about the son at the end of the story?


TASK: Students will discover & discuss examples of foreshadowing in “The Monkey’s Paw” by W. W. Jacobs.

STANDARDS:

ELACC8RL1: Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

ELACC8RL2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

ELACC8RL3: Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.




ELACC8RL6: Analyze how differences in the points of view of characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor

ELACC8RL7: Analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors.

INSTRUCTION:


  • Pre-reading discussion: Preview vocabulary and discuss the ideas of fate vs. coincidence. Ask students, “If you had only 3 wishes, for what would you wish (not more wishes)? Then, discuss how sometimes what we wish for doesn’t turn out like we expected.


  • Read aloud “The Monkey’s Paw” (Elements of Literature, pages 186-195) with the class.

  • During reading: Before reading Scene 2, ask students to make predictions about what they think might happen. Ask questions to determine understanding of events. Clarify and discuss dialogue and/or vocabulary. Also, read aloud with students “what Does It All Add Up To? Significant Numbers”, page 191.

  • Post-reading: Ask students, “What can you infer was Mr. White’s 3rd wish? How do you know? Discuss with class Sgt. Major’s warning and how the warning foreshadows what will happen to the Whites. Have students complete and turn in the Reading Check (a-e) and Shaping Interpretations (2-4).

  • Watch video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugjegclLNhM

  • Class discussion: How is the written story similar or different to the movie? Is the movie a good adaptation of Jacobs’ original story?

  • Ticket Out the Door (TOTD): After class discussion, have students write a journal summarizing the class discussion.

  • *Optional activities*: Journals: #1 Does fate or coincidence control destiny? #2 Do you believe in good luck charms/clothing? #3 Have you ever ignored a warning & the end result was not good? #4 Do you think people can predict fate?



ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How does the author create tone and mood in a story? How do tone and mood create suspense? What are the tone and mood of “The Tell-Tale Heart”? What is the difference between sanity & insanity? What does it mean the narrator says, “Why do you say I’m mad?” What was old man’s beating heart actually representing? What is a conscience and why is it important? What can you conclude about the narrator’s character and decisions based on evidence in the text (dialogue, behavior, motives)?


TASK: Students will read “The Tell-Tale Heart” and analyze narrator’s dialogue, behavior, motives in the text. Students will determine if narrator is sane or insane using evidence in the text.

STANDARDS:

ELACC8RL1: Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.




ELACC8RL2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.







ELACC8RL3: Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.




ELACC8RL4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

ELACC8RL6: Analyze how differences in the points of view of characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor





ELACC8RL7: Analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors.

INSTRUCTION:



  • Pre-Reading: Preview vocabulary in “The Tell-Tale Heart” and discuss with class sanity vs. insanity, “gone mad.”

  • Read aloud “The Tell-Tale Heart” with class. You will need a class set of the story.

  • During reading: Students should look for examples of foreshadowing. Periodically, check for students’ comprehension of story by asking questions and clarifying vocab or events.

  • Post-Reading: Discuss with class the EQs above as well as examples of foreshadowing. Have students complete handouts from Teacher Resources for Edgar Allen Poe, pages 13, 17 (vocab), 16 (rdg comp).




ESSENTIAL QUESTION: Why is the art of persuasion important in writing? What are the components of a persuasive essay? How and why do I pre-write?

TASK: Write an essay arguing whether or not the narrator of “The Tell-Tale Heart” is mentally competent to stand trial for murder.

STANDARDS:

ELACC8W1: Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.

a. Introduce claim(s), acknowledge and distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically.





b. Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.




c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.




d. Establish and maintain a formal style.




e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.




ELACC8W4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

ELACC8W5: With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of

Language standards 1–3 up to and including grade 8.)


ELACC8W6: Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing & present the relationships between info. and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.


ELACC8W9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.




a. Apply grade 8 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Analyze how a modern work of fiction draws on themes, patterns of events, or character types from myths, traditional stories, or religious works such as the Bible, including describing how the material is rendered new”).




ELACC8W10: Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
INSTRUCTION:

  • Discuss with students the importance of pre-writing (better organization of ideas, determines flow and transitions of ideas, plan hook & thesis).

  • Discuss with students the following: hooks (attention grabbers), position statements (thesis statements), arguments (relevant reasons, explanation & examples), counter-arguments, and conclusions. Teacher can use PowerPoints, www.unitedstreaming.com , www.youtube.com videos, English book, etc. to aid in the discussion.

  • Guided Practice: Conduct an in-class discussion regarding narrator’s sanity vs. insanity in order for students to begin brainstorming the issue. Ask them for 1 example from the text of narrator’s sanity. Then, ask them for 1 example from the text of the narrator’s insanity.
  • Pre-Writing: Allow students to finish completing “Writing Corner: Diagnosis” from Teacher Resources for Edgar Allen Poe, page 22.


  • Instruct students choose evidence for sanity OR insanity. They cannot argue both sides. Students should use their pre-writes as a guide to their final draft letters to the judge. Remind students that they are psychiatrists. They are not the lawyers arguing whether or not the narrator committed the murder.

  • Students will post letters onto www.paperrater.com . Choose format option for letter. Also, they need to choose 9th grade student for the grade level. (If

Efolio is still available, teachers could use this website for scoring students’ letters as well.)

  • *Optional activities*: research & report info about deathwatch beetles, legal procedures (warrants, reasonable doubt, filing charges, arrests, court procedures, etc.); have a lawyer and/or police officer come speak to your classes regarding legal procedures; write a poem with themes or elements from the story; write a police report for the crime; draw a picture related to the story; create a music soundtrack for the movie version of the story (must be appropriate for school); create a news report including interviews with the neighbor, lawyer, police officers and/or psychiatrist.




ESSENTIAL QUESTION: What are poetic devices and how do I identify them? How does Poe’s real life seem to creep into this poem? What is the significance of the bird such as the raven?

TASK: Read “The Raven,” E.A. Poe by using the interactive poem to identify various poetic devices.

STANDARDS:

ELACC8RL1: Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.


ELACC8RL2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.




ELACC8RL3: Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

ELACC8RL4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

ELACC8RL6: Analyze how differences in the points of view of characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony, create such effects as suspense or humor).

INSTRUCTION:



  • Pre-reading: Introduce students to poetic devices by having them take notes on the discussion of terms such as consonance/assonance, internal/external rhyme, rhyme scheme, alliteration, simile, metaphor, stanzas, personification, etc. Teacher can use PowerPoints, www.unitedstreaming.com , www.youtube.com, etc. to teach devices.
  • Read aloud “The Raven” poem with the class. Use the interactive website on the SmartBoard to engage students. http://www.teachersfirst.com/lessons/raven/


  • During reading: Summarize main idea for each stanza. Discuss vocabulary, author’s purpose/intent, poetic devices used, etc.

  • Post-reading: Discuss how Poe’s real life creeps into this particular poem. Ask students, “Why does this poem appeal to so many? What made it so popular?” Also, discuss with students why Poe chose the symbol of a bird such as the raven. What is the significance of this choice?

  • Have students complete “Tone and Mood” handout for “The Raven”. Ask students to pick out vocab that create the tone and mood of the poem.

  • Have students complete “Edgar’s Similes and Metaphors” handout.

  • Have students complete the 4 page Read-Write-Think handout for “The Raven”. This handout reviews vocab, poetic elements, short story elements, setting, conflict, mood, figurative language, order of events, & text analysis.




  • Watch video: “The Simpsons” TV show version of “The Raven”. (Teacher share, 8th grade LA, Horror and Suspense Unit, EAPoe videos, Simpson Treehouse Horrors—skip to _________)

  • *Optional activities*: create a movie poster for poem




ESSENTIAL QUESTION: What does it mean to be obsessed with something or someone? Is there a difference between being passionate and obsessed? What is a theme and how do I find it in literature? Can there be more than 1 theme in a story?

TASK: Read “The Oval Portrait” by E. A. Poe. Students should identify the theme(s) in the text.

STANDARDS:

ELACC8RL1: Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.


ELACC8RL2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.




ELACC8RL3: Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

ELACC8RL4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

ELACC8RL6: Analyze how differences in the points of view of characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony, create such effects as suspense or humor).

INSTRUCTION:



  • Pre-reading: Preview vocabulary in “The Oval Portrait.” Discuss the EQs above.

  • Read aloud “The Oval Portrait” with class. You will need a class set of the story. Teachers may have copies or books for class sets.

  • During reading: Ask questions to determine students’ understanding of events. Clarify and discuss dialogue and/or vocabulary.

  • Post-reading: Have students complete handouts from Teacher Resources for Edgar Allen Poe, pages 36, 39-41.


  • Writing Activity: “Writing Corner: The Bride’s Identity”, page 44

  • *Optional activities*: research a painter (preferably Gothic); read/watch a version of “The Picture of Dorian Gray” by Oscar Wilde & compare/contrast to this story; write an obituary for the wife; as a newspaper reporter, write an article about what happened to the woman; interview the painter in the story re: what he thinks happened to his wife

ESSENTIAL QUESTION: What is an insult? How do you react to insults? Is revenge always the appropriate reaction? Why or Why not? What is irony? How does irony add to the suspense in the story?

TASK: Students will read “The Cask of Amontillado” by E. A. Poe and find examples of irony in the text.

STANDARDS:

ELACC8RL1: Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

ELACC8RL2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.



ELACC8RL3: Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

ELACC8RL4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

ELACC8RL6: Analyze how differences in the points of view of characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony, create such effects as suspense or humor).

INSTRUCTION:



  • Pre-reading: Preview vocabulary in “The Cask of Amontillado” and discuss the EQs above.

  • Read aloud “The Cask of Amontillado” with class. You will need a class set of the story.

  • During reading: Ask questions to determine students’ understanding of events. Clarify and discuss dialogue and/or vocabulary.

  • Post-reading: Have students complete handouts from Teacher Resources for Edgar Allen Poe, pages 57 & 61 (vocab), 60 (rdg comp), 62-63 (irony)

  • Writing activity: Using “Writing Corner: The Final Justice” prewrite (page 66), you are a lawyer (prosecution OR defense) who will write an opening statement explaining why Montressor must be found guilty OR innocent. Use evidence from the text to persuade the jurors.
  • *Optional activities*: Journals: #1 Why does revenge seldom pay? Do you agree with Montressor’s philosophy of revenge? Why or why not? #2 “Pride goeth before a fall.” How does this quote related to Fortunato? #3 Why is important not to impose on friends? How does it make you feel when people impose on you? What’s the difference between imposing and helping each other out?; research coats of arms/family mottos, nitre, carnivals in Italy, Masons organization; write an obituary OR eulogy for Fortunato; write a police report of the crime; create your own coat of arms and family motto





PLANS FOR ASSESSMENT 2: integrating reading selections from the unit into a writing task

PROMPT: The Man Who Was Poe is AVI’s interpretation of how E.A. Poe’s work was influenced by his life. In this essay, you will complete a similar task. Write an explanatory essay analyzing how Poe’s life affected his writing. Support your claims using evidence from the texts we have studied in this unit.


SKILL BUILDING TASKS

Note: tasks may take more than a single day. Include a task to teach EVERY skill students will need to succeed on the assessment prompt above. Language, Foundations, and Speaking/Listening standards must be incorporated so that all standards are adequately addressed throughout the year.

ESSENTIAL QUESTION: What tragedy seems to befall each woman in Poe’s life? What characterizes Poe’s writing? Why is he known as the creator and master of the horror and suspense genre?

TASK: Students will research Poe’s life to gain understanding and insight into his literature.

STANDARDS:

INSTRUCTION:



  • Take students to the computer lab to complete the Internet Scavenger Hunt handout.
  • Watch video of Poe’s biography. http://www.biography.com/people/edgar-allan-poe-9443160/videos/edgar-allan-poe-full-episode-2104513528 (OR) http://app.discoveryeducation.com/search?Ntt=edgar+allan+poe (video guide available to the Discovery Education video)


As students watch the video, they are to take notes. Teacher can use the Cornell Note-taking system or the video guide. Periodically, stop the video to discuss and/or summarize information presented. Be sure to point out how certain events (death of women, relationship with father(s), marriage) influences/characterize his writing. Also, be sure to point out Poe’s personality traits, writing accomplishments/failures, addictions, debt, questions about his death, etc.

  • After video, discuss with class how all the tragedies in his life, his personality, his relationships, etc. affected his writing. Also, discuss the mysterious circumstances surrounding his death.

  • Ticket Out the Door (TOTD): Have students write a journal summarizing the class discussion.

  • *Optional activities*: create a poster of Poe’s life; create an obituary for Poe; create a PowerPoint of Poe’s life; as a newspaper reporter, write an article about Poe; as a talk-show host, interview people who knew Poe (step-father, previous girlfriends, coworkers, gambling buddies)




ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How does the author connect the real events and tragedies from Poe’s life to the characters in The Man Who Was Poe?

TASK: Students will read The Man Who Was Poe by AVI and will analyze the text for literature elements.

STANDARDS:

ELACC8RL1: Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.



ELACC8RL2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.







ELACC8RL3: Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.




ELACC8RL4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts

ELACC8RL6: Analyze how differences in the points of view of characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor.



INSTRUCTION:



  • Prediction Guide

  • Character map

  • Large-group read-aloud

  • Comprehension checks

  • Stop at appropriate times to identify real-life connections

  • Point out foreshadowing at the end of each chapter, occasionally having students write paragraphs to predict the next chapter’s immediate events.

  • Clarify vocabulary as needed


ESSENTIAL QUESTION:

TASK:

STANDARDS:

INSTRUCTION:





ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How can I succeed on the assessment for this unit? What should I include in my prewrite for the Poe bio essay?

TASK: Students will create a prewrite for their essays.

STANDARDS:




ELACC8RL1: Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.







ELACC8RL2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.






ELACC8W4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)


ELACC8W5: With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of

Language standards 1–3 up to and including grade 8.)



ELACC8W6: Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing & present the relationships between info. and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

INSTRUCTION:



  • Discuss with class that their prewrites need to be in 1 of 3 formats: jot list, web, or outline.

  • Prewrite should include the following: hook (attention getter), thesis (position statement), topic sentences for each paragraph as well as supporting details, explanation and examples from text, and conclusion.

  • Teacher will guide students as a class in coming up with a thesis statement. Ask students, “What are the most important ideas that need to be in the paper?”; “How do we then create a declarative sentence that will allow us to talk about that information?” Encourage students to offer suggestions. As the students offer appropriate suggestions, write the sentences on the board. Pick the best sentence then ask students to reword sentence with better vocabulary.

  • Teacher will walk around to check students’ prewrites.

  • At the end of class, have students turn in prewrites.



ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How can I effectively demonstrate what I have learned in this text study?


TASK: Students will write their Poe bio essays.

STANDARDS:




ELACC8RL1: Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.







ELACC8RL2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.







ELACC8W4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

ELACC8W5: With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of

Language standards 1–3 up to and including grade 8.)


ELACC8W6: Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing & present the relationships between info and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

INSTRUCTION:



  • Students will use prewrites to guide rough drafts.

  • Students will need 2-3 days of rough drafting. Teacher can allow students to work on the draft in class or finish for homework.

  • After students complete their rough drafts, teacher will instruct them in the editing and revising process. We will use the CUPS and CRAM acronyms to remind students of how to edit and revise. Also, teacher will project specific directions of what students are required to do in this process.

Students should complete the following steps to revise papers:

  1. Box the first word in every sentence.

  • Do you begin each sentence with a different word?

  • If not, try rewording your sentences so that it is a complex structure.

  1. Underline each sentence.

    • Use colored pens, pencils or markers to alternate colors. EX: Sentence 1 is underlined with blue marker. Sentence 2 is underlined with red marker.

    • Do you have different types, lengths and structures of sentences?

(EX: a medium, complex, declarative sentence)

  1. Choose 1 verb, 1 noun and 1 adjective in each paragraph to replace. Use the thesaurus.

    • EX: walked=stumbled, said=announced, fun=exciting

    • Eliminate bad words like stuff, things, a lot, kind of
    • Are you repeating the same word over and over in your sentences?


  2. Check # of sentences in each paragraph.

    • You should have at least 5 sentences.

    • C (cut) R (rewrite) A (add) M (move)

  3. In the intro paragraph, put a star (*) next to the hook.

  4. Put brackets [ ] around the thesis sentence in the introduction.

  • Also, have students pair-share with someone who has finished his/her rough draft. The partner should be looking for any grammatical errors as well as ideas that are confusing or not fully explained.

  • Before students type final drafts, teacher must read and approve for typing.

  • Students will type final drafts on www.paperrater.com (or in Efolio if available) to get a score. If student is unhappy with score or has a failing score, he/she can correct draft and repost.







Georgia Department of Education

Dr. John D. Barge, State School Superintendent

February 2012 * Page

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