Greater klamath river basin community tulelake conference the situation, short and long term vision and strategies


partly through changes in forest structure, returning fire frequency and intensity



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partly through changes in forest structure, returning fire frequency and intensity.





  • Life in the river system is in balance, able to sustain themselves in times of drought and outflow in times of abundance. We live together in harmony and others feel our peace.




  • Endangered species have recovered and natural processes have been restored (hydrology). Anadromous fish return home to waters through the basin. Fish in the cascades are reconnected to waters in the Klamath Lake.



OUR BASIN TWENTY YEARS FROM NOW - A SUMMARY (cont.)


  • Salmon and steelhead will have returned to the upper basin and suckers (C’Wam) will once again be a main element of the Klamath Tribes diet. Salmon and steelhead fishing is serious business above Klamath Lake.




  • Tribal communities maintain their relationships with the sacred life around them. All tribes will have a land base and plentiful resources.




  • From the headwaters of the Sprague to the mouth of the Klamath the watershed has retained its rural character. The basin is a rural place where most people make their livelihood stewarding the ecosystem–land, waters, plants & creatures (including domestic), and doing so sufficiently it supports them and the economies of their communities.




  • Rural communities, cultures, lifestyles and values are sustained through wise use and stewardship of the land and water resources. The rural communities realized that their way of life was most threatened by urban sprawl, the global market, and large corporations, and performed a basin-wide cooperatively produced socio-economic assessment and 50-year sustainable strategy.



  • Adjudication is complete and order is returned to share water and economic needs and agriculture people who have property know the value of riparian habitat and water quality and practice this on private land. Agriculture business continue but use less water so more is added to rivers. Irrigated Agriculture will have sufficient water for growing marketable crops.





  • I would like to see the Basin in 20 years with healthier salmon runs, less dams, and the dams that are still here have fish passage. A new power contract will allow long term rates to allow Agriculture to service in the upper basin.




  • Sustainable Agriculture will be a significant part of the economy in each community. Farmers and ranchers prosper and take enormous pride in their food production and major positive role in restoring fish runs.




  • That elected local government has a significant role in this process. The two states and the Federal government will approach communities in a unified way. Twenty years from now, NMFS is considered an asset, not an agency that polarizes communities. We will create a breed of super-scientists.




  • Land use laws will limit the number of houses that can be developed on agriculture land.

OUR BASIN TWENTY YEARS FROM NOW - A SUMMARY (cont.)



  • I will sit in my rocker and tell my great grandchildren about the changes I have witnessed in my 74 years in the Klamath County Basin. Our children envision their future with the understanding that it is mutually dependent upon the health of the other beings in the Basin and who are at peace and in harmony with all. I hope to see young people willing and able to stay in their community, to have the opportunity for a better future.



  • The Klamath Basin is synonymous with the ideas of collaborative solutions and being one of the best places on earth. We are the prime example, where old processes ended.





  • The people of the Basin created a Klamath Congress and Klamath Stamp to promote sustainable rural communities to provide a model for peoples of the world. We are a symbol of the power of humans to effectively find solutions through collaboration and understanding.


“The Klamath River Basin Community... a small town with really long streets.”

OUR BASIN TWENTY YEARS FROM NOW - OUR COMMON VISION
Each of the group members answered the question below on a 3 x 5 card. These were read off to the larger community group. These statements describe the long term purpose of the endeavor for the participants.
Working together as a Basin community, , with understanding, trust, from the bottom up, what will be the best possible outcomes for Tribal and Non-Tribal communities in 20 years?”
These statements are then used to develop collective statements. These are the best outcomes we want from the situation, a vision of the future we want to create. They consist of statements which are made in the present tense, as if the purpose is already happening. This is an “active” way to express the purpose. Each strategy or action must foster these desired purposes.

-o-

I’m sitting on my horse, snow on the mountains..still ~ watching the fish wiggle past ~ thinking of the sun setting over the waves where this water finally meets the sea. I can see a man on a rock with a net, and he is thinking of me.”


“Goals realized. Vision reached.”

In 20 years the Klamath Basin will be known as a good and peaceful place to live, work, and raise a family for all of its human, fish, and other wildlife inhabitants. There are only healthy communities, including the tribes. The Klamath Basin will be known as a vibrant, productive, attractive place in which to live, offering numerous opportunities to young and old alike.

A United Basin–from the headwaters to the ocean–with sustainable fishery, agriculture and recreational opportunities. We live and work in a watershed that no longer includes names like “the lower river,” or “upper basin” or “project area.” Rather it is known just as the Klamath Community–a small town with really long streets.
We wish for a complete community that provides opportunities for all to enjoy work, enjoy family and life in general. People will respect each other. We can honor each other’s culture. Community. Friends. Stewardship abounds.
Twenty years from now each of us will clearly see that listening to each other with respect was worth the time it took. Facets and factions have pulled together in such a way that we don’t operate on fear, all of us truly know trust and hope and even joy. People of the basin will be continuing to meet civilly to seek resolution of problems that will arise, to monitor and honor recovery of systems, and enjoy clean water, fish, forests, farms and culture as their heritage. Others feel our peace.
Upper and lower basin people will continue to communicate face to face when issues and concerns arise. I hope the conflict and crisis are over. I hope to see an understanding of the Klamath River for what it is and can be, not arguments over what it cannot be.

OUR BASIN TWENTY YEARS FROM NOW - OUR COMMON VISION (cont.)

People in the basin are proud to have come together to resolve the old self centered ways of looking at river issues. We have learned to work together by starting with small successes and building on them. People that have moved on and put past inequities aside. That our differing cultures enrich each other.

Stories are told and passed on to the next generation about how you came to be this community. We have processed our collective history and made peace with past injustices by rewriting our stories to include how actions and times affected all sides. The people of the basin talk about the great friends they have from the mouth to the headwaters. “I enjoy visiting my old friends Troy and Becky at the annual Salmon/Beef Festival.”

We understand the moral imperative to keep all peoples in the Klamath Basin as a whole. To take off from Petey’s song : there is a neighborhood and it is in the watershed. People know they are in this basin wide community by what they see and say and do with each other.
People in the watershed gather annually to celebrate unity. A new annual holiday called “coming together” occurs each year over two weekends ~ one in February in Klamath Falls and one in September in Klamath. One dedicates ourselves to each other and renews our respect at each holiday ~ keeping mutual seasonal goals that support a thriving, prosperous ecosystem with our eye towards future renewal. Visitors come to enjoy the rivers, the forests and the fish and wildlife.
The Klamath Basin will be a fully functioning ecosystem supporting thriving populations of fish and wildlife that are enjoyed and appreciated by all citizens. There are whole communities and vibrant natural resources from the top to the bottom of the watershed. A healthy, functioning ecosystem which includes farming, ranching and other uses of our natural resources. Dip-netting, potatoes, thunder of geese flocks in the skies, salmon ceremonies, spawning fish in the rivers, smiling elected officials, respected agency people, happy children,.
The people of the Klamath Watershed have learned to live sustainably within the watershed boundaries and beyond to the coastal communities that fish for salmon. A model and prototype for stewardship in an entire watershed. The people have found a balance of natural resource, social and financial capital. Continued science, continued stakeholder meetings, proactive versus reactive approach to species protection, government incentives for resource protection, strong local and congressional support. We will create a breed of super-scientists.

A healthy, functioning ecosystem with prospering communities, an example of how powerful and successful grassroots efforts can be. A stable, economically vibrant watershed community with adequate water for all needs and a flourishing, restored ecosystem, including fisheries, that is a model for others to follow. Either reverted to desert sage brush, sand dunes and potholes, or bloom as an oasis. I hope it blooms.


OUR BASIN TWENTY YEARS FROM NOW - OUR COMMON VISION (cont.)

There will be a healthy Agriculture community with clean rivers flowing through benefitting fish and wildlife. Agriculture and wildlife flourish in the Klamath Basin. The farmers will have the most environmentally efficient farms. Clean waters for fish and families down river. Happy, vibrant farmers and landowners and farm families are producing abundant food, and waterfowl cloud the skies. There are places for the wild plants and animals to live and thrive.
The historic hydrologic regime will be restored within each watershed. Watershed function will be resolved. There will have been a program of preserving all riparian areas along lakes, rivers and tributaries from development so that wildlife restoration could take place. The deltas and wetlands will be restored around Klamath Lake.
This will be accomplished through changes in forest structure, returning fire frequency and intensity. Healthy forests and range land where fire/thinning have recreated and improved habitat. Upland forests are thinned and fire can play a more natural role in the pine forests.
Life in the river system is in balance, able to sustain themselves in times of drought and outflow in times of abundance. All life forms, people, furred, finned and feathered ones have what they need to prosper. Abundant bird life is present.
We live together in harmony and others feel our peace. We have healthy agrarian and tribal communities, a vibrant city center at Klamath Falls. Farmers and fishermen help each other. We have natural farms. Vibrant healthy fisherman, tribal communities. Vibrant and healthy watershed. Less greed. People take only what they need. Environmentalists are “friends.”

Endangered species have recovered and natural processes have been restored (hydrology). Healthy spring chinook and other fisheries species runs thrive throughout their historical range. There are no endangered species in the watershed. No listed species...nor proposed and all that will infer. Dams will be removed and managed for fish.

Anadromous fish return home to waters through the basin. Salmon will return to the upper basin. Return of healthy stocks of native fishes. We restore salmon runs. Salmon are everywhere. Chinook, Coho, Redband trout, Sturgeon, C’wam, Eddon populations are harvestable and trending upward. The salmon will be thriving and there will be an abundance of green and white sturgeon.
Fish in the cascades are reconnected to waters in the Klamath Lake. The upper tributaries to the Klamath Lake will be full of healthy fish. Fish runs are healthy and the dams are still working. Long live the fish! For if they are doing well, it likely means we’ve figured out how to create a healthy watershed and if the watershed is healthy then so are we.

OUR BASIN TWENTY YEARS FROM NOW - OUR COMMON VISION (cont.)

Salmon and steelhead will have returned to the upper basin and suckers will once again be a main element of the Klamath Tribes diet. Klamath Indian tribes will have salmon once again and my children and family will make the trips up to see their C’wam ceremony. They will function properly with well managed farms and ranches. The same on the Scott and Shasta.
Salmon and steelhead fishing is serious business above Klamath Lake. Sucker runs are enormous, supporting a large tribal fishery and providing inter generational cultural glue. My son brings me salmon, spring salmon for dinner and he gives it to his old man with a sense of pride. My granddaughter is a salmon fisherwoman if she so chooses.

Tribal communities maintain their relationships with the sacred life around them. And, like the creatures that cycle around the variations in the river life, they to have a foundation that sustains them and their culture through all the ebbs and flows life brings. Tribes and irrigators will agree to drop claims against each other regarding water rights adjudication in the upper basin.

All tribes will have a land base and plentiful resources. Tribal people and non-tribal can again be free on their own land, to caretake it, not the government. There will be tribal land returned. Tribal trust is positively being met.
From the headwaters of the Sprague to the mouth of the Klamath the watershed has retained its rural character. We are a culturally diverse rural community. Rural character remains. We like the rural character. Diversity is valued. Diversity is honored. Peace and harmony reign. Life is good!
Rural communities, cultures, lifestyles and values are sustained through wise use and stewardship of the land and water resources. The basin is a rural place where most people make their livelihood stewarding the ecosystem–land, waters, plants & creatures (including domestic), and doing so sufficiently it supports them and the economies of their communities. The Klamath Basin watershed is healthy. Dams are gone or altered for fish. Anadromous fish return to historic range. Inter-generational cultural opportunities abound. Fur, fun and feathered ones.
All communities (human, animal, plant) are thriving. Agriculture and farm families thrive once again. These resources shape not only the landscape but also the fine people that live here. Chiloquin, Tulelake, Klamath are known as vital, vibrant communities, full of opportunity. Tulelake is a thriving business community with no empty buildings with graffiti, prosperous ranches, onions, clear water, less cancer in farming communities. We don’t know really what labels mean anymore, friends and neighbors are all the river people, the ONRC & KFA are leading tours with the lawyers at the Wildlife Refuge, peace.
OUR BASIN TWENTY YEARS FROM NOW - OUR COMMON VISION (cont.)

The rural communities realized that their way of life was most threatened by urban sprawl, the global market, and large corporations, and performed a basin-wide cooperatively produced socio-economic assessment and 50-year sustainable strategy. This alleviated people’s fears and allowed the communities to create and make choices good for all peoples of the basin. We have a sustainable resource use mixed with a planned diverse economy, promoted traditional practices that emphasized subsistence, barter, and locally driven economies.

Adjudication is complete and order is returned to share water and economic needs and agriculture people who have property know the value of riparian habitat and water quality and practice this on private land. The water that previously stayed in the basin before the project is all that stays in the basin, and what went down the river will go down the river. That way farmers and ranchers and fishermen can thrive, and rivers will have natural flows.
Agriculture business continue but use less water so more is added to rivers. Additional ground water will be developed and used reasonably. Landowners will be very clear about what is expected from them to survive. We have finally increased our storage for water. The lower reaches of the Klamath will benefit from water storage, water savings developments. Upper basin will develop it’s potential of cold clean water storage i.e. Long Lake, Sycan Canyon, Swan Lake and others. Water quality problems from mining is stopped.
Irrigated Agriculture will have sufficient water for growing marketable crops. The farmers and ranchers are still intact, with more efficient water uses for their crops. People know how much water they will have no matter what the year type and the Water Master will be able to regulate by priority dates. Tributaries will provide clean, cold water to lakes and main stem rivers. Clear cool water is used in sustainable ways, with cutting edge desert irrigation and crop development.
I would like to see the Basin in 20 years with healthier salmon runs, less dams, and the dams that are still here have fish passage. All the dams would be removed (at least all the lower dams). There will have been no more dams in my children’s lives. The dams are removed. Some dams are gone, fish ladders are around others.

A new power contract will allow long term rates to allow Agriculture to service in the upper basin. These help allow healthy community and watersheds. The Klamath Basin will own their own utility company which produces affordable power. Dams will be removed.

Sustainable Agriculture will be a significant part of the economy in each community. We shift to more organic farming, fencing and planting of riparian areas, removal of small dams. There is a shift of a consumer base willing to pay more for organics and solar products, catch and release programs. Some downsizing of Agriculture will happen ~ but only under highly respectable means, and only by willing people. If any veterans are down sizing, we will honor their service both to their country and to the farm or ranch.


OUR BASIN TWENTY YEARS FROM NOW - OUR COMMON VISION (cont.)

Farmers and ranchers prosper and take enormous pride in their food production and major positive role in restoring fish runs. Commodity-based agriculture still exists based on natural surpluses. These products demand a premium price and are highly valued throughout the world. Farmers and ranchers in the upper Klamath basin will be marketing salmon safe agricultural products. Agriculture is based on supply.
That elected local government has a significant role in this process. We stakeholders will be the voice, the lawmakers. Inhabitants, families and opportunities feel that they have control over their destinies and have the freedom to pursue their choice of life way. There is control of choice. That this control and choice is exercised with responsibility and compassion, resulting in vibrant and healthy and diverse private endeavors, families, communities, cultures and economies.

The two states and the Federal government will approach communities in a unified way. A watershed without overbearing Federal or state agencies–replaced by local, consensus-based governance and supported by a locally-based economy, not driven by the whims of an unstable corporate global economy (including a locally-owned utility). The way it was 200 years ago, except with a couple of more farmers, no BOR or BIA or BLM or any other acronym that starts with a “B” that takes the power from the people.

Twenty years from now, NMFS is considered an asset, not an agency that polarizes communities. It no longer needs to regulate the Klamath Project, because coho have recovered due to the voluntary efforts of all the stakeholders that rely on the River without sacrificing the values and economic needs of the Klamath communities.
We will create a breed of super-scientists.
Land use laws will limit the number of houses that can be developed on agriculture land. Human populations do not negatively impact the environment, and have high social standards of education, health care and homes. The economics of the watershed are in balance with the social and natural resource capital, not leaving deficits.
I will sit in my rocker and tell my great grandchildren about the changes I have witnessed in my 74 years in the Klamath County Basin. At that time, we will have a vibrant Agriculture and natural resource industry combined with a river basin that is one of the best in the world. I will tell my great grandchildren how proud I was of the people that made this happen. The young teens again are familiar with the traditions of their own and of their distant friends. Our children look back and can’t understand why we were so divided. I am enjoying retirement. In 20 years I hope I can still make my own martinis.
OUR BASIN TWENTY YEARS FROM NOW - OUR COMMON VISION (cont.)
Our children envision their future with the understanding that it is mutually dependent upon the health of the other beings in the Basin and who are at peace and in harmony with all. The children of today grow to be adults with a sense of place and community that includes the whole watershed and would never even consider making decisions that negatively impacted their neighbors within the Klamath Watershed.

I hope to see young people willing and able to stay in their community, to have the opportunity for a better future. A Klamath Watershed where all children learn from the same place-based curriculum that is based on the history, land uses, communities and values of their greater watershed. 20 years later, I continue to call it my home and office. My kids will be able to do all of the things that are their birthright, i.e. gather basket materials, gill-net salmon, etc.
The Klamath Basin is synonymous with the ideas of collaborative solutions and being one of the best places on earth. We have a better understanding of each other’s livelihoods and respect for one another. When issues arise, the entire watershed works as neighbors to resolve them equitably. They have learned to support and speak for each other. We will take care of each other through difficult transitions. My dad once told me, “Friends and enemies change, though self-interest never does.” I see all the people of the Klamath understanding that they are all one community, where each person helps foster a durable livelihood for one another.

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