Greater klamath river basin community tulelake conference the situation, short and long term vision and strategies


Clean up our own issues first and go forward to reach other communities



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Clean up our own issues first and go forward to reach other communities.


  • Doing the hard work of moving the stakeholders of our own group forward. Lets clean up our own back yards first.

  • Let’s settle our own adjudication and other issues so that we go forward as a whole community, united, then unite with the other communities to do the work that is necessary.

  • Go back to your groups and get them to work out the problems. Then come back to the bigger group.

  • If we are going to call for a cease fire, then reach out to other communities.


A basin wide newsletter.

  • A dedicated publication instead of columns of op-ed in other publications.

  • A publication (newsletter). A newsletter.

  • Swapping space in our newsletters.

  • Publication (periodical and book length).

  • Printed material for those especially older people that don’t use computers, to get the information.


A Website, independent, interactive. A Website. Website is a good idea. Web sites.

  • A common website: like at OIT. A website through CIP.

  • A central information link. Website ; combine information links, .

  • Finish and develop a web chat room with Chadwick rules. Website/chat room for Chadwick. KBFF.

  • A virtual tour of watershed on the internet.

THE NEXT STEPS, STRATEGIES AND ACTIONS (cont.)

Group communication; use a central website and share contact information and share what is happening to us with each other.

  • A central database system is needed.
  • An Information clearing house to include peer reviews and white papers on key issues. An information directory.


  • The BOR website; FSF.org gives an all Federal money list.

  • Communications: website; for technical information, organizational information, projects, resources, listing of successes.

  • Central location web site for basin wide real time data (e.g. water flows, fish runs, irrigation water usage.)

  • Web information: identify all groups, their mission, contacts, abstracts, i.e. COMMUNICATION!!! It is difficult to understand mission and purpose of all the water and natural resources groups.

  • Website: technical, organization information, projects.

  • Technical abstracts.

  • Organization information.

  • Projects: what has been done, being done, remains to be done, successes, failures, recommendations.


Develop a common language or understanding so that upriver and downriver communities know what is happening, place names, definitions.
Create a science group for the Basin. Create a Basin Science team. Team science. Team Science.

  • A policy working group (ESA).

  • Expand the science team make-up.

  • Team science versus bad science.

  • 3 faculty at Klamath Experiment station to synthesis and transfer the Basin fisheries and water science into lay language.

  • Also the agricultural uses of the scientist.

  • Metole restoration study Libby’s.


Agencies can look at the biological opinions to see how their terms and conditions can be interpreted to better protect the 2 species and avoid community chaos in this drought year.

  • Reconsider rules and tolerances on regulations. Agency flexibility.
  • What is the tolerance level of the Biological Opinions?


  • Is there an undefined level of tolerance?

  • Tolerance, “wiggle room” by regulatory agencies.


THE NEXT STEPS, STRATEGIES AND ACTIONS (cont.)

Common objectives for restoration are shared between the Federal agencies; ERO, FS, NRCS.

  • Look at reconciling the 2 biological opinions for the long term.

  • Deciding in advance on immediate and short term actions that can be taken to protect the most im-perished species.

  • Un-depleted flow study. Un-depleted natural flow. What to do with it.

  • A recovery plan for the suckers (C’wam).

  • Agency coordination, and community training.


Getting agencies together, both for funding and ease of implementation.

  • Understand how processes can work together to leverage funds.

  • Combine pools of money.

  • Partnerships, leveraging money.


BPA CIP: CIP must be organized with local action being locally based watershed groups.

  • Chadwick workshops will be part of the CIP.

  • Appoint a subcommittee to develop a proposal to link CIP with chadwick circles.

  • Chiloquin Chadwick group: CIP funded!!


Integrate groups: community and to basin groups especially. A super agency that is somehow grassroots driven by diverse stakeholders.

  • Become a collective, a co-ordinated Basin wide group. Co-ordinate groups working in the basin.

  • Consolidate “action groups” to make a more consolidated effort. Merging of different advisory groups. Consolidate meeting groups. Consolidate groups?

  • If we bring all groups together, “ONE STOP SHOPPING,” headwaters to the mouth.
  • Integrate the various restoration groups and other groups. Integrate the multi groups in one room.



Transform the Upper Basin Working Group to the Klamath Basin Working group involving all the stakeholders, including environmental.

  • See the group grow to include even more interested parties.

  • Support additions to the working group. Extend an olive branch between groups.

  • More involvement by environmental groups, such as ONRC and groups. Environmental contact.

  • Try, try again to get more environmental groups in the neighborhood.

  • Integrate a wide array of interest groups. Integrate groups.


Hold a Klamath Basin Congress, Basin wide. A Klamath Congress Now!!!

  • A Klamath River Working Group, a Klamath Congress. Klamath Basin Congress.

  • Stakeholders led and not agencies.

THE NEXT STEPS, STRATEGIES AND ACTIONS (cont.)

Hold a State of the Union meeting for the basin. A “Status of the Basin” workshop/conference (as education).

  • Broaden the Klamath Basin ritual meeting to include an information seminar on the “state of the basin.”

  • Restoration activities.

  • Agriculture needs, practices and conservation contributions.

  • Agency studies and activities.

  • Status of listed and other species.

  • Watershed group reports and accomplishments. List accomplishments.

  • Tribal needs and activities.


Have a community ceremony and a means to come together annually.

  • Establish the whole Basin community with a celebration.

  • Commit to holding a meeting in early April for setting short tem strategies and a gathering in October as a community festival.
  • Schedule 2 annual whole basin ceremonies.


  • A basin wide fall festival. Create a fall festival to share our mutual bounty. Basin wide Ritual event: October?

  • A Klamath River Basin Celebration. An annual “eating” festival.


Join in the ritual events, share in the values, beliefs and heart of the people, eating together. This has been shown to reduce anxiety.

  • Provide invitations to rituals.

  • Attend cultural events. Participate in ceremonies.

  • Going to tribal gatherings. Importance of tribal visits. Go to tribal ceremonies.


Design social interactions to begin strengthening our sense of a total basin community.

  • Folks from entire basin building habitat for humanity house.

  • Community clean-ups of the river and spending time with other members to get a better feel for what they do and who they are.


More Chadwick Meetings throughout the watershed.

  • Use “Chadwick-type” meetings focused on key relationships.

  • Hold “Communication’ meetings. “Meeting and eating.” The meet and eat idea.

  • Monthly meetings of stakeholders to keep communication lines open.

  • Town hall meetings to keep our communities informed.

  • All basin sharing individual communities.



THE NEXT STEPS, STRATEGIES AND ACTIONS (cont.)

Delay the FERC dam re-license process until a consensus is developed.

  • Delay the FERC license until we get it together.

  • Hold off on FERC re-licensing. Re-licensing halt. FERC re-licensing and unifying all groups, consolidating and communicating.

  • A shorter term FERC re-licensing?

  • Look at power generation with subcommittees. Power issues: wind solar. Power.



An Elder’s advice; “Let there be no lip service here... speak from the heart.”


APPENDIX

* A RELATIONSHIP CONFRONTATION/RESOLUTION PROCESS
(NOTE: This is the process used to develop the “Situation.”)
The participants have explored the nature of their relationships, and developed the beliefs and behaviors that would foster their desired outcomes. In doing so, they have experienced listening with respect, creating a new and shared knowledge base. They have experienced being trusting, open and honest.
The participants are now asked to experience confronting the conflicts that are unresolved in their relationships. They experience a process for resolving relationship conflicts by actually confronting the conflicts between them.
This is the process that was demonstrated and experienced:
STEP 1: The individuals in conflict are asked if they would be willing to confront their issue with the larger group. The process was first explained to them. At this point, the participants readily agree to the experience.
STEP 2. The conflict persons select 1-2 individuals to listen for them. These people play the role of allowing the persons in conflict to be natural and reactive when speaking to the other about the conflict. They hear the left brain material that is hidden in the right brain and reactive tones of voice.
STEP 3. The first person having the issue with the other begins by expressing the nature of the relationship conflict as she sees it, and describes how she feels about it.
STEP 4. The listener for the other person repeats what she heard the first person say.

STEP 5. The other person responds by providing his reaction to the situation as expressed by the first person, providing his view of the situation, and how it makes him feel.

STEP 6. The listener for the first person expresses what he heard the other say.
STEP 7. There are a number of options here, some, or all, of which can apply:
* A RELATIONSHIP CONFRONTATION/RESOLUTION PROCESS (Cont.)
o The first person reacts and responds to what was said. The listener again repeats what she heard to the other. The other person responds and reacts to the new information. This is repeated by the other listener. This allows each person to clarify information, to get other feelings out, to maybe even be more confrontive now that it feels safe.
o The listeners are asked to state what they feel are the key issues between the parties. This provides pro-active information to the protagonists, and helps them process the conflict.
o Other members of the group are asked to state what they heard, how they feel about it, and what some resolution of the problem would be.
o If others were mentioned by either of the two protagonists, they are given an opportunity to provide their view of the situation and how they feel about it.
STEP 8. The first person is asked to express the needs of the other that she heard need to be met. This is an expression of the other's best outcomes in the relationship. She then expresses the needs she has that the other person can meet to help the relationship.
STEP 9. The other person states the needs he heard the first person has, and states what his needs are. He then states what he is willing to do to meet the needs.
STEP 10. The first person repeats the needs she hears the other has, and states her willingness to meet those needs.

STEP 11. (OPTIONAL) Each person describes the relationship they will have with the other in a set period of time. This description may be recorded. This provides a best outcome or mission of the parties.

STEP 12. Each person who participated states how they feel about the confrontation and resolution, and what they learned from the experience. Each of the listeners speaks first, then the parties in the conflict close the discussion.
* A RELATIONSHIP CONFRONTATION/RESOLUTION PROCESS (Cont.)

o How do you feel about this experience?

o What did you learn that will make the group successful?
STEP 13. The parties are honored by having them go to the center of the room. This allows them to make some physical gesture of resolution.
The facilitator manages this process. It is important that the individuals agree to the process in the beginning. Once the individuals start to speak, they are allowed to continue without interruption. It is not unusual for the other person to want to immediately set the record straight as the first person talks. The facilitator must encourage this person to listen until the first person is done.
Sometimes another member of the group wants to interrupt and set the record straight. Again, the facilitator must ask the person to wait until the protagonists themselves have spoken before letting others be involved. Each person is allowed to speak, but in turn, when the individuals in conflict have had their say.
Sometimes one of the parties wants to go back over old ground. It is best to move the parties on, cautioning against the natural desire to remain in the conflict. The individual may be allowed to add information, even if repetitive, provided the solution is given at the end of the statement. It is the responsibility of the facilitator to encourage the participants to move ahead, while still being respectful of the need to confront.

* COLLECTIVE STATEMENTS

Collective statements are based on the belief that each of us sees the world from a different viewpoint. Our individual views are like pieces of a puzzle -- when we fit them all together we get the full picture.

In most meetings our views tend to be seen as competitive. When someone speaks, another person responds with a counter-statement, and the meeting progresses with each trying to convince the other of his or her rightness. This behavior is based on a belief in the "one right answer" to all questions. Only one of us can be right, so our intelligence is used to establish that rightness firmly. It becomes a competition in which each person's ego and intelligence are at stake.
This is either/or thinking -- either you are right or I am! Often, two or three people will capture all the time in a meeting with this either/or conflict, while others listen, get bored, and drop out. It is a time-consuming, ineffective process. The meeting ends with some vaguely worded compromise that relieves the participants. They leave with little commitment to it.
Collective thinking assumes we can all learn something from each other. We have different views of a situation, and all views are right.
This is done with many of the workshop tasks. The collective statements are the result of adding individual statements together, keeping each person's words to the best extent possible, creating a statement of the total group.

* DEVELOPING A COLLECTIVE STATEMENT

A collective statement process is based on the notion that we all have different views of a situation, and all views are right. Each of us perceives the world through our experiences, our values and beliefs and our desires.


In some tasks, statements made by each individual participant are recorded as accurately as possible. These statements are first segregated into common groups. The individual statements are then added together, keeping each person's words to the best extent possible, creating a statement of the total group.

At times it is necessary to add words to the brief recorded statements to clarify the intent. Or, a word might be added to bridge two or more statements together. This is kept to a minimum in order to retain the original recorded thought.

While some grammatical improvements may be made, the original statement and the original words are kept as close as possible.
As an example, these were the original recorded statements of the "Senior Citizens Worst Outcomes of the Situation":
SENIOR CITIZENS WORST OUTCOMES OF THE SITUATION:
1. Unsafe community to live in

2. Will regress, if no progress

3. Things fine, no higher taxes

4. Our senior programs will be cut--lack of funds

5. My needs as senior will not be considered and taxes rise--skyrocket

6. More leave town, higher crime, higher taxes, less facilities

7. Leads to collapse of government

8. If not forward, then backwards.

9. Become retirement community, kids leave, no industry,

10. Uncertain, unhappy future



DEVELOPING A COLLECTIVE STATEMENT (CONT.)

The statements are segregated to become like groups of statements:


SENIOR CITIZENS WORST OUTCOMES OF THE SITUATION:
2. Will regress, if no progress

8. If not forward, then backwards.


3. Things fine, no higher taxes

9. Become retirement community, kids leave, no industry


5. My needs as senior will not be considered and taxes rise--skyrocket

4. Our senior programs will be cut--lack of funds


1. Unsafe community to live in.

6. More leave town, higher crime, higher taxes, less facilities

7. Leads to collapse of government

10. Uncertain, unhappy future


These statements are now linked together to form the final collective statement. Words that are added in the process are shown in parentheses:


THE SENIOR CITIZENS WORST OUTCOMES:
(The community) will regress, if (there is) no progress. If (we do) not (move) forward, then (we slide) backwards.

(We all think that) things (are) fine, (as long as there are) no higher taxes. (We) become (a) retirement community, (the) kids leave, (there is) no industry.

My needs as (a) senior will not be considered and taxes will rise, skyrocketing. Our senior programs will be cut (because) of (a) lack of funds.
(This will be an) unsafe community to live in. (More business and people) leave town, (because of) higher crime, higher taxes, less facilities. (This) leads to a collapse of government. (We face) an uncertain, unhappy future.

DEVELOPING A COLLECTIVE STATEMENT (CONT.)
This is another example of the process. Begin with the original recorded statements:
PARENTS WORST OUTCOMES OF THE SITUATION:
1. Extremely large classrooms (40/50 room)

2. Children won't have educational background to get into college

3. If parenting skills not improved, what will it do to child's education?

4. If we can't solve drug problem, what is future of our children?

5. The children will never leave home.

6. My kids will waste their talents and be average like everybody else.

7. Dropping out!

8. The children won't be happy and won't be prepared for the next step after high school

9. Parents lack of concern will hinder ability of the child

10. Drugs and gangs will come into community

11. The lack of the best education and know-how to deal with life on their own.
Segregate them into the like statements:
PARENTS WORST OUTCOMES OF THE SITUATION:
11. The lack of the best education and know-how to deal with life on their own.

8. The children won't be happy and won't be prepared for the next step after high school

2. Children won't have educational background to get into college

6. My kids will waste their talents and be average like everybody else.

1. Extremely large classrooms (40/50 room)

7. Dropping out!

5. The children will never leave home.

9. Parents lack of concern will hinder ability of the child

3. If parenting skills not improved, what will it do to child's education?


10. Drugs and gangs will come into community

4. If we can't solve drug problem, what is future of our children?



PARENTS WORST OUTCOMES OF THE SITUATION:
Then put the statements together, adding words where absolutely necessary, keeping the original intent as much as possible.
THE PARENTS WORST OUTCOMES:
(The children will have a) lack of the best education and (the) know-how to deal with life on their own. (They) won't be happy and won't be prepared for the next step after high school. (Our) children won't have educational background to get into college. (Our) kids will waste their talents and be average like everybody else.
(We will have) extremely large classrooms (40/50 room). (The students are) dropping out (of school)! The children will never leave home!
(The) parents lack of concern will hinder ability of the child. If parenting skills (are) not improved, what will it do to the child's education?
Drugs and gangs will come into community. If we can't solve the drug problem, what is (the) future of our children?
* THE COMMUNITY IS TELLING A STORY
For years I sought for a way to help people understand at an integrative, or organic level, the value of the collective statements, and all of the activities that lead up to it. It was the story telling approach of an Indian elder that helped me to see how to do this.
Everyone Is Telling a Story: I ask 6 to 8 people who are seated together in the circle to stand and move one step into the circle. I walk out into the center of the circle and act as the director of this story.

I have learned, over time, that every conflict has a community of interest, that it brings together those who are influenced or impacted by the decision. I am asking these people to represent a community of interest.

Another thing I learned is that each community that is brought together around a conflict has a community story to tell, but the individual members do not understand that. They each come to the gathering believing that they have the entire story in themselves, and they are there to convince the others of the “truth” of what they know.
To demonstrate this, I am going to ask this group to tell a story. They are going to do this like we did when we were in kindergarten, and the teacher asked us to each tell a part of the story. We begin with Rob, who will repeat the first sentence that I give him. This is the beginning of the story. Then, Kathy will add her sentence to the story, followed by Laura adding a sentence, and so on, until Crista, the last person in the line, will create an ending for the story.
I state for Rob the first sentence for the story: “A porcupine walked into the meadow.”
Rob: A porcupine walked into the meadow.”
Kathy: (Thinking first) It was a warm and sunny day.”
Laura: “He saw another animal in the meadow.”
Jon: “It was a bear, an angry bear just waking up from a winter nap.”
Debbie: The bear growled at the porcupine when he approached.”
Dawn: “This frightened the porcupine, so he climbed a tree to get away from the bear.
Crista: There he met a female porcupine who became his mate for life.”
With the ending of this story the large group will normally laugh and applaud. The members of the story group are often nervous and self conscious about speaking and really think, trying to come up with the “right” sentence that makes sense.
I repeat the learning I have had about communities of interest.

I have learned that every conflict has a community of interest, and that community which is drawn together has a community story to tell. But, they don’t know that. They each think they have the full story.”

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