Group Resume Activity Materials: Chart paper Masking tape Description

:)


Download 309.8 Kb.
Page1/3
Date conversion21.10.2017
Size309.8 Kb.
  1   2   3
Group Resume Activity


Materials:


  1. Chart paper

  2. Masking tape


Description:

This activity will help students learn about each other and learn what should be included in a resume. As students progress across the grade levels, they should develop increasingly sophisticated work-related texts, which include, for example, memos, emails, correspondence, project plans, work orders, proposals, resumes, bios, abstracts, Web pages.



Step-by Step:

1. Write an individual resume including



  • Name Work Experience

  • Education/Professional Development

  • Skills/Expertise

  • Hobbies/Talents

2. Take chart paper and write a group resume.

3. Introduce your group using the group resume.



Pedestrian Unit
Materials

  • Technology Survey (2 per person)

  • “The Pedestrian” story

  • Sentence Puzzles (1 set of pieces for each group of 4-5)

  • “All Watched Over By Machines of Loving Grace” poem

  • Informational Text

  • Copy paper

  • Markers

  • Highlighters

  • Bag of research topics (1 set for each group of 4-5)


Description

This unit is based around a central text, the short story “The Pedestrian” by Ray Bradbury. The unit is designed to demonstrate how to incorporate multiple CLEs, Checks for Understandings, and SPIs.


Step-by-Step

  1. Write a group resume.
  2. Give each participant a Technology Survey and have everyone take the survey based on his/her own personal feelings about technology. Discuss the findings. Explain that in the text we are about to read, the author conveys his feelings about technology through setting, word choice, the mood and tone of the piece.


  3. Have participants begin reading “The Pedestrian.” It is a short piece that can easily be read in a few minutes. Chunk the text, but cover the reading however you choose (partner reading, silent reading…). Have participants read the first 6 paragraphs (Stop after “moon radiance”) Ask participants to discuss the setting. What mental picture do they get from the description? Highlight the sentences (channel listings with cowboys, calvary…assorted murders, quizzes, revues…) that provide clues to the historical context of this story. Discuss. (Written in 1953 when TV was the new technology and popular shows were westerns, game shows, etc. Bradbury did not have a TV & liked to walk at night but was stopped by police and questioned because he looked suspicious walking the neighborhood because everyone else was inside watching TV.) Show the slides that have pictures. The porch picture is what life was like before TV, and the other 2 are what life was like after. Then read the rest of the story as the second chunk. Look for clues about how the author feels about technology.

  4. After reading discuss author’s attitude towards technology as revealed in the story (discuss how setting reveals mood/tone)

  5. Have each group (4-5) retake the technology survey but complete it as they believe Bradbury would respond to the questions. Discuss.

  6. Read poem, “All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace” and discuss difference in tone/mood between story and poem.

  7. Handout sentence puzzles. 1 package for each group of 4-5. Each package should contain 3 bags of words. The bag of blue words are verbs; the white or salmon words are nouns, and the green words are other parts of speech. Have groups create sentences for each pattern listed in CLE.
  8. Pass out the informational text. Make sure each group has copy paper and markers. Based on your numbers, divide reading between groups and have each group create a graphic (pie charts, bar graphs…) on copy paper to support its portion of the reading. Each bullet could be given to a small group to create graphics or categories could be grouped and assigned. Display the graphics and discuss.


  9. Give each group a bag of research topics. There are five cards per envelope/bag. Have the group arrange the cards into a continuum from too broad for manageable research to too narrow for an academic research paper. Discuss and have each group hold up the best choice for a research topic.

  10. Discuss extensions.

    • Write research paper on one of the topics from step 8.

    • Research Ray Bradbury and his view of technology in other works.

    • Create different work-related texts centered around a piece of technology like a new copy machine for the office. One group could write a memo to tell the office that a new copier has been installed. One group could draft a contract for maintenance service with the copy machine provider. One could write an instruction sheet for use of the copier, etc


Pedestrian Unit
Course Level Expectations

CLE 3001.1.3, 3002.1.3, 3003.1.3, 3005.1.3 Understand and use correctly a variety of sentence structures.

CLE 3002.2.7, 3002.2.7, 3003.2.7, 3005.2.7 Participate in work teams and group discussions.

CLE 3001.4.1, 3002.4.1, 3003.4.1, 3005.4.1 Define and narrow a problem or research topic.

CLE 3001.6.3, 3002.6.3, 3003.6.3, 3005.6.3 Read, interpret, and analyze graphics that support informational text.

CLE 3001.8.4, 3002.8.4, 3003.8.4 Analyze works of literature for what they suggest about the historical period in which they were written.

CLE 3001.8.5, 3002.8.5 Know and use appropriate literary terms to derive meaning and comprehension from various literary genres.

Checks for Understanding

3001.3.2, 3002.3.2, 3003.3.2, 3005.3.2 Create increasingly complex work-related texts…


State Performance Indicators

SPI 3001.1.2, 3002.1.2, 3003.1.3 Identify the patterns of a given set of sentences…

SPI 3001.2.7, 3002.2.7, 3003.2.6 Select the most appropriate strategies for participating productively in a team.

SPI 3001.3.13, 3002.3.14, 3003.3.14 Select the proper format to convey a set of work-related information.

SPI 3001.6.3, 3002.6.3, 3003.6.2 Determine the appropriateness of a graphic used to support an informational or technical passage.

SPI 3001.4.1, 3002.4.1, 3003.4.1 Select the research topic with the highest degree of focus.

SPI 3001.8.7, 3002.8.6, Differentiate between mood and tone in poetry and prose.

SPI 3001.8.8, 3002.8.7, 3003.8.7 Determine the impact of setting on literary elements

SPI 3001.8.13, 3002.8.12, 3003.8.12 Locate words or phrases that provide historical or cultural clues.

SPI 3003.8.13 Analyze texts to identify the author’s life experiences, attitudes, viewpoints, and beliefs and how these relate to the larger historical, social, and cultural context of his/her work.



Materials needed:

  • Technology survey (2 copies for each participant)

  • Copy of story “The Pedestrian”

  • Copy of poem “All Watched Over By Machines of Loving Grace”

  • Sentence pattern puzzles (1 puzzle for each group of 4-5 participants)

  • Copy of Informational Text
  • Sheet of copy paper and markers for each group


  • Highlighter for each participant

  • Bag of research topics for each group



Assessment Activity Title: “The Pedestrian”


Description of Activity:

  1. Have each participant take the Technology Survey.

  2. Begin reading “The Pedestrian.” Can chunk the text, do partner reading…

  3. As read think about the author’s feelings about technology.

  4. After reading discuss author’s attitude towards technology as revealed in the story (discuss setting, mood/tone)

  5. Have each group (4-5) retake the technology survey but complete it as they believe Bradbury would respond to the questions. Discuss.

  6. Revisit text and highlight the clues to the historical time period. Discuss clues and relate to author’s life and attitude.

  7. Read poem and discuss difference in tone/mood.

  8. Handout sentence puzzles. 1 package for each group of 4-5. Have groups create sentences for each pattern listed in CLE.

  9. Assign informational text. Divide reading between groups and have each group create a graphic to support its portion of the reading. Display and discuss.

  10. Do group resume lesson.

  11. Give bag of research topics to each group. Have them arrange from too broad to narrow focus.

Assignment Extensions:

Write research paper on one of the topics from step 11.

Research Ray Bradbury and his view of technology in other works.

Create different work-related texts centered around a piece of technology.






Technology Survey

Directions: Read each of the following statements and rate your opinion using the following scale: 1 Strongly disagree, 2 Disagree, 3 Agree, 4 Strongly agree









1. Technological advances make life better for everyone.


2. It’s important for adults to find out where their children are going online and who they are talking.


3. Computer technology makes finding information faster and easier.


4. If people let machines do too much for them, eventually people will no longer be able to do things for themselves.


5. Children should be given more freedom in deciding what they do online.


6. It is dangerous to place too much faith in technology.


7. It is impossible to become addicted to the Internet.


8. Children who play computer games often believe that the violent games they play portray life as it actually is.


9. Most teenagers are online too much.


10. Those who worry about the negative effects of technology should think about the modern conveniences available today.


11. Adults too often use the computer games as a kind of babysitter for their children.


12. Having the latest technology is important to success.


“The Pedestrian”
By Ray Bradbury

To enter out into that silence that was the city at eight o'clock of a misty evening in November, to put your feet upon that buckling concrete walk, to step over grassy seams and make your way, hands in pockets, through the silences, that was what Mr. Leonard Mead most dearly loved to do. He would stand upon the corner of an intersection and peer down long moonlit avenues of sidewalk in four directions, deciding which way to go, but it really made no difference; he was alone in this world of 2053 A.D., or as good as alone, and with a final decision made, a path selected, he would stride off, sending patterns of frosty air before him like the smoke of a cigar.


Sometimes he would walk for hours and miles and return only at midnight to his house. And on his way he would see the cottages and homes with their dark windows, and it was not unequal to walking through a graveyard where only the faintest glimmers of firefly light appeared in flickers behind the windows. Sudden gray phantoms seemed to manifest upon inner room walls where a curtain was still undrawn against the night, or there were whisperings and murmurs where a window in a tomb-like building was still open.

Mr. Leonard Mead would pause, cock his head, listen, look, and march on, his feet making no noise on the lumpy walk. For long ago he had wisely changed to sneakers when strolling at night, because the dogs in intermittent squads would parallel his journey with barkings if he wore hard heels, and lights might click on and faces appear and an entire street be startled by the passing of a lone figure, himself, in the early November evening.

On this particular evening he began his journey in a westerly direction, toward the hidden sea. There was a good crystal frost in the air; it cut the nose and made the lungs blaze like a Christmas tree inside; you could feel the cold light going on and off, all the branches filled with invisible snow. He listened to the faint push of his soft shoes through autumn leaves with satisfaction, and whistled a cold quiet whistle between his teeth, occasionally picking up a leaf as he passed, examining its skeletal pattern in the infrequent lamplights as he went on, smelling its rusty smell.
“Hello, in there,” he whispered to every house on every side as he moved. “What's up tonight on Channel 4, Channel 7, Channel 9? Where are the cowboys rushing, and do I see the United States Cavalry over the next hill to the rescue?”
The street was silent and long and empty, with only his shadow moving like the shadow of a hawk in mid-country. If he closed his eyes and stood very still, frozen, he could imagine himself upon the center of a plain, a wintry, windless Arizona desert with no house in a thousand miles, and only dry river beds, the street, for company.
“What is it now?” he asked the houses, noticing his wrist watch. “Eight-thirty P.M.? Time for a dozen assorted murders? A quiz? A revue? A comedian falling off the stage?”
Was that a murmur of laughter from within a moon-white house? He hesitated, but went on when nothing more happened. He stumbled over a particularly uneven section of sidewalk. The cement was vanishing under flowers and grass. In ten years of walking by night or day, for thousands of miles, he had never met another person walking, not one in all that time.

He came to a cloverleaf intersection which stood silent where two main highways crossed the town. During the day it was a thunderous surge of cars, the gas stations open, a great insect rustling and a ceaseless jockeying for position as the scarab-beetles, a faint incense puttering from their exhausts, skimmed homeward to the far directions. But now these highways, too, were like streams in a dry season, all stone and bed and moon radiance.

He turned back on a side street, circling around toward his home. He was within a block of his destination when the lone car turned a corner quite suddenly and flashed a fierce white cone of light upon him. He stood entranced, not unlike a night moth, stunned by the illumination, and then drawn toward it.
A metallic voice called to him: “Stand still. Stay where you are! Don't move!”

He halted.


“Put up your hands!”
“But…”he said.
“Your hands up! Or we'll shoot!”
The police, of course, but what a rare, incredible thing; in a city of three million, there was only one police car left, wasn't that correct? Ever since a year ago, 2052, the election year, the force had been cut down from three cars to one. Crime was ebbing; there was no need now for the police, save for this one lone car wandering and wandering the empty streets.
“Your name?” said the police car in a metallic whisper. He couldn't see the men in it for the bright light in his eyes.
“Leonard Mead,” he said.
“Speak up!”
“Leonard Mead!”
“Business or profession?”
“I guess you'd call me a writer.”
No profession,' said the police car, as if talking to itself. The light held him fixed, like a museum specimen, needle thrust through chest.
“You might say that,” said Mr. Mead.
He hadn't written in years. Magazines and books didn't sell anymore. Everything went on in the tomb-like houses at night now, he thought, continuing his fancy. The tombs, ill-lit by television light, where the people sat like the dead, the gray or multi-colored lights touching their faces, but never really touching them.
“No profession,” said the phonograph voice, hissing. “What are you doing out?”
“Walking,” said Leonard Mead.
“Walking!”
“Just walking,” he said simply, but his face felt cold.
“Walking, just walking, walking?”
“Yes, sir.”

“Walking where? For what?”

“Walking for air. Walking to see.”
“Your address!”
“Eleven South Saint James Street.”
“And there is air in your house, you have an air conditioner, Mr Mead?”
“Yes.”
“And you have a viewing screen in your house to see with?”
“No.”
“No?” There was a crackling quiet that in itself was an accusation.
“Are you married, Mr. Mead?”
“No.”
“Not married,” said the police voice behind the fiery beam. The moon was high and dear among the stars and the houses were gray and silent.
“Nobody wanted me,” said Leonard Mead with a smile.
“Don't speak unless you're spoken to!”
Leonard Mead waited in the cold night.
“Just walking; Mr. Mead?”
“Yes.”
“But you haven't explained for what purpose.”
“I explained; for air, and to see, and just to walk.”
“Have you done this often?”
“Every night for years.”
The police car sat in the center of the street with its radio throat faintly humming.
“Well, Mr. Mead”, it said.
“Is that all?” he asked politely.
“Yes,” said the voice. “Here.” There was a sigh, a pop. The back door of the police car sprang wide. “Get in.”
“Wait a minute, 1 haven't done anything!”
“Get in.”
“I protest!”
“Mr. Mead.”
He walked like a man suddenly drunk. As he passed the front window of the car he looked in. As he had expected, there was no one in the front seat, no one in the car at all.
“Get in.”
He put his hand to the door and peered into the back seat, which was a little cell, a little black jail with bars. It smelled of riveted steel. It smelled of harsh antiseptic; it smelled too clean and hard and metallic. There was nothing soft there.
“Now if you had a wife to give you an alibi,” said the iron voice. “But….”
“Where are you taking me?”

The car hesitated, or rather gave a faint whirring click, as if information, somewhere, was dropping card by punch- slotted card under electric eyes. “To the Psychiatric Center for Research on Regressive Tendencies.”

He got in. The door shut with a soft thud. The police car rolled through the night avenues, flashing its dim lights ahead.
They passed one house on one street a moment later, one house in an entire city of houses that were dark, but this one particular house had all of its electric lights brightly lit, every window a loud yellow illumination, square and warm in the cool darkness.
“That's my house,” said Leonard Mead.
No one answered him.
The car moved down the empty riverbed streets and off away, leaving the empty streets with the empty sidewalks, and no sound and no motion all the rest of the chill November night.

Technology Survey
Directions: Based on tone of “The Pedestrian”, rate Ray Bradbury’s opinion using the following scale: 1 Strongly disagree, 2 Disagree, 3 Agree, 4 Strongly agree








1. Technological advances make life better for everyone.


2. It’s important for adults to find out where their children are going online and who they are talking.


3. Computer technology makes finding information faster and easier.


4. If people let machines do too much for them, eventually people will no longer be able to do things for themselves.


5. Children should be given more freedom in deciding what they do online.


6. It is dangerous to place too much faith in technology.

7. It is impossible to become addicted to the Internet.


8. Children who play computer games often believe that the violent games they play portray life as it actually is.


9. Most teenagers are online too much.


10. Those who worry about the negative effects of technology should think about the modern conveniences available today.


11. Adults too often use the computer games as a kind of babysitter for their children.


12. Having the latest technology is important to success.

All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace

By Richard Brautigan

I like to think (and

the sooner the better!)

of a cybernetic meadow

where mammals and computers

live together in mutually

programming harmony

like pure water

touching clear sky.
I like to think

(right now, please!)

of a cybernetic forest

filled with pines and electronics

where deer stroll peacefully

past computers

as if they were flowers

with spinning blossoms.


I like to think

(it has to be!)

of a cybernetic ecology

where we are free of our labors

and joined back to nature,

returned to our mammal

brothers and sisters,

and all watched over

by machines of loving grace.


Survey Shows Widespread Enthusiasm for High Technology

Americans Love Their Computers and the Internet; 'Digital Divide' Still Exists, but There Is Good News, Too


Read the results from the ADULTS and CHILDRENS survey. Join the discussion.

Americans love the technological revolution. A new poll by National Public Radio, the Kaiser Family Foundation, and Harvard's Kennedy School of Government shows that people overwhelmingly think that computers and the Internet have made Americans' lives better. Although people recognize some dangers in what they see (and would like the government to protect them from these dangers), they are not particularly bothered by potential perils like information overload or phones, faxes and e-mails that never stop. They are buying computers at a fast pace, they are hooking up to the Internet from home, and, for the most part, they like what they see. A separate survey of children age 10-17 shows that they are even more positive than adults, and nearly all of them have access to modern technology at school.

Enthusiasm for computers and the Internet runs wide and deep, across all incomes, all regions of the country, all races, all political ideologies, and most age groups. Of course, there are people who find themselves on the other side of the "digital divide" - especially those with lower incomes, less education, and over the age of 60. For instance, only about half of employed Americans under age 60 with incomes less than $30,000 per year use a computer at work, compared with four out of five of those with higher incomes; and lower-income Americans are less than half as likely as those with higher incomes to have an Internet connection at home. Nevertheless, a surprisingly high proportion of poorer families now have computers, and many lower-income people do have access to the Internet from home. Only older Americans, as a group, seem out of the loop.

Key findings include:


The Love Affair

Americans over 60 are only half as likely to have ever used a computer as younger people. In fact, so few older Americans have any experience at all with the latest technological advances (only 22% have ever even used the Internet) that overall attitudes are clearer when one looks at the under-60 group. Focusing on them, it is apparent that some kind of threshold has been crossed: Computers are part of everyday life for most Americans, and the Internet is close behind.

Virtually all Americans under age 60 say they have used a computer (92%), and most of them have used the Internet (75%) or sent an e-mail message (67%) at some point in their lives. In addition, more than 8 in 10 Americans under age 60 currently use a computer at home or work (81%).

Americans under age 60 are enthusiastic about computers and technology. Nearly 9 in 10 (87%) say computers have made life better for Americans, and more than 7 in 10 (72%) say the Internet has made life better. About three-quarters of Americans under age 60 report they like having so much information to choose from (78%) and like the way new technologies allow them to keep in touch (76%). By contrast, only 20% say they are overloaded with information, and only 23% say they don't like the way new technologies let people get in touch with them all the time.

Americans say computers are a necessity at work. More than two-thirds (68%) of working Americans use a computer at work, and 84% of them say it is essential for their jobs. About one-third of working Americans (34%) have access to the Internet at work, and of those who do, 63% say it is essential for their jobs.

Americans under age 60 are rapidly adopting new technologies in their homes. More than half (52%) of those who have a computer at home bought their first computer in the past five years. More than half (53%) of Americans under age 60 now have Internet or e-mail access at home.


The Concerns

Despite their overall positive attitudes, Americans do see some problems with computers and technology. They worry about potential dangers on the Internet, and they want the government to do something about their concerns. Across the board, women are more concerned than men about potential problems of the Internet and even more likely to favor government regulation.



Concerns About Inequality

Polarization. Americans are more likely to say computers widen the gap (45%) in income and opportunity between the haves and have nots in society than to say computers narrow the gap (11%) or do not make much of a difference (39%).

Lending a hand. Most (57%) believe the government should help low-income people get access to computers and the Internet (and 78% say the government should help low-income children).

Concerns About Content

Internet fears. Americans' worries about potential dangers of the Internet include the possibility of dangerous strangers making contact with kids (85% say this is a "major" problem); the availability of pornography to children (84%); and information on how to build bombs (73%). There may be justification for some of these worries; nearly a third (31%) of kids age 10-17 from households with computers (24% of all kids 10-17) say they have seen a pornographic web site.

Concern translates to support for government involvement. More than three-quarters of Americans say the government should do something about the potential for dangerous strangers to make contact with children (79%), the availability of pornography to children (75%), and information on how to build bombs (75%). Americans also say the government should regulate false advertising (62%), the ability to purchase guns (61%), pornography (61%), and hate speech (53%). Furthermore, more than half (57%) of Americans say that "the federal government needs to regulate what is on the Internet more than television and newspapers because the Internet can be used to gain easier access to dangerous information."


Concerns About Personal Impacts

More than half say computers have led people to spend less time with their families and friends (58%). Furthermore, slightly fewer than half (46%) of Americans say that computers have given people less free time, although 24% say computers have given people more free time and 28% say computers haven't made much of a difference.

Privacy concerns are high. More than half of Americans worry that an unauthorized person might gain access to their financial records or personal information on the Internet (59%), with 21% saying they are "very worried." And over half (54%) say the government should do something about loss of privacy on the Internet. Few (4%), however, have experienced such problems themselves.

Digital Divide

Americans over age 60

Americans over age 60 are the most likely to be left out when it comes to computers and technology, but they do not appear to be worried about being left behind. Only around a quarter of Americans over age 60 have computers at home (27%) and use the Internet or e-mail at home (24%). But while three-quarters (75%) of Americans over age 60 recognize that they are being left behind when it comes to computers, only 11% say that not having a computer is a problem for them. The most common reason over-60s without computers give for not having a computer at home is that they don't need one (64%). Nonetheless, more than half of Americans over age 60 say that computers (69%) and the Internet (50%) are making life better for Americans.


Americans under age 60

The "digital divide" also exists among certain groups of people under age 60.

Income and education are key. Americans under age 60 with incomes under $30,000 per year and those with a high school education or less are considerably less likely to use a computer than their higher income and more educated counterparts. For example, 54% of lower-income employed Americans use a computer at work, compared with 81% of those with higher incomes. Furthermore, only 18% of employed people with lower incomes use the Internet at work.

These gaps may be narrowing. Nearly half (48%) of Americans under age 60 who make less than $30,000 now have a computer at home, and 31% have access to the Internet at home. Moreover, the most recent computer owners are more likely to come from the groups who have historically been less likely to be computer owners. Recent computer owners under age 60 (those who purchased their first computer within the past two years) are more likely than longer-term owners to be low-income (30% versus 14%) and to have a high school education or less (59% versus 33%).

Racial differences. While there has been much talk about the digital divide by race, we find that gaps between blacks and whites under age 60 are more pronounced in the home than at work. We also find they are more pronounced at lower-income levels than at higher-income levels. There is a gap of 11 percentage points between blacks and whites using computers at work (46% vs. 57%); but there is a larger, 22 point gap between blacks and whites who have a computer at home (51% vs. 73%). Similarly, a gap of 8 points exists between blacks and whites using the Internet at work (21% vs. 29%) compared with a larger 19 point gap in access to the Internet or e-mail at home (38% vs. 57%). Although there is a 17 percentage point gap in home-computer ownership between low-income blacks and low-income whites, the differences virtually disappear at upper-income levels.

"Have nots" under age 60 generally share positive views about technology with the "haves." The majority of people without computers under age 60, like people with computers, tend to say that computers (76%, 89%) and the Internet (56%, 76%) are making life better for Americans. Most "have nots" and "haves" say that computers will widen the income/opportunity gap (42% and 47%) or make no difference (43% and 38%), though a few say that computers will narrow the gap (13% and 13%). Further more, the "have nots" (85%) and "haves" (87%) say they are not concerned they might lose their jobs because of advances in technology. While "have nots" (74%) are more likely to say they are being left behind by technology than "haves" (35%), only around quarter of "have nots" feel left out because they do not use a computer at work or at home (25%) or feel that not having a computer is a problem for them (24%). The main reason that "have nots" under age 60 give for not having a computer is that they are too expensive (44%).



Kids Are Even More Positive about Computers

Children are more enthusiastic about and comfortable with computers. Eighty-five percent (85%) of kids report that they are keeping up when it comes to computers; only 14% think they are being left behind. Adults, by contrast, are evenly split: 49% say they're keeping up; 49% say they're being left behind. Compared with adults (38%), kids have more trust in the information on the Internet (56%) and less concern about violent games (39% for kids, 56% for adults). On the other hand, kids do admit that computers affect kids' lives. While half (50%) of kids believe computers haven't made much difference in the amount of time kids spend with friends and family, a majority (61%) do believe that the use of computers has led kids to spend less time outdoors, and 63% say they know kids who are addicted to video or computer games.

Kids without computers are more concerned that they are missing something than adults are. Kids without computers at home are far more likely than such adults (42% to 23%) to think that not having a computer at home is a problem, and kids are more likely (37% to 17%) to feel left out because they don't have a computer.

Many kids do see pornography on the Internet. Almost one-third (31%) of kids age 10-17 with computers at home have seen a pornographic website, even if by accident. This is truer for older users: 45% of those 14-17 years old compared with 15% of those 10-13 years old.

Parents are more likely than their kids to think they have rules in place about what their kids can do on the computer. More than three-quarters (76%) of parents say they have rules, but only 57% of their own children agree. More than half of kids (53%) say their parents know "a lot" about the things they do and the sites they visit, but this is considerably truer for younger kids (67% of 10-13 year olds) than for older kids (38% of 14-17 year olds).

Schools appear to be playing an important role in equalizing access to computers for kids. While African-American kids (44%) and kids from lower income households (41%) are considerably less likely to use a computer at home than white kids (76%) or kids from higher income families (83%), virtually the same percent of all kids have used a computer at school (55% of white kids, 60% of African-American kids, 56% of high-income kids, and 59% of low-income kids). Furthermore, kids give their teachers and schools good marks on their ability to teach kids about computers - 87% say their teachers know how to use computers, and 75% say their school has done a pretty good job teaching them about computers.


Methodology

The NPR/Kaiser/Kennedy School Poll is an ongoing project of National Public Radio, the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, and Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Representatives of the three sponsors worked together to develop the survey questionnaire and to analyze the results, with NPR maintaining sole editorial control over its broadcasts on the surveys. The project team includes:



From NPR - Marcus D. Rosenbaum, Special Projects Editor
From the Kaiser Family Foundation - Drew Altman, President and Chief Executive Officer; Mollyann Brodie, Vice President, Director of Public Opinion and Media Research; Rebecca Flournoy, Research Associate

From the Kennedy School - Robert J. Blendon, a Harvard University Professor who holds joint appointments in the School of Public Health and the Kennedy School of Government; John Benson, Deputy Director for Public Opinion and Health/Social Policy at the Harvard School of Public Health

The results of this project are based on two telephone surveys conducted between November 15 and December 19, 1999, with nationally representative samples. The first survey interviewed 1,506 adults, 18 years or older, including an over-sample of African-Americans (results are listed for the total population and for the 1,237 adults under the age of 60 years). The second interviewed 625 children age 10-17 years, including an over-sample of African-American children. (For each survey, the results are weighted to reflect the actual distribution in the nation.) The fieldwork was conducted by ICR/International Communications Research. The margin of sampling error for the adult survey is plus or minus 3 percentage points, and plus or minus 5 percentage points for the survey of children. For results based on subsets of respondents, the margin of error is higher.



Broken Squares

Materials

  • Set of activity pieces


Description

Broken squares is a teambuilding and communication activity. There can be any number of groups of six each (five participants and one judge). The object of the activity is for each member of the team to build a perfect square.


Step-by-Step

  1. Discuss the meaning of cooperation.

  2. Get suggestions from the groups of what is essential for group cooperation.

  3. When the preliminary discussion is finished, the facilitator chooses an observer/judge for each group of five participants.

  4. Each observer is given a copy of the group instructions. The observer hold the prepared packet, unopened, until the signal to work is given.

  5. The facilitator reads the instructions to the groups, allowing for questions.

    1. No member of the group may speak.

    2. No member may ask another member for a card or in any way signal that another person is to give him a card.

    3. Members may, however, give cards to other members on their own.

    4. The observer keeps a record of any non-verbal communication that occurs during the exercise between each group member.

6. Allow 15 minutes for the exercise and fifteen minutes for discussion.

CONTENT STANDARD 2.0 COMMUNICATION
Course Level Expectations

  • CLE 3002.2.5 Understand strategies for expressing ideas clearly and effectively in a variety of oral contexts

  • CLE 3002.2.7 Participate in work teams and group discussions

Checks for Understanding

3002.2.7 Listen actively in group discussions by posing relevant questions and

by eliminating barriers to communication

3002.2.16 Participate productively in self-directed work teams for a particular

purpose (e.g., to interpret literature, solve a problem, make a decision)

State Performance Indicators


  • SPI 3002.2.7 Select the most appropriate strategies for participating productively in a team (e.g., gaining the floor in orderly, respectful ways and listen with civility to the ideas of others; identify the needs of the team and sharing various resources to respond to those needs; establishing clear group agreements and ensuring appropriate individual contributions are respected by the team).



Materials needed:

  • Set of activity pieces




Assessment Activity Title: Broken Squares


Description of Activity:
First, make sure that there are tables enough for each group of six participating. Have each group gather around their own table. The facilitator of the game may wish to begin this exercise with a discussion on the meaning of cooperation. Then, ask for suggestions from the groups of what is essential for group cooperation. Some suggestions the facilitator may want to bring up or write on the board are:

  1. Each individual must understand the problem and how he/she can contribute

in solving the problem.

  1. Each individual should be aware of potential contributions of other individuals.

  2. Understand your own limitations and those of others to help them maximize what their contribution can be.


Assignment Extension:

Have different groups to work together, given less time to complete the task.










I HAVE…WHO HAS? (1 Language)

Materials:


  • I have…who has? Cards


Description:

I have… Who has…? provides students an interactive opportunity to build listening skills and practice


particular skill or concept. This chain-reaction activity may be done with the whole class or in a smaller group.
Step-by Step:

  1. Give each participant two cards, one I have…and one who has. (For a small group you can give some participant 4 cards and for a larger group you can let two people work together—differentiating)

  2. One person will begin by reading his/her who has card. The person with the correct answer will read his/her I have card. Then he/she will ask his/her who has question.

  3. Continue until all cards have been read.

CONTENT STANDARD 1.0 LANGUAGE
Course Level Expectations

  • CLE 3001.1.2, CLE 3002.1.2, CLE 3003.1.2, CLE 3005.1.2 Employ a variety of strategies and resources to determine the definition, pronunciation, etymology, spelling, and usage of words and phrases.


State Performance Indicators

  • SPI 3001.1.12, SPI 3002.1.14 Use context clues and/or knowledge of roots, affixes, and cognates to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words.

  • SPI 3003.1.5 Use previously learned techniques such as recognizing cognates, root words, affixes, allusions, and textual contest to identify unfamiliar words.


Materials needed:

• Envelopes with I have…who has cards.



Assessment Activity Title: I have…Who has?



Description of Activity:

Distribute cards with affixes and roots. Begin asking questions and answering.


Assignment Extensions:

This activity can be used to review many skills.






I have

Before


I have
Far

Who has
ante as in antebellum or anterior?

Who has
tele as in telephone or telescope?


I have

Against


I have

Before


Who has
anti as in antibody and anticlimax?


Who has
pre as in premature or premonition?




I have
Two

I have
Kill

Who has

bi as in bilateral or bicycle



Who has
cide as in suicide or genocide?

I have

Around


I have

U\under


Who has
circum as in circumspect or circumvent?



Who has
sub as in subtract or subway?


I have

Bad


I have

Five


Who has
mal as in malevolent or malicious?



Who has

penta as in pentagon or pentameter?



I have

False


I have

Again


Who has
pseudo as in pseudo pod or pseudonym?

Who has
re as in reiterate or regenerate?





I have
write.

I have
Sound

Who has
scribe as in ascribe or transcribe?

Who has
phon as in telephone or phonograph?


I have
science.

I have
Good

Who has
logy as in geology or mythology?

Who has
bene as in benefit or benevolent?




I have
go.

I have

Place


Who has
cede as in antecedent or secede?

Who has
loco as in location or dislocate?

I have

opinion.


I have
Water

Who has
dox as in orthodox or doxology?

Who has
hydro as in hydrant or hydrophobia?

I have
doctrine.

I have
Between

Who has
ism as in capitalism and pluralism?



Who has
inter as in international or interject?

I have
fear.

I have
Life

Who has
phobia as in hydrophobia and claustrophobia?


Who has
bio as in biography or biogenesis?

I have
mother.



I have
nook.

Who has
matri as in matricide or matriarch?

Who has
biblio as in bibliography or bibliophile?

I have
look.

I have
Same

Who has
scope as in telescope or periscope?

Who has
homo as in homogenize or homophone?

I have
Ten

I have
Look

Who has
dec as in decade or decimal?

Who has
spec as in spectacles and spectator?

I have
bind.


I have
Hang

Who has
string as in astringent or stringy?

Who has
pend as in pendulum or impending?

I have
Free

I have
one hundred

Who has
liber as in liberty and deliberate?

Who has
cent as in century or centipede?


Learning Stations

Materials

Folders with activities


Description

Learning stations are a fun way for students to work together to review and work on the standards. A folder with an activity is placed in different areas of the classroom (folders can be given to student groups and passed). Each group has a set amount of time to complete the activity.



Step-by-Step

  1. Divide students into groups of three or four.

  2. One student from each group will need to take pencil and paper to each station.

  3. The students will read the directions and complete the activity.

  4. Give each group about 10 minute at each station. Tell them it is okay if they do not finish, but they need to work diligently to complete as much as they can.

  5. Go back together and discuss the activities and answers.


Learning Stations (Can Address All Standards)
Course Level Expectations

  • CLE 3002.1.2 Employ a variety of strategies and resources to determine the definition, pronunciation, etymology, spelling, and usage of words and phrases.
  • CLE 3002.1.9 Demonstrate understanding of common foreign words and phrases.


  • CLE 3002.4.4 Write an extended research paper, using primary and secondary sources and technology and graphics, as appropriate.

  • CLE 3002.5.1 Use logic to make inferences and draw conclusions in a variety of challenging oral and written contest.

  • CLE 3002.8.5 Know and use appropriate literary terms to derive meaning and comprehension from various literary genres.



State Performance Indicators

  • SPI 3002.1.14 Use context clues and/or knowledge of roots, affixes, and cognates to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words.

  • SPI 3002.1. 17 Identify commonly used foreign words and phrases.

  • SPI 3002.2.2 Distinguish between a summary and a paraphrase

  • SPI 3002.2.5 Identify rhetorical devices used in a challenging speech

  • SPI 3002.4.2 Differentiate between primary and secondary sources.

  • SPI 3002.5.11 Identify the main claim, premise(s), evidence, or conclusion of a given argument.

  • SPI 3002.6.3 Use graphics of informational and technical passages to answer questions.

  • SPI 3002.8.1 Identify examples of idiom, metaphor, simile, personification, hyperbole, or pun in poetry or prose.

  • SPI 3002.8.6 Differentiate between mood and tone in poetry or prose.

Materials needed:


  • Folders with activities

  • Pencil and paper

Assessment Activity Title: Learning Stations


Description of Activity:

  1. Divide students into groups of three or four.

  2. One student from each group will need to take pencil and paper to each station.

  3. The students will read the directions and complete the activity.

  4. Give each group about 10 minute at each station. Tell them it is okay if they do not finish, but they need to work diligently to complete as much as they can.

  5. Go back together and discuss the activities and answers.



Assignment Extensions:

Create activities to address other CLE’s and SPI’s



Use a separate sheet of paper for you work. Your group will do two activities.
I As a group, rewrite a scene from a well-known fairy tale incorporating foreign phrases into the story. Follow the plot of the story; don’t change it except for the inclusion of the foreign phrases. Read the example below for inspiration.
One day, while Madame Bear, Monsieur Bear, and Baby Bear were on a walk, an enfant

terrible
approached their home. Goldilocks must have thought she had carte blanche; she

tried to open the door to the bears’ home, and it was a fait accompli in no time! This was a terrible faux pas! Since it was against the law, the incident may have become a cause



célèbre. Without so much as a “merci,” she ate their porridge and looked around with the

savoir-faire of an experienced burglar…..

II. Make a comic strip that explains or highlights at least five (5) foreign phrases. Someone reading the comic strip should be able to understand the phrases within the context of the comic. Make the comic strip relevant to our study.


Foreign Phrases


  1. RSVP—please respond




  1. déjà vu--the experience of feeling sure that one has witnessed or experienced a new situation previously




  1. faux pas--: a social blunder




  1. du jour--made for a particular day




  1. bon voyage—have a nice trip




  1. alma mater--the school, college, or university that one has attended




  1. cum laude--with praise; an honor added to a diploma or degree for work above average.




  1. femme fatale--an alluring and seductive woman whose charms ensnare her lovers in bonds of irresistible desire




  1. esprit de corps--group spirit; sense of pride, honor, etc. shared by those in the same group or undertaking




  1. verbatim--an exact reproduction of a sentence, phrase, quote or other sequence of text from one source into another.




  1. E pluribus unum—out of many, one




  1. prima donna—first lady




  1. avant-garde--a pushing of the boundaries of what is accepted as the norm or the status quo, primarily in the cultural realm.




  1. status quo--the present, existing state of affairs




  1. joie de vivre--a term used to express a cheerful enjoyment of life


  1. carte blanche--unrestricted power to act at one's own discretion; unconditional authority




  1. caveat emptor--the axiom or principle in commerce that the buyer alone is responsible for assessing the quality of a purchase before buying




  1. alpha and omega—the beginning and the end




  1. tabula rasa--thesis that individual human beings are born with no innate or built-in mental content, in a word, "blank", and that their entire resource of knowledge is built up gradually from their experiences and sensory perceptions




  1. hoi polloi—the masses; the people




  1. ad nauseam--used to describe something that has been continuing "to the point of nausea."




  1. tempus fugit—time flies




  1. c’est la vie—That’s life




  1. bona fide--made in good faith without fraud or deceit




  1. savoir faire--literally "know how to do"; to respond appropriately to any situation




  1. non sequitur—it does not follow




  1. id est--that is (to say)




  1. enfant terrible--a child who is terrifyingly candid by saying embarrassing things to adults, especially parents




  1. terra firma—solid earth




  1. vox populi--literally means voice of the people

Paraphrasing Craze



  • Paraphrasing is putting it in your own words.

  • To paraphrase—read carefully. Then set the material aside and change what was read into new words.

  • Avoid plagiarism at all costs

  • .Keep the message of the author in your translation even if it required more words than the original.

  • Summarizing is restating only the main points of the passage in your own words. It is very brief.

  • Quoting is using the exact words of the author of the passage. It gives the author credit for these words.

Read the original passage and select the best paraphrase. Write your answers on a separate sheet of paper



1. The original passage: Students frequently overuse direct quotation in taking notes, and as a result they overuse quotations in the final [research] paper. Probably only about 10% of your final manuscript should appear as directly quoted matter. Therefore, you should strive to limit the amount of exact transcribing of source materials while taking notes. Lester, James D. Writing Research Papers. 2nd ed. (1976): 46-47.

  1. In research papers students often quote excessively, failing to keep quoted material down to a desirable level. Since the problem usually originates during note taking, it is essential to minimize the material recorded verbatim (Lester 46-47).



  1. Students should take just a few notes in direct quotation from sources to help minimize the amount of quoted material in a research paper (Lester 46-47).


  1. Students often use too many direct quotations when they take notes, resulting in too many of them in the final research paper. In fact, probably only about 10% of the final copy should consist of directly quoted material. So it is important to limit the amount of source material copied while taking notes.


2. Poe’s original: "I kept quite still and said nothing.  For a whole hour I did not move a muscle, and in the meantime I did not hear him lie down.  He was still sitting up in the bed listening, --just as I have done, night after night, hearkening to the death watches in the wall."

a. "I kept quite still and said nothing.  For a whole hour I did not move a muscle, and in the meantime I did not hear him lie down.  He was still sitting up in the bed listening, --just as I have done, night after night, hearkening to the death watches in the wall."

b. For an hour, I kept very still and never heard him lie down.  He was listening to the deathwatch beetles in the wall as I have done before.

c. For the whole hour, I was completely still.  I never heard him lie down.  He was sitting up listening to the sounds in the wall that made him feel as if something was terribly wrong.   I have done this myself many times before.




  1   2   3
:)


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page

:)