H erts English Team English Department



Download 148.36 Kb.
Date conversion17.01.2017
Size148.36 Kb.

H



erts English Team

English Department


Title of unit: Superheroes

Year: 8

Term:

Duration: 18 lessons

Overview:

  • This scheme is designed to support the teaching of the key reading strategies students need to develop in preparation for SATs-style reading tasks through the genre of Superheroes; tasks based on writing narrative are also included.

  • The scheme enables students to develop their use of ICT in a variety of ways, inc. the use of film-making software, but does not have to rely heavily on the use of computers if this is impractical for classrooms that are not suitably designed for this aspect of the unit.

  • The activities are designed for teachers to pick and choose or adapt as appropriate.

Key Outcomes:


  • A piece of narrative written in the style of a Superhero story

  • A section of a graphic novel

  • A storyboard or a short film considering the role of the director and the use of mise-en-scene

  • An essay analysing the use of mise-en-scene and cinematography in film

APP Focuses:

Reading AF3 - deduce, infer or interpret information, events or ideas from texts


Reading AF6 - identify and comment on writers’ purposes and viewpoints, and the overall effect of the text on the reader.


Outline of Scheme:

Week

Key Question

Activities

1

Which reading techniques can be used to analyse the main traits of a superhero and a super-villain?

Range of images and film clips used to design a superhero and a super-villain to eventually become the main characters in their own superhero stories

2

What are the key features of a stereotypical superhero story?

Students create an advertisement in role then use skimming, scanning, inference and deduction skills to elicit main features of a superhero plot

3

How do considered vocabulary choices create a range of effects in writing?

Analysis of extracts from novels and graphic novels to enable students to create a section of their own superhero stories in two different forms

4

What is the director’s role in film-making and how does mise-en-scene create effects on the audience?

Study of film clips to support students in creating either a storyboard or a filmed scene from their stories, making carefully considered visual and audio choices as directors


5

How does a director use mise-en-scene to ensure that the audience fully understands the key messages of his/her film?

Students write an analytical essay using PEE techniques; can be assessed using APP Reading Assessment Focuses 3 and 6

6

This week should be spent further developing one task from the scheme; choice of this key piece of work will depend on ICT access and strengths displayed by class over past five weeks.


Key Concepts:

Creativity

  1. Making fresh connections between ideas, experiences, texts and words, drawing on a rich experience of language and literature.

Critical understanding

a. Exploring others’ ideas and developing their own.



  1. Analysing and evaluating spoken and written language to appreciate how meaning is shaped.





Personalised Learning and Thinking Skills (PLTSs):


  • Creative thinkers

  • Reflective learners



Key Processes:
Speaking and listening

k) use different dramatic techniques to convey action, character, atmosphere and tension

l) explore the ways that words, actions, sound and staging combine to create dramatic moments

Reading

a) extract and interpret information, events, main points and ideas from texts


b) infer and deduce meanings, recognising the writers’ intentions

f) recognise & discuss different interpretations of texts, justifying their own views on what they read and see, & supporting them with evidence

i) understand how meaning is created through the combination of words, images and sounds in multimodal texts

j) how texts are crafted to shape meaning and produce particular effects

k) how writers structure and organise different texts, including non-linear and multimodal

Writing

a) write clearly and coherently, including an appropriate level of detail

m) develop logical arguments and cite evidence

p) present material clearly, using appropriate layout, illustrations and organisation
N.B. For personalisation and objective options per year, see ‘Key Learning Objectives’ sheet.



Resources List:


Week 1

(1) Reading Strategies card sort activity

(2) Superhero images (in colour if possible)

(3) X-Men image

(4) Superhero symbols

(5) Superhero Scenarios OHT

Spiderman I film (chapters 11/12)

Star Wars III – A New Hope film (chapters 46/47)

Week 2

(6) Advertising Taglines OHT

Selection of adverts

Clip of Mystery Men – beginning of ch.3 (14 minutes and 23 seconds into film)

(7) Fine art images with thought bubbles

(8) Superman graphic novel extract, cut up with captions removed

(9) Superman graphic novel extract in full

(10) Blank comic strip

Episode from a Superhero series


Week 3

(11) Extract from Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

(12) Single images from X-Men graphic novel with captions removed

(13) Single images from X-Men graphic novel

(14) Superhero Top Trumps cards

Page from graphic novel (could use Superman extract from previous week or one of students’ own choice)

Week 4

Clip of Superhero film with striking cinematography

(15) Mise-en-Scene OHT

Selection of pieces of music, preferably including some classical and contemporary examples

Week 5

Opening scene of ‘Batman Begins’

Mise-en-Scene OHT

(16) Mise-en-Scene note-making grid (without notes first, then sharing filled in grid afterwards)

(17) APP Reading Assessment Focus grids (AF3 and AF6)


(18) Exemplar paragraph of essay based on ‘Batman Begins’

(19) APP Reading Assessment Focus ladders and criteria (AF3 and AF6)



Superheroes Scheme of Work

Key Learning Objectives


Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Speaking and Listening


Key Processes:

j) use different dramatic approaches to explore ideas, texts and issues

k) use different dramatic techniques to convey action, character, atmosphere and tension

l) explore the ways that words, actions, sound and staging combine to create dramatic moments.

Framework Objectives

4 Drama, role-play and performance

4.1 Using different dramatic approaches to explore ideas, texts and issues


explore ideas, texts and issues through a variety of dramatic approaches and conventions

use specific dramatic approaches and conventions in structured ways for effective exploration of ideas, texts, issues and themes

use a wide variety of dramatic approaches and conventions to analyse complex and challenging ideas, issues, themes and texts

4.2 Developing, adapting and responding to dramatic techniques, conventions and styles


work on their own and with others to develop dramatic processes, narratives, performances or roles

develop and sustain processes, narratives, performances and roles through the use of a variety of dramatic conventions, techniques and styles

develop and sustain a variety of processes, narratives, performances and roles through the selection and adaptation of appropriate dramatic conventions, techniques and styles

comment on the effectiveness of the different dramatic conventions and techniques used

evaluate the impact and effectiveness of a range of dramatic conventions and techniques

analyse and explain, in and out of role, the use, impact and effect of different dramatic conventions and techniques

Reading

Key Processes:

a) extract and interpret information, events, main points and ideas from texts

b) infer and deduce meanings, recognising the writers’ intentions

f) recognise and discuss different interpretations of texts, justifying their own views on what they read and see, and supporting them with evidence

i) understand how meaning is created through the combination of words, images and sounds in multimodal texts j) how texts are crafted to shape meaning and produce particular effects

k) how writers structure and organise different texts, including non-linear and multimodal

Framework Objectives: 5 Reading for meaning: understanding and responding to print, electronic and multi-modal texts

5.1 Developing and adapting active reading skills and strategies

extract the main points and relevant information from a text or source using a range of strategies such as skimming and scanning


use a range of reading strategies to retrieve relevant information and main points from texts, distinguishing between fact and opinion where appropriate

select from a range of strategies and use the most appropriate ways to locate, retrieve and compare information and ideas from a variety of texts

use inference and deduction to recognise implicit meanings at sentence and text level

use inference and deduction to explore layers of meaning within a text

use a repertoire of reading strategies to analyse and explore different layers of meaning within texts

make relevant notes when gathering ideas from texts

make relevant notes when researching different sources, comparing and contrasting information

make relevant notes in a range of formats and approaches when researching a variety of sources

5.2 Understanding and responding to ideas, viewpoints, themes and purposes in texts


identify and understand the main ideas, viewpoints, themes and purposes in a text

trace the development of a writer's ideas, viewpoint and themes

analyse and respond to the range of ideas and differing viewpoints, purposes and themes in a variety of related texts

make a personal response to a text and provide some textual reference in support

respond to a text by making precise points and providing relevant evidence in support of those points


develop interpretations of texts, supporting points with detailed textual evidence

6 Understanding the author's craft

6.2 Analysing how writers' use of linguistic and literary features shapes and influences meaning


identify and describe the effect of writers' use of specific literary, rhetorical and grammatical features

explore the range, variety and overall effect on readers of literary, rhetorical and grammatical features used by writers of literary and non-literary texts

analyse in depth and detail writers' use of literary, rhetorical and grammatical features and their effects on different readers

6.3 Analysing writers' use of organisation, structure, layout and presentation


explore the range of different ways writers use layout, form and presentation in a variety of texts

explain how specific choices and combinations of form, layout and presentation create particular effects

analyse how meaning is conveyed differently according to the form, layout and presentation selected by the writer for specific purposes

explore the variety and range of ways the content of texts can be organised, structured and combined

explain how specific structural and organisational choices in texts create particular effects


analyse how meaning can be conveyed in different ways according to structural and organisational choices at sentence and text level

Writing

Key Processes:

a) write clearly and coherently, including an appropriate level of detail m) develop logical arguments and cite evidence p) present material clearly, using appropriate layout, illustrations and organisation

Framework Objectives Writing – 8 Composition: shaping and constructing language for expression and effect

8.1 Developing viewpoint, voice and ideas


develop character and voice in their own fiction writing

draw on some techniques and devices used by writers in order to develop distinctive character and voice in their own fiction

establish and sustain distinctive character, point of view and voice in their fiction writing by drawing on a wide range of techniques and devices used by writers

develop their own viewpoint, drawing on evidence, opinions and the particular purpose of the task

select techniques and devices used by writers, and draw on a range of evidence, opinions, information and the purpose of the task, in order to develop a consistent viewpoint in their own non-fiction writing

establish and sustain a clear and logical personal viewpoint through the analysis and selection of convincing evidence, opinions and appropriate information, and other techniques used by writers to meet the purpose of the task

8.4 Developing varied linguistic and literary techniques


develop in their own writing some of the key linguistic and literary techniques used by writers, and deploy them for deliberate effect on the reader

draw on a repertoire of linguistic and literary techniques, and select those most appropriate for creating specific effects in their own writing

elicit a range of responses from the reader, having made a judgement about the effectiveness of specific linguistic and literary techniques in particular contexts or for specific tasks

8.5 Structuring, organising and presenting texts in a variety of forms on paper and on screen


make ideas and purpose clear by appropriate use of paragraphs and by choosing from a range of linking words and phrases

use a range of cohesive devices with audience and purpose in mind, drawing on experience of how writers develop and connect ideas within and between paragraphs

shape and craft language within individual paragraphs, and structure ideas between them, to achieve particular literary, transactional or rhetorical effects with purpose and audience in mind

shape the overall organisation, sequence and presentation of a text to convey ideas clearly and effectively

experiment with different ways of presenting texts, drawing on a range of modes, formats and media with the needs of the reader in mind

select the most appropriate text format, layout and presentation to create impact and engage the reader




POSSIBLE TEACHING SEQUENCE

Week 1
Key Learning Objectives

RESOURCES:

Speaking and Listening

Framework Objectives

4.1 Using different dramatic approaches to explore ideas, texts and issues

4.2 Developing, adapting and responding to dramatic techniques, conventions and styles


Reading

Framework Objectives

5.1 Developing and adapting active reading skills and strategies

5.2 Understanding and responding to ideas, viewpoints, themes and purposes in texts

6.2 Analysing how writers' use of linguistic and literary features shapes and influences meaning



(1) Reading Strategies card sort activity

(2) Superhero images (in colour if possible)

(3) X-Men image

(4) Superhero symbols

(5) Superhero Scenarios OHT

Spiderman I film (chapters 11/12)

Star Wars III – A New Hope film (chapters 46/47)

TEACHING IDEAS:


Lesson 1

Starter:


  • Students use card sort activity to match reading strategies(1) with definitions to engage with the key skills they will be developing during this scheme of work and in preparation for SATs style reading techniques.

Development:

  • Discuss what makes a good ‘Superhero’ story; students list as many different superheroes they can think of in 3 minutes then, as a class, define the key elements of this genre (identifying stereotypical characters, plot, settings…etc);

  • Use close reading skills to analyse the appearance of a superhero; give pairs of students an image of a superhero or a super-villain(2) and annotate, getting them to elicit what their costumes tells us about the character, looking at how they are represented through colour and overall physical appearance;

  • Share findings and discuss differences; students then either pick their favourite superhero/super-villain or choose one already discussed and write one paragraph explaining in detail what his/her costume represents to the reader.

Plenary:

  • Selection of students to read aloud paragraphs and generate discussion on ideas as appropriate.



Lesson 2

Starter:

  • Using visualising skills, in pairs, one student must describe an image(3) and partner must draw what is being described; explain that the better the description used, the more accurate the drawn image will be as a result.

Development:

  • Look at representation of symbols; students must analyse a range of superhero symbols(4); discuss how they represent power and strength;


  • Students should then individually decide what their ideal super-power would be and how their costume might look if they were a superhero; then in pairs or small groups, students must design an original superhero and a super-villain (who will eventually be the main characters in the superhero story that they will create in subsequent lessons) - students can either sketch their characters or use play-dough (use your own judgement on what would be most appropriate for the class you are teaching!) but can only use a maximum of three colours for each character; a symbol should be designed for each one too.

Plenary:

  • Students must annotate their images, explaining their choices and what they are supposed to symbolise.


Lesson 3

Starter:

  • Give students a range of scenarios(5); students must decide what they would do to resolve situation if they were a) themselves, b) Superman and c) Lex Luther

Development:
  • Elicit definition for the word empathy; discuss differences between heroes and villains in literature and film; watch two film clips, each showing the final moment that motivates one character to become a superhero and one character to become a super-villain (recommended suggestion: moment in Spiderman 1 where Peter Parker first uses his powers to make money and his uncle dies (ch. 9-12) and moment in Star Wars when Padme dies giving birth and Darth Vader is fully born (ch. 46/47); whilst the students are watching these clips, they should be looking for the answer to the question: ‘What is the key difference in these two characters that makes one live to fight ‘evil’ and the other to fight ‘good’?’; clips should generate group and then class discussion looking at personality and motivation of character.


Plenary:

  • Students should list key character traits for their own superheroes and super-villains and what motivates them;

  • If time, they could then perform an interview using role-play, with the interviewer asking questions regarding what makes their superhero so special – why will he/she win the day, what his/her weaknesses might be…etc.


Outcomes





  • Analysis of images related to the superhero

  • Group and whole class discussion regarding motivation of character

  • Plan beginning of a superhero story – key characters




Week 2
Key Learning Objectives


Speaking and Listening

Framework Objectives

4.1 Using different dramatic approaches to explore ideas, texts and issues


Reading

Framework Objectives:

5.2 Understanding and responding to ideas, viewpoints, themes and purposes in texts

6.2 Analysing how writers' use of linguistic and literary features shapes and influences meaning

6.3 Analysing writers' use of organisation, structure, layout and presentation




RESOURCES:

(6) Advertising Taglines OHT

Selection of adverts

Clip of Mystery Men – beginning of ch.3 (14 minutes and 23 seconds into film)

(7) Fine art images with thought bubbles

(8) Superman graphic novel extract, cut up with captions removed

(9) Superman graphic novel extract in full

(10) Blank comic strip

Episode from a Superhero series
TEACHING IDEAS:
Lesson 1

Starter:

  • Give list of taglines from a range of famous adverts(6); students to identify products being advertised, using inference if unsure; share answers and discuss how they knew/guessed answers

Development:

  • Show a selection of adverts; identify what makes them effective, eliciting importance of target audience and what impact this has on them;

  • Develop this by asking students what they think would be an appropriate product for their superheroes to advertise; show clip of Mystery Men where Captain Amazing advertises toothpaste;

  • Set task: to create a 30 second advert advertising a product using students’ superhero as the ‘sponsor’; adverts must include a tag-line (could use this as an opportunity to use digital/video cameras if available; students could watch their performances and make improvements after evaluating first attempt)

Plenary:
  • Students to perform adverts and peer-assess after each one, identifying strengths and weaknesses (could set students self-evaluation task for homework)





Lesson 2

Starter:

  • Give students worksheet with fine art pictures(7); students must add a speech/thought bubble for each character; each student/group must be given one mood to reflect in each comment (eg. fear, happiness, humour, despair…etc).

Development:

  • Using skimming and scanning skills, students should piece together scene from Superman graphic novel with words deleted(8a&b);

  • Before showing answer, conduct class discussion discussing how the images help to move the plot on, then give them copy of actual scene(9a&b); students should then pick one character and add thought bubbles, using inference skills to deduce what the character is thinking.

Plenary:

  • In pairs, make a list of at least five things that make this scene specifically a superhero plot; share with another group to generate discussion.



Lesson 3

Starter:

  • Using graphic novel scene from last lesson, students must predict what will happen next in the story(10).

Development:

  • Show one episode from a superhero series (eg. Superman (an early episode from the series starring Dean Cain and Teri Hatcher would work well), Wonder Woman, Batman or a recent animated version of Spiderman or X-Men); discuss what might be missing in comparison to a feature film based around superheroes;
  • Make a class display of what elements are needed in an effective superhero plot-line (could either be done in groups as posters or key words with definitions as appropriate).


Plenary:

  • Pairs/groups to brainstorm plot for own superhero story, ensuring that they incorporate key features identified earlier in lesson.

Outcomes:





  • Produce an advert for television in role of superhero

  • Analysis of plot from superhero genre

  • Continue planning own superhero stories: plot






Week 3
Key Learning Objectives


Reading

Framework Objectives

6.2 Analysing how writers' use of linguistic and literary features shapes and influences meaning

6.3 Analysing writers' use of organisation, structure, layout and presentation


Writing

Framework Objectives:

8.1 Developing viewpoint, voice and ideas

8.4 Developing varied linguistic and literary techniques

8.5 Structuring, organising and presenting texts in a variety of forms on paper and on screen




RESOURCES:

(11) Extract from Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire


(12) Single images from X-Men graphic novel with captions removed

(13) Single images from X-Men graphic novel

(14) Superhero Top Trumps cards

Page from graphic novel (could use Superman extract from previous week or one of students’ own choice)

TEACHING IDEAS:
Lesson 1

Starter:


  • Students must produce a flow chart of plot devised for own superhero stories.

Development:

  • Students pick a key moment from their plots; explain that they will be presenting this scene in three different forms:

1. written in prose as a chapter of a novel,

2. in the form of a section of a graphic novel,

3. as a performance for part of a feature film.


  • Share an extract from Harry Potter(11); do close reading analysis as a class identifying what makes it an effective piece of writing;

  • Students must then write first paragraph of the chapter for their own stories (model this first showing how and why you use the techniques you choose to use).

Plenary:

  • Students to peer-assess work, annotating areas of strength and setting target for improvement; students can then use this criticism to write rest of chapter for homework.



Lesson 2

Starter:
  • Show image from X-Men graphic novel with speech removed(12); students to predict what the caption should say and explain the reasons for their choices. Share actual caption(13).


Development:

  • Discuss fact that although image is the most striking part of any novel, choice of words used is also key; elicit idea that each character only has a limited number of word to say/think so must be very carefully chosen;

  • Analyse a page from a graphic novel (you could use the Superman extract from the previous week or ask students to bring in examples of their own), discussing why particular words/phrases have been chosen and discussing images used and impact this has on reader in terms of understanding plot character and theme;

  • Using the chosen scene from their own stories, in groups/pairs, students should create 5 tableaux of the key moments in the scene, with a ‘narrator’ reading one caption for each tableau; share and evaluate.

Plenary:

  • Sketch out the images in graphic novel from, incorporating ideas from tableaux and writing captions, speech and thought bubbles.



Lesson 3

Starter:

  • Play ‘Superhero Top Trumps’(14); in pairs, students should decide on a rating from 1-10 for each category (this can be written on in non-permanent OHP pen if the cards are laminated so that they can be wiped clean and used again); they should then have half the cards each and ‘call’ different categories based on their knowledge of each character – the highest rating each time wins the pair.

Development:

  • Students should use this time to develop the work from the last two lessons, so that by the end of this week, they have completed a piece of prose and a graphic novel section based on the scene from their stories.

Plenary:


  • Selected students should read aloud/share their work and set own targets in light of comments made.

Outcomes:





  • Write first chapter of superhero stories

  • Analyse and create section of graphic novel






Week 4
Key Learning Objectives



Reading

Framework Objectives

6.2 Analysing how writers' use of linguistic and literary features shapes and influences meaning

6.3 Analysing writers' use of organisation, structure, layout and presentation


Writing

Framework Objectives

8.5 Structuring, organising and presenting texts in a variety of forms on paper and on screen




RESOURCES:

Clip of Superhero film with striking cinematography

(15) Mise-en-Scene OHT

Selection of pieces of music, preferably including some classical and contemporary examples

TEACHING IDEAS:

Lesson 1

Starter:
  • Students to pick their favourite film and list everything they like about it (eg. key lines, favourite characters, best moment…etc); read list to a friend whose task is to guess film being described.


Development:

  • Introduce idea that the role of a director in a film is comparable to role of an author when writing a novel;

  • Show a five-minute clip of a superhero film (recommendations include ‘V For Vendetta’ or ‘Van Helsing’, both of which use colour and cinematography to create specific atmospheres); whilst watching the clip, students must make notes on everything they notice about use of colour, settings, characters, props, music and sound effects…etc;

  • Introduce concept of mise-en-scene using OHT(15) then re-play film clip, pausing every few moments to explain explicitly how the director’s use of mise-en-scene symbolises meaning and how we as an audience glean understanding of both surface plot and character but also key themes;

  • Discuss how colour in particular can represent different moods, getting students to identify what different colours represent, then show a second clip and get students to make notes; they can then write a commentary explaining how the use of colour impacts on audience perception of the film.

Plenary:

  • Produce ‘colour chart’ showing what different colours can represent, which can be referred to in the next couple of lessons.







Lesson 2

Starter:

  • Using the ‘key scene’ from their superhero stories, students should discuss in groups how they would want it filmed as part of a feature film.

Development:
  • Depending on the resources within your department, you can choose one of the two following options to develop the rest of this week’s lessons, by either:


  1. getting the groups to make a two-minute clip of their film using digital camcorders and editing technology

  2. getting groups to create detailed storyboards, preferably using computers to free them up from spending too long drawing and instead giving them the opportunity to concentrate more on use of colour and setting, and then allow them to act it out

Plenary: This will depend on the activity you are pursuing with the class

Lesson 3

Starter:

  • Listen to a range of different pieces of music, all approximately 30 seconds long; either individually or in pairs, students should record what atmosphere each piece creates

Development:

  • Give students some time to choose what music they want to use in their film clips/acted scenes then let students use rest of lesson to work on their projects.

Plenary:

  • Students should be given time to show their performances to the rest of the class and assess accordingly.


nb.: this week’s lessons could be extended to an extra week if desired, spending time analysing how to write a piece of script as well as spending time showing how to edit film using programmes such as ‘Windows Movie Maker’ or equivalent.

Outcomes:


  • Analysis of role of director and mise-en-scene in film-making

  • Either film a short section of first scene of superhero film or create a storyboard, considering use of symbolism and mise-en-scene as key focus




Week 5

Key Learning Objectives

RESOURCES:

Reading

Framework objectives

5.1 Developing and adapting active reading skills and strategies

5.2 Understanding and responding to ideas, viewpoints, themes and purposes in texts

6.2 Analysing how writers' use of linguistic and literary features shapes and influences meaning

6.3 Analysing writers' use of organisation, structure, layout and presentation


Writing

Framework Objectives

8.1 Developing viewpoint, voice and ideas



Opening scene of ‘Batman Begins’

Mise-en-Scene OHT

(16) Mise-en-Scene note-making grid (without notes first, then sharing filled in grid afterwards)

(17) APP Reading Assessment Focus grids (AF3 and AF6)

(18) Exemplar paragraph of essay based on ‘Batman Begins’

(19) APP Reading Assessment Focus ladders and criteria (AF3 and AF6)
TEACHING IDEAS:

Lesson 1

Starter:

  • Remind students of term ‘mise-en-scene’, then watch opening sequence of ‘Batman Begins’ and ask students to make notes on what they see in ‘striking moments’ column of mise-en-scene grid(16).


Development:

  • Explain key focus for the week: to write an essay, using PEE, commenting on the director’s craft in filmmaking, giving students opportunity to explain and justify the choices they made/would make for their film clips; students should use knowledge gained from previous lessons to fill in second column in grid about symbols in film; after 10 minutes, students should share ideas and compare notes (you can use example grid provided for comparison after they have looked at each other’s ideas).

  • Set essay: How does a director use mise-en-scene to ensure that the audience fully understands the key messages of his/her film?

  • Share the key assessment focuses(17) students will be working on and the levelling criteria on which they will be assessed; students should use this information to devise their own writing frames to aid them in writing this style of essay; this could then be shared through whole-class discussion, resulting in a universal writing frame that students could use in next two lessons.

Plenary:

  • Students should make some notes about what points they want to make in each paragraph, either on the film they have been developing or on a clip of your choice, depending on the ability of the class






Lesson 2

Starter:
  • Remind students of how to use PEE in their writing and show one exemplar paragraph(18) of how this should look, using the Batman Begins mise-en-scene grid to guide the writing.


Development:

  • Students should spend this lesson writing their essays, using the APP grids for Reading AFs 3 and 6 for guidance as appropriate (19a&b); depending on the ability of the class, students should either be left to develop their writing or you can break it down paragraph by paragraph if extended writing time is unrealistic for your group.

Plenary:

  • Do self- and then peer-assessment on work done so far this lesson using the assessment criteria from the APP materials (if possible, it would be useful for the purposes of the next lesson if students could finish the first draft of their essays as homework)



Lesson 3

Starter:

  • Students should read through their own essays and use the marking criteria to highlight any areas they feel they need to change or improve

Development:

  • Discuss the difference between proofreading and editing and give an example of how to improve a piece of writing; the students should then do this with their own work, setting themselves targets for improvement and begin writing up their essays in neat.

Plenary:

  • Students should read their redrafts so far and evaluate whether or not they have met the targets they set themselves before re-writing their work.



Outcomes:


  • Written essay analysing director’s craft in filmmaking





Week 6
RESOURCES:

TEACHING IDEAS:



  • This week should be used to develop any aspect of the scheme that is ongoing; the main focus will depend on availability of ICT/resources.







The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page