Historic Archaeological Component Form Instructions



Download 251.09 Kb.
Page1/4
Date conversion08.04.2017
Size251.09 Kb.
  1   2   3   4
History Colorado - Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation

Colorado Cultural Resource Survey

Historic Archaeological Component Form Instructions
This form should be completed for each historical resource with archaeological potential and attached to a completed Management Data Form. Additional copies of the form may be used to describe individual features. Please note at the top of the form if the form pertains to the historical archaeological component in general or to a particular feature. Please see the Colorado Cultural Resource Survey Manual for detailed information concerning many of these categories.
1. Resource Number: Please put the resource number (Smithsonian trinomial number) here, as it appears on the Management Data Form.
2. Temporary Resource Number: List any temporary numbers assigned in the field.
3. Site Name: Please put the site name here, as it appears on the Management Data Form.
4. Site or Feature: Check if this form pertains to the entire site in general. If no, please supply a feature/structure number or name to which the form applies.
5. Site, Component, or Feature Type: Describe the type of site/feature, specifying function if known. Examples of site, component, or feature types can be found in Appendix A of these instructions.

6. Narrative History: The narrative history should be focused on the history of this property and directly pertain to the property's historic significance and integrity.  The description should include both a synthesis of the artifacts and features and any additional important information. You may wish to complete parts 19, 22, and 24 before writing this section. Please see National Register Bulletin: How to Complete the National Register Registration Form page 47, http://www.nps.gov/nr/publications/bulletins/nrb16a/


This narrative is the most important section of the form. Please be as complete as possible.

7. N.R.H.P. Historic Landscape: Indicate, by checking the appropriate box, whether the resource is located in a cultural or historic landscape. A cultural landscape is defined as "a geographic area, including both cultural and natural resources and the wildlife or domestic animals therein, associated with a historic event, activity, or person or exhibiting other cultural or aesthetic values." There are four general types of cultural landscapes, which are not mutually exclusive: historic sites, historic designed landscapes, historic vernacular landscapes, and ethnographic landscapes. (see http://www.nps.gov/nr/publications/bulletins/nrb30/nrb30_8.htm - National Register Bulletin 30 Guidelines for Evaluating and Documenting Rural Historic Landscapes for more information).

8. Component or Feature Description: If the form pertains to a particular component or feature of the overall site, please describe it here in full. Be as specific as possible concerning the component or feature function, and location within the overall site.
9. Historic Component Date(s) and/or Sociopolitical Period: Give date or range of dates of the historic component, being as specific as possible (e.g., 1810-1830, rather than the early 1800s). It may be appropriate to also reference the sociopolitical period (The Depression, The Civil War, etc.) corresponding to these dates here. Describe the criteria used to date the site (e.g., diagnostic artifacts, patent dates, map). Provide the citation for the source(s) where data was gathered.
10. Component Function(s): If possible, identify the original and present uses of the site, being as specific as possible. If the site has been abandoned, indicate that in present use. If a site has had multiple uses or has multiple components with different uses, please elaborate.
11. Ethnic Affiliation of Occupants: When known, indicate the ethnic affiliation of site occupants (e.g., Euroamerican, Hispanic, etc.). The preference is for “Historic” for generic historic cultural affiliation over “Euroamerican” (or its variants). Although “Historic” is not a culture it is recommended as a placeholder that demonstrates that consideration of culture has taken place. In cases where an ethnic affiliation has been identified though historical records or site elements, the culture should be identified by country of association such as Germany, other comparable ethnic identifier (such as Basque, Hispanic, or African American), or Native American group. Describe the criteria you used to determine affiliation (e.g., artifacts or architectural features, historic references, etc.)

12. Historic Boundary: Select boundaries that encompass the entire resource, with historic and contemporary additions. Include any surrounding land historically associated with the resource that retains its historic integrity and contributes to the property's historic significance.  The historic boundary may not match the legal property ownership.

For more information on historic boundaries, see:

http://www.historycolorado.org/sites/default/files/files/OAHP/Programs/SI_CameraClipboard24.pdf

13. N.R.H.P. Area of Significance: List the aspect of historic development in which this property made contributions for which it meets the National Register criteria, such as agriculture or politics/government. See http://www.nps.gov/nr/publications/bulletins/nrb16a/nrb16a_III.htm#statement for a listing of areas of significance. Provide the citation for the source(s) where data was gathered.


14. N.R.H.P. Period of Significance: List the span of time in which a property attained the significance for which it meets the National Register criteria. This could be a specific date or a date range. A property can have multiple periods of significance based on the appropriate areas of significance. If this is the case, list the multiple periods of significance. Provide the citation for the source(s) where data was gathered.

15. Theme: List the themes found in Appendix A of this document that pertain to the site.


16. Eligibility Support: If you are using this component form to document only a portion of the site, please check whether or not the portion you are recording supports the N.R.H.P. eligibility of the entire site. Justify your selection below. If you are using this component form to record the site in its entirety, check the N/A box.
17. Recorder(s): Enter the full name of the recorder(s). Do not use initials.
18. Date: Enter the last day that you were in the field. The date should be in a MM/DD/YYYY format.

19. Presence and Quantity of Artifacts: Use this table to denote what artifacts you are seeing, and how many. Note that many of the artifact types have dates associated with them. Use approximations for large quantities of artifacts. Use this information to help you fill out field 9 above.

20. Assemblage Size: Enter the total number of artifacts on the site, or check the appropriate estimated box.
21. Artifact Density: Check high, medium or low for artifact density. In description, indicate if there are differences in artifact distribution (e.g., heavy in some areas and light in other areas).
22. Unique Artifact Descriptions: List specific artifact types and the important attributes in the description field. The form contains prompts concerning the important descriptors for each artifact class. All of these items should be included in the counts of the Artifact table above in item 19 – Presence and Quantity of Artifacts. This gives you the opportunity to call attention to the really cool stuff.
For a detailed discussion of the different artifact classes and their important diagnostic characteristics, please see Appendix B, Historic Artifact Handbook, to these instructions. It will be very helpful to those inexperienced in recording historic archaeology sites and you are encouraged to consult it.
23. Standing structures: Indicate whether or not there are standing structures on the site. If there are, please complete an Architectural Inventory Form(s) (OAHP 1403) in addition to this form. If there is enough of the structure left to describe its architectural features (e.g., architectural style, number of stories, or presence of chimneys, doors, windows, etc.) you should also complete an Architectural Inventory Form(s).
If you complete an Architectural Inventory Form(s) please reference them here. You don't need to repeat any descriptive data that is redundant to the 1403 forms.

24. Features: List and describe each feature on the site. Be as specific as possible about function (e.g., is trash related to domestic or construction activities? Use cabin or barn vs. structure). In the case of trash scatters, artifacts should also be accounted for under the artifact section(s) of this form. The "Feature/Number Name" is a symbol or identification number referring to a feature on the sketch map.

For architectural features, include available information on construction material (e.g., wood, stone, etc.) and feature dimensions (preferably in feet and inches rather than metric). Include building footprint or groundplan here when it is discernible.
25. Archaeological Potential: Note whether or not there is the potential for archaeological deposits. If there is, describe the location and summarize the potential nature, depth, and research potential for those deposits. If it is unknown, document those areas that might have potential, which only further work would confirm.

Appendix A

List of Themes, Site Components and Features to consider when filling out the Historical Archaeological Component Form.


Theme

Subtheme


-Delineator
Historic Native American

(Named Native American Group)



Transportation

Trail


Road

Railroad


Water Control and Distribution

Dam


Head

Works


Canal

Ditch


Flume

Pipeline


Siphon
Communication

Telegraph

Telephone
Settlements

Household

Camp

Town


Company Town

Plaza


Rural Agriculture

Farming

Ranching

Industry

Fur and Hide Trade

Mining and Mineral Processing

-Stone Quarrying

-Cement


-Smelting

-Coal

-Uranium

-Placer Mining

-Precious Metals and Industrial Minerals Mining

Industry (cont.)

Timber


Food Processing

-Meat

-Dairying

-Sugar Beet

-Fresh Produce: Fruits and Vegetables

-Grains and Milling

-Canning and Bottling of Agricultural Produce

-Beverage

Oil and Gas

Oil Shale

Electrical Generation



-Water-powered

-Gas, Coal, or Nuclear-powered

-Wind-powered

-Solar

Steel and Iron

Chemical Manufacturing

Non-Metallic Mineral Products



-Brick

-Concrete and Cement

-Stone Finishing

-Cans, Bottles, and Stone Manufacture

Transportation and Freighting (e.g., automobile or wagon manufacturers or sites associated with freighting business)

Arms and Ammunition

Textile Working

Leather Products (e.g., saddle, harness, or clothing manufacture)

Rubber and Plastic Products

Other Specialized Manufacturing
Recreation

Outdoor


Government Managed

Health Resorts

Entertainment: Civic and Seedy

Social and Industrial (Corporate)

Developed Sport Auto and Railroad
Government

Exploration

Land Survey and Distribution

Indian Agencies

U.S. and State Military

Land Management

Public Works

Public Service

Transportation (for sites associated with government policy or funding)
Ethnicity (Use only as an adjunct to another theme or alone only if another theme cannot be identified)

Named ethnic group


Unknown

(May have subthemes associated with it)


Features

Adit

Air shaft

Artifact scatter (trash scatter, trash

dump)


Basement

Beacon


Berm

Bridle path

Bridle trail (use bridle path)

Cairn (purposeful stone marker)

Campfire ring (use hearth)

Campsite

Cemetery

Chute (log, ore)

Cinder pile

Construction debris (brick, stone,

lumber)

Cribbing



Depression

Drinking fountain

Dump

Farm equipment



Fence

Fire hearth (use hearth)

Fire pit (use hearth)

Fire ring (use hearth)

Fireplace

Flag pole

Foundation

Fur press

Game-hanging rack

Grave


Grave marker

Hearth


Hunting blind

Inscription (on tree or stone)

Marker

Mill tailings (use tailings)



Mine shaft

Outhouse hole

Oven (bread)

Path


Peeled tree

Penstock (pipeline used to transport water, usually under pressure)

Picnic table

Pipeline

Pit

Playing field



Pond

Pool (swimming, hot

springs)

Portal


Post (upright piece of wood, metal, or concrete)

Prospect hole (use prospect pit)

Prospect pit

Quarry


Ramp

Reservoir

Retaining wall

Rifle pit

Rock alignment

Rock art (without writing)

Rock pile (not cairn)

Sawdust pile

Sign

Slag pile


Soil stain (use surface stain)

Spring development

Stock tank

Stone circle

Stone quarry (use quarry)

Surface stain

Tailings

Tailings pile (use tailings)

Tent platform (use campsite)

Tent site (use campsite)

Tipi ring (use stone circle)

Tramway (aerial, cable,

funicular)

Trash disposal pit (use pit)

Trash dump (use artifact scatter or dump)

Trash scatter (use artifact scatter)

Tree art (without writing)

Trench


Tunnel (two open ends)

Vision quest

Walkway

Wall


Waste rock

Water fountain (use drinking fountain)

Water wheel

Well (lined hole or pipe)





Site Component or Feature Type


Administration building

Airfield


Airport

Amphitheater

Art gallery

Art studio

Assay office

Auto dealership

Auto showroom (use auto dealership)

Camp (CCC, construction, health, internment, logging, lumber, military, mining, mobilization, organization, stock, training)

Campfire circle (use amphitheater)

Campground (use camp)

Campsite (use camp)

Canal/Ditch

Cannery

Cantonment (use military camp)



Carriage works

Casino (use gambling hall)

Clubhouse

Coal washery

Coke oven

Communication building

Communication tower

Communication line

Community building

Company office (use office)

Country club

Creamery


Dairy

Dam


Depot (bus, railroad, freight)

Distillery

Ditch (use canal/ditch)

Dock (loading, boat)

Dormitory

Dude ranch

Elevator (grain or other product)

Entrance gate

Factory (munitions, sugar, other industries)

Fairground

Farm

Fire lookout



Fire watch tower (use fire lookout)

Fish hatchery

Fitness club (use health club)

Flume

Food locker (cold storage)

Fort (use fortification)

Fortification

Foundry (lead, steel, iron)

Fueling facility (usually use service station)

Gambling hall

Garden

Gas station (use service station)


Gazebo

Golf course

Grade (use railroad or road)

Grange hall (use community building)

Gristmill

Guard station

Gymnasium

Hall (concert, dance, dining, music, recreation)

Hangar

Health club



Highway (use road)

Homestead (if it represents acquisition from the public domain)

Hospital

Hotel


House (caddy, customs, opera, pump; for personal home use residence)

Infirmary (use hospital)

Kitchen (outdoor, community)

Landing strip (use airfield)

Laundry

Lodge (use resort)



Meat processing (use slaughterhouse)

Military base

Mill (ball, concentration, flour, hammer, planning, stamp, tube)

Mine (clay, coal, hard-rock, placer, precious metal)

Motel

Motor court (use motel)



Movie house (use theater)

Museum


Nursery

Observation tower

Office

Opium den



Ore loading facility

Overlook (use viewpoint)

Packing house (use packing plant)

Packing plant

Parade ground

Park (amusement, city, municipal, theme, national, state)

Patrol cabin

Pavilion


Penstock

Picnic area

Picnic ground (use picnic area)

Pier (use dock)

Pipeline

Plant (cement, chemical, crushing, packing, power, steam)

Playground

Playing field (usually use sports field)

Post office

POW camp (use prison)

Power line

Prison


Racecourse

Racetrack (use racecourse)

Radio tower (use communication tower)

Railroad

Ranch

Residence

Resort (fishing, health, hot springs, hunting, ski)

Restaurant

Road (toll, wagon, automobile)

Ruts (use trail or road)

Saloon

Sanatorium (use hospital)


Sawmill

School


Schoolhouse (use school)

Service station

Shaft house

Shelter (fisherman, ice skating, picnic, trail)

Signal station

Skating rink

Slaughterhouse

Smelter


Spa (use resort)

Splash dam (use dam)

Sports complex/facility

Sports field

Stadium (use sports complex)

Stage (use theater)

Stage stop

Station (check-in, comfort, entrance, ranger, toll)

Stock driveway

Stockade (use fortification)

Stockyard

Stone yard

Store

Target range



Tennis court

Terminal (usually use depot)

Theater

Town


Trading post

Trail (cattle, foot, interpretive, ski)

Viaduct (use bridge)

Viewpoint

Vineyard

Visitor’s center

Vista point (use viewpoint)

Water tower

Winery

Winter resort (use resort)




Architectural Features

Amphitheater

Animal pen

Arrastra

Assay Office

Bandstand

Barn (hay, dairy, horse, etc.)

Barracks

Bathhouse

Bin (ore, coal)

Blast furnace

Boarding house

Boat house boiler house

Bridge

Bunkhouse



Butcher shop

Cabin


Canal/ditch

Cattle pen (use animal pen)

Cellar (potato, root, cold storage)

Chicken coop

Chicken house (use chicken coop)

Church


Cistern

Clubhouse

Commercial building

Community building

Concentrating mill

Cookhouse

Corral

Crane (use derrick)



Dam

Derrick


Distillery

Ditch (use canal/ditch)

Dock dugout

Factory

Fire lookout

Flour mill

Flume

Fortification



Garage

Gazebo


Grade (use railroad, road)

Grain bin (use granary)

Grain elevator

Granary


Guard house

Head frame

Head gate

Head works

Hogan

Hoist house



Hospital

Ice house

Infirmary

Jail


Kiln (charcoal, line, brick, etc)

Kitchen (outdoor, community)

Latrine (use outhouse)

Laundry


Lean-to

Loading chute

Loading dock

Log cabin (use cabin)

Mess hall

Office


Ore bin

Ore mill


Outhouse

Powder house

Power plant

Privy (use outhouse)

Public building

Pump house

Railroad depot

Ramada


Refinery

Residence

Resort

Rock crusher



Room

Root cellar (use cellar)

Sawdust burner

Sawmill


School

Schoolhouse (use school)

Shaft house

Shed (general storage, hay, machinery, tack, coal, packing, etc.)

Shop (blacksmith, carpentry, craft, machine, printing, etc.)

Silo (cement, grain, missile)

Siphon

Slaughterhouse



Smelter

Smokehouse

Spring house

Stable


Still (use distillery)

Stockyard

Storage building (use shed)

Storehouse (use warehouse)

Supply house (use warehouse)

Sweat lodge

Tank (leaching, fuel, water, tipple)

Tram house

Tram terminal (use tram house)

Tree house

Tree platform

Trestle


Vat (chemical, treatment)

Wall

Warehouse

Water diversion (use dam or head gate)

Water tank

Water tower

Well (standing walls)

Wickiup


Windmill

Workshop (use shop)




Appendix B
Historic Artifact Handbook
by
Jonathon C. Horn

Alpine Archaeological Consultants, Inc.

PO Box 2075

Montrose, CO 81402


March 2005
The intent of this handbook is to provide site recorders with little or no background in historic artifact identification sufficient information so that they can provide consistent descriptive information about the artifacts and site features they are observing. Good description of observed features and artifacts is essential for functional and chronological determinations to be made, thereby insuring that sites or site components are evaluated for significance using the proper thematic context. Regardless of whether or not an individual has the expertise to interpret the evidence present at a particular site, anyone carrying out site recordation has the obligation and should have the ability to provide good descriptive information.

A large portion of this handbook is composed of illustrations. For the most part, these are self-explanatory and little text will be written to accompany them. Many artifacts will not be described whatsoever. A list of references is also provided. The focus of the handbook will be on commonly found artifacts that are particularly useful in providing dating information. Historic artifacts from the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries are particularly time sensitive, because of the rapid growth and change of technology. Using an assemblage of historic artifacts, it is not uncommon to be able to date a site to a 5 or 10-year time period. Functional interpretations can also be quite accurate using the artifacts alone. When coupled with well-directed historical research, the information that can be learned from a historic site can be very illuminating, not only from a historical perspective, but from anthropological, behavioral, technological, and socioeconomic viewpoints as well.
When classifying historic artifacts, the preferred method is by function. Classifying artifacts by material type makes functional interpretations very difficult and is inherently troublesome because many historic artifacts are composed of a variety of materials. A classificatory system for artifacts in museum collections was devised Robert G. Chenall (1978) and updated by Blackaby and Greeno (1988). This system is used by the National Park Service for their museum collections and works very well, especially when reference is made to Sprague (1981). Reuse of artifacts for purposes other than their original intention is very important data and should be recorded, but is problematic.



  1   2   3   4


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page