I. Instructions: Read the entire story to yourself making at least 5 marginal notes that help to bring clarity to the text. II. Marginal notes may consist of

:)


Download 24.08 Kb.
Date conversion27.05.2017
Size24.08 Kb.
Literature Circles: Vocabulary Searcher

I. Instructions: Read the entire story to yourself making at least 5 marginal notes that help to bring clarity to the text.
II. Marginal notes may consist of:

Ask a question where you are confused.

Wrap up an important point

Identify a main idea or concept

Clarify a part of the text

Circle a word and use context clues to identify its meaning

(These are just a few suggestions for marginal notes, but remember the point of them is to help you better comprehend the piece of literature.)
III. After reading:
Vocabulary Searcher: Delves for new and useful vocabulary and then guesses and identifies each words meaning.


  1. Highlight a list of at least 7 words that may be unfamiliar to you and the rest of the class within the text.




  1. Draw a chart to enter the information in, similar to the one below



Vocabulary Words

Context Clues that help you indentify the meaning of the word. OR What you think the word might mean from using context clues.

Part of Speech and definition of the word after using the dictionary.


1)







2)







3)







4)







5)







6)







7)









  1. Complete the chart thoroughly by entering each of the 7 words and the required information that it mentions above.


Literature Circles: Essential concept identifier
I. Instructions: Read the entire story to yourself making at least 5 marginal notes that help to bring clarity to the text.

II. Marginal notes may consist of:

Ask a question where you are confused.

Wrap up an important point

Identify a main idea or concept

Clarify a part of the text

Circle a word and use context clues to identify its meaning

(These are just a few suggestions for marginal notes, but remember the point of them is to help you better comprehend the piece of literature.)

III. After reading:
Essential concept identifier: Identifies four main concepts within the story: main idea, author’s purpose, and two themes.


  1. After reading the story, Identify three concepts within the text.

  • Main idea

  • Author’s Purpose

  • Two major themes presented within the story




  1. Write each of the essential concepts listed above, main idea, author’s purpose, and two major themes, in complete sentences. Make sure you give evidence to from the story to support your author’s purpose and your themes. (All of the essential concepts are related to one another, but focus on three different aspects or components of the story.

Here is a format to help you. Make sure you keep your work organized and “teacher friendly”


Main Idea: The main idea of the story is ………………..

Author’s Purpose: The author intended to……….………….the reader by……………….

This is evident in the story when………………………
Two major themes: The two major themes within the text are……………

This is revealed in the story when………….



Literature Circles: Executive Illustrator
I. Instructions: Read the entire story to yourself making at least 5 marginal notes that help to bring clarity to the text.

II. Marginal notes may consist of:

Ask a question where you are confused.

Wrap up an important point

Identify a main idea or concept

Clarify a part of the text

Circle a word and use context clues to identify its meaning

(These are just a few suggestions for marginal notes, but remember the point of them is to help you better comprehend the piece of literature.)

III. After reading:
Executive Illustrator:


  1. Summarize the text in two sentences. (Remember a summary must capture all of the main concepts in the text. No insignificant details are necessary in this two sentence summary.

  2. After your two sentence summary, create a new title for the text and write it underneath the two sentence summary.

  3. Underneath the summary and the new title, draw an illustration that summarizes or captures the main concepts of the text. (Be creative!)

(You may choose to do a cover page, a cartoon, or manifest the story through symbols that represent different aspects of the story. You have the freedom to draw whatever you want as long as it addresses the main concepts of the story.)




Literature Circles: Discussion Leader
I. Instructions: Read the entire story to yourself making at least 5 marginal notes that help to bring clarity to the text.
II. Marginal notes may consist of:

Ask a question where you are confused.

Wrap up an important point

Identify a main idea or concept

Clarify a part of the text

Circle a word and use context clues to identify its meaning

(These are just a few suggestions for marginal notes, but remember the point of them is to help you better comprehend the piece of literature.)
III. After reading:
Discussion Leader: Has much responsibility to keep the group on task and focus all discussions around the work. Only one person may speak at a time when prompted by the teacher to do so.

    1. Create 7 discussion questions focusing on the text. Questions should be varied in terms of difficulty. Not only will you create easy questions that do not require much thought, but you will also create “teacher like questions” that will make you and your classmates think more deeply about the text. Also, remember to ask clear and thorough questions and include correct punctuation (You will be graded on how effective your questions are in discussions)


    2. Create an answer key to the questions you asked on a separate sheet of paper. Therefore you will submit two papers, one with questions and one with answers.


Literature Circles: Comparison Analyzer
I. Instructions: Read the entire story to yourself making at least 5 marginal notes that help to bring clarity to the text.
II. Marginal notes may consist of:

Ask a question where you are confused.

Wrap up an important point

Identify a main idea or concept

Clarify a part of the text

Circle a word and use context clues to identify its meaning



(These are just a few suggestions for marginal notes, but remember the point of them is to help you better comprehend the piece of literature.)
III. After reading:
Comparison Analyzer:


  1. Create the chart below on a separate sheet of paper. Make sure it is large enough to fit all of the required information inside.

Arachne by Olivia Coolidge

(Choose another mythological story from this unit that we have read as a class and write it here along with the author’s name.)

Similarities of both stories:





2) Now you will complete the comparison and contrast chart focusing on the questions below.



  • In each section of the two column notes that contain the titles of each story, you are going to identify at least 5 differences within each story. Go beyond the obvious!

  • In the Similarities section, you are going to think about how each story is similar to the other. Here are a few guideline questions to keep you focused. You may go beyond these questions.


What did you learn from both stories and what themes do they have in common? Why do you think both stories exist in this unit together? What do both stories have to do with theme from this unit, choices? How can you apply both stories to your life?


:)


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page

:)