I’m a Princess, Too



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I’m a Princess, Too”

Once upon a time there was a little girl named Alex who believed she was a princess. She was known to one and all as Princess Alex; and as she is my great niece, I was honored to buy into her fantasy of being Her Royal Highness. Her family and friends can’t quite remember how she took on the title, but somewhere around the time she learned to talk she referred to herself that way. She then had expectations that she be treated like a princess, and it was easy for those people in her life to live up to her expectations, since she was such a sweet and beautiful little girl.

So her parents decorated her room like a castle; family members bought her clothes fit for a little princess. She had princess paraphernalia, and even a tiara for special occasions.
When she was 5 years old, I took Princess Alex to a downtown department store for Christmas story time with the Bearenstien Bears. That day, Alex was dressed in pink lace, with a white fur coat and a white fur muff, as any little princess should be.
Because we all know that bears cannot read, into the room walked a beautiful, young girl dressed as a princess, who would read the story. She referred to herself as Princess Anne. As Alex was in awe, she moved to the front of the room to get a closer look. She listened so intently to the story that her eyes never left the princess.
When Princess Anne finished reading, she announced that all of the children would be able to get their picture taken with the Bearenstien Bears, and that they should all form a line. As Alex and I waited, she turned to me and said, “Mannie, I don’t want my picture taken with the bears, I want it taken with the princess.” So I approached the photographer and I told him of Alex’s request. He said that he was sorry, but that he was to take pictures only of the children with the bears.
Alex slowly hung her head, looked a bit sad, but very intent. Then suddenly, she turned around, let go of my hand, and walked directly up to the Princess. She said, “Princess Anne, I would like to get my picture taken with you; after all I am a princess, too. I am Princess Alex.”

The young woman smiled at Alex as she said, “Princess Alex, I am so sorry I didn’t recognize you. Well, of course, you will have your picture taken with me.” And so she did.

I was reminded of some very good life lessons that day. Alex knew who she was. She was confident and happy with herself. She believed in herself and in her dreams. No one would deter her from her path. How many times have we let others dictate who we are? How many times have we let others lead us down their path because of our lack of confidence to proceed on our own life’s journey?
Alex needed help, she knew to ask for help. How often have we needed or wanted things and we have forgotten to ask for help?
Although Alex knew that I would do anything to make her happy, she quickly discovered that I was not the person with the ability to get her the help she needed. So she went to the Source. How many times when we finally ask for help, do we discover that those we have asked are not necessarily the Source of all we need?
Who is the Source of what you need in your life? For some of us it is friends and family, for some of us it is institutions of higher learning, business contacts, the community we live in. Or it is the Ultimate Source of all good things, a Higher Power.
If life isn’t giving you all that you want, maybe, like Princess Alex, you need to believe in yourself, step out of line, ask for help, and go to the Source. Imagine, then, what your life could be.

Mary Grace Musuneggi is the Senior Partner of The Musuneggi Financial Group, a financial consulting firm, and Executive Director of Single Steps Strategies, a life planning program for women. For more information on up coming workshops and events visit our websites at www.mfgplanners.com and www.SingleStepsStrategies.com .

February 4, 2008

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