In-depth Study Unit Topic or Title: Student Perspective of Indigenous Stories Essential Question(s)



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In-depth Study Unit Topic or Title: Student Perspective of Indigenous Stories


Essential Question(s): What is the difference between Northwest Coast and Northwest United States?

What is an Indigenous legend or story?



How can you tell a story by just looking at the pictures of a story?

Curriculum written by: Shawn D. Orr

Content area: Native American Studies – Language Arts

Grade level: 3

Summary of Outcomes: Students will be able to question themselves about a picture and write about it. They will learn how to be more descriptive in their writing by stretching sentences with adjectives, adverbs, and more lively verbs. The students will learn transition words for a story, so they are used appropriately for a specific part of the story. Students will then create their own story (legend) by just having the title and illustrations of the story. Students will peer edit and revise their stories to go along with the illustrations. They will then compare their story with the original.


Content Standards Addressed

Essential Understandings

And

Common Core Reading and Writing Standards

Long Term

Student Learning Targets

  • Content knowledge, reasoning and skills

  • Literacy skills: Reading, Writing, Speaking

  • Citizenship

Assessments

  • Possible sources of assessment information

  • Communication of understanding


  • Final tests and products

EU 1 – There is great diversity among the 12 tribal Nations of MT in the languages, cultures, histories, and governments. Each Nation has a distinct and unique cultural heritage that contributes to modern MT.

EU 3 – Each tribe has its own oral histories, which are as valid as written histories. These histories pre-date the “discovery” of North America.

EU 6 – History is a story most often related through the subjective experience of the teller. With the inclusion of more and varied voices, histories are being rediscovered and revised. History told from an Indian perspective frequently conflicts with the stories mainstream historians tell.

  1. I can compare the Northwest Coast, Plateau, Plains, and Great Basin Cultural Areas and the Northwest United States.

  • I can tell the differences between Cultural Areas and directional areas of the United States.

Admit/Exit Ticket

Map Synthesis

Self-Reflection


3.RL.2 – Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures (including those by and about American Indians); determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain hot it is conveyed through key details in the text.

3.RL.6 – Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters. Include works by and about American Indians.


3.RL.7 – Explain how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting)


  1. I can make my sentences more descriptive by using adjectives, adverbs, and lively verbs.

  • I can write a sentence describing what I see in a picture.

  • I can create a paragraph from my descriptive sentences.

Admit/Exit Ticket


3.RL.9 – Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same author, including American Indian authors, about the same or similar characters (e.g., in books from a series)

3.RI.2 – Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea

  1. I can create a part of an Indigenous story by looking at an illustration of the story.

  • I can closely observe an illustration to help me.

  • I can explain what Indigenous means.

Admit/Exit Ticket

Self-Reflection

Mad-lib Story


3.RI.6 – Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text.

3.RI.7 – Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur)


3.RI.8 – Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence)

3.W.3 – Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

3.W.3a – establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.

3.W.3b – use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings to develop experiences and events or show the response of characters to situations.

3.W.3c – use temporal words and phrases to signal event order.

3.W.3d – provide a sense of closure.

3.W.4 – With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose.

3.W.5 – With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.

3.L.1 – Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

3.L.1aexplain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in general and their functions in particular sentences.

3.L.1i – produce simple, compound, and complex sentences.

3.L.2 – Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.


3.L.2a – capitalize appropriate words in titles.

3.L.2e – use conventional spelling for high-frequency and other studied words and for adding suffixes to base words

3.L.2f – use spelling patterns and generalizations in writing words.

3.L.3 – Use knowledge of the language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

3.L.3a – choose words and phrases for effect.


  1. I can re-create an Indigenous story by just having the title and illustrations of the story.

  • I can revise my story with a peer to see how my transitions move along the story.

Group Share

Final Story

Peer-Editing

Self-Reflection










Sequence of scaffolding lessons

  • What sequence of steps will best engage, support and hold students accountable to reaching the above learning targets?

  • What student and teacher involved assessment for learning strategies and routines can you build in?

  • What instructional practices and protocols will you use?




  1. Cultural Areas vs. Directional Areas of United States

  • Admit – “How many Cultural Areas are in Northwestern United States?”
  • Think a-loud – What are differences of Cultural Area and directional area of United States.


  • Map Synthesis – Look at maps of Cultural Areas and United States and compare.

  • Self-Reflection – Opinion on similarities and differences between cultural area and directional areas




  1. Sentence Stretching and Sentence Combining

  • Admit – “What makes a good sentence?”

  • Think a-loud – Adjectives, Adverbs, and lively verbs

  • Photo Analysis – Look at photo of man telling story around fire.

  • Think a-loud – Teacher led sentence stretch

  1. The homes are round.

  • Small Group – Each group sentence stretch a basic sentence.

  1. The moon is in the sky.

  2. A man telling a story.

  3. There is a fire.

  4. People are sitting.

  • Group Share – read basic sentence and then share group stretched sentenced.

  • Group Edit – look for adjectives, adverbs, and lively verbs that were used.

  • Individual – now combine sentences to make sentences into a paragraph about the picture.

  • Exit – “What was easier, sentence stretching or sentence combining?” and “What worked well in the group and what didn’t work well in the group?”




  1. Mad-lib Indigenous Story

  • Admit – What are transitions of a story?”

  • Think a-loud – Discuss what time oriented transitions are.

  • Read a-loud - Read “Turtle who went to War”, a Lakota Story and have students write down all transitions they hear from story.

  • Word Wall – students share the transitions they heard in story
  • Illustration Observation – pass out pages from the story with only the illustration and page number from The Bear and the Deer, a Shoshone-Bannock story from Ft. Hall Indian Reservation. Students are to only look at their illustration.


  • Writing Workshop – students are to observe the page number and what is going on in the illustration and write their part of the story with transitions and description.

  • Group Share – Read students new story of The Bear and the Deer in order.

  • Think a-loud – opinions if it makes sense and the story flows well.

  • Discussion – writing to another person’s perspective (illustrations) of an Indigenous story

  • Read a-loud – read “The Bear and the Deer” to the class.

  • Reflection – what was easy/hard about this and why didn’t the story flow well when each student wrote a page to the story.




  1. Writing Indigenous story with only title and illustrations.

  • Read a-loud – read students mad-lib story of “The Bear and the Deer” and the Indigenous story of “The Bear and the Deer”

  • Writing Workshop – creating a full Indigenous story

  1. Pass out stories to students

  2. One student, one story

  3. Illustration observation before writing

  4. take notes for each page to revise for transitions and description

  • Pair/Share – edit for transitions and description

  • Revise stories

  • Self-Reflection on writing and perspectives




  1. Can then lead to looking and petroglyphs, pictographs, and winter counts

  • Trying to make sense of someone’s own perspective with only illustrations or pictures



Instructional Practices selected:
Inquiry

Admit Tickets

Think a-loud

Photo and Illustration Observations

Comprehension

Map Synthesis


Vocabulary Development

Editing for adjectives and adverbs

Transitions for time

Word Wall

Editing for Transitions
Oral Participation Protocols

Pair Share

Group Share
Represent-to-Learn


Write-to-learn

Exit Tickets

Writing Workshop: sentence stretching

Writing Workshop: Mad-lib Story

Writing Workshop: Re-telling Indigenous Story





Resources: (e.g. Anchor Texts, District adopted materials, Supplementary resources, Web-sites)



The Bear and the Deer”, Ft. Hall Indian Reservation, Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, 710 SW 2nd Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97204

The Bear Tepee”, Northern Cheyenne Tribe, Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, 710 SW 2nd Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97204

The Bob-tailed Coyote”, Northern Cheyenne Tribe, Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, 710 SW 2nd Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97204

Coyote and Bear”, Kootenai Culture Committee, Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, 710 SW 2nd Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97204

Coyote and Trout”, Kootenai Culture Committee, Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, 710 SW 2nd Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97204

Chipmunk Meets Old Witch”, Warms Springs Committee, Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, 710 SW 2nd Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97204

The Crow”, Assiniboine, Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, 710 SW 2nd Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97204

How Marten Got His Spots”, Kootenai Culture Committee, Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, 710 SW 2nd Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97204

How Wildcat and Coyote Tricked each Other”, Ft. Hall Indian Reservation, Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, 710 SW 2nd Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97204

Inkdomi and the Buffalo”, Assiniboine, Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, 710 SW 2nd Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97204

Insects off to War”, Northern Cheyenne Tribe, Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, 710 SW 2nd Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97204

Lost in the Fog”, Coastal Planning Committee - Clallam, Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, 710 SW 2nd Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97204

Napi and the Bullberries”, Blackfeet Tribe, Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, 710 SW 2nd Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97204


Maps, On Classroom Walls

Raccoon’s Black Eyes and Ringed Tail”, Ft. Hall Indian Reservation, Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, 710 SW 2nd Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97204

Raven Helps the Indians”, Coastal Planning Committee – Skokomish, Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, 710 SW 2nd Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97204

Why Bluejay Hops”, Coastal Planning Committee – Skokomish, Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, 710 SW 2nd Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97204



Why Codfish Has a Red Face”, Coastal Planning Committee – Skokomish, Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, 710 SW 2nd Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97204



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