In Search of Unification Varieties of Monism in 19th Century Germany



Download 152.09 Kb.
Page3/4
Date conversion18.07.2018
Size152.09 Kb.
1   2   3   4

VII. Summary

The Darwin-reception is a particularly conspicuous example of how a scientist’s and a theory’s view in public and in science can be constructed by its recipients. This can have an important, at times devastating impact on social, political and ethical interpretations as it is manifested in what is called Social Darwinism.

Since Haeckel, Büchner, Vogt, Rolle and others wrote in the name of Darwin and were also well known abroad, people could gain the impression that this was Darwin’s position. But the Darwin-reception took place through the writings of Darwin’s German popularizers, whose writings were translated into the languages of the respective countries. One can talk of a double or even manifold reception here: Bronn translated Darwin’s Origin, and the readers of Bronn’s translations wrote their own story of what they thought evolution including human evolution looked like on the basis of the knowledge they had of the translated Darwin. These writings were translated into different languages. Haeckel, Büchner, Rolle and Bölsche were translated into Swedish or Finish and “what was called Darwinism in Finland was strongly influenced by Haeckelism.” (Leikola 2008, 145)32. Also in Spain, one “route for the intellectual reception of evolutionism” was through the influence of German evolutionary views. “The evolutionist current was also diffused through translations of articles promoting materialist naturalism”, especially by Büchner, Vogt and Haeckel. “The latter reflected even better than Darwin the focus of Spanish evolutionists on a conception of nature that excluded supernatural explanations.” (Pelayo 2008, 388).

In Poland the situation was similar. Darwin was “viewed through the prism of his exegetes”. And “the distinction between Darwin’s ideas and their exegesis proposed by various self-proclaimed Darwinists is often fairly hazy, to say the least. One may even venture to say that, to Polish intellectuals, reading ‘Darwin’s bulldogs’ was more interesting than reading the naturalist himself.” (Schümann 2008, 253). Daniel Schümann talks of an “equational fallacy”, meaning “the uncritical identification of Darwin’s ideas with Haeckels’s hypotheses, which most Polish Positivists were guilty of.” (Schümann 2008, 255). The same is true for the identification of Darwin’s ideas with Herbert Spencer’s. Catchphrases like “struggle for existence” got a political meaning. They were often extracted out of the context of Darwin’s work from those who supported the development of social Darwinism.

Also in the Netherlands Bücher, Vogt and Haeckel were influential. When Vogt visited the Netherlands in 1868, “his lectures on the descent of man in Rotterdam proved inflammatory, causing radicalization in the popular press as well as in the more serious journals. On the one hand orthodox Christians started to stigmatize Darwin’s theory as a dangerous new ‘ism’, lumping it together with materialism and atheism. On the other hand freethinkers […] felt the need to defend and propagate the newborn Darwinism as a superior substitute for an outdated Christian world view. In the 1860s Darwin’s theory could best be described as a time bomb […] but it did not explode until Vogt’s visit in 1868.” (Leeuwenburgh, van der Heide 2008, 187).

In France Vogt “popularized a militant atheist version of transformism, but completely ignored the content of Darwin’s anthropology, even though he wrote the preface to the French translation of the Descent.” (Tort 2008, 334f.).


It is important to realize that all these positions were formulated drawing in a very general way on Darwin’s theory whereas Darwin himself had not written anything like this in his Origin of Species. His Descent on Man was published in 1871, much later than most of these works just presented. Perhaps we can even dare to presume that he was influenced in some of his utterances by these authors rather than the other way around. Darwin was the recipient of a reception that had started drawing on his name. But it must also be considered that there was already a general willingness or even strong tendency towards a Eurocentric perspective, a constellation which could easily lead to such racist descriptions. Darwin was however no biological racist. He even questioned the possibility of specifying scientific criteria for determining human races.


References
Anon (1864): „Die Darwin’sche Lehre und die Sprachwissenschaft“, Das Ausland. Vol. 37/17, pp. 397-399.
Backenköhler, Dirk (2008): „Only ‚Dreams from an Afternoon Nap’? Darwin’s Theory of Evolution and the Foundation of Biological Anthropology in Germany 1860-75”, in: Engels, Eve-Marie, Glick, Thomas F. (eds.): The Reception of Charles Darwin in Europe. London, New York: Continuum, pp. 98-115. Shortened transl. and slightly rev. “Alles nur >>Träume eines Mittagsschläfchens<Charles Darwin und seine Wirkung. Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, pp. 111-138.

Bayertz, Kurt (1998): „Darwinismus als Politik. Zur Genese des Sozialdarwinismus in Deutschland 1860-1900“, in: Stapfia 56 (zugl. Kataloge des OÖ Landesmuseums, Neue Folge Nr. 131, pp. 229-288.

–, (2009): „Sozialdarwinismus in Deutschland 1860-1900“ in: Eve-Marie Engels (ed.): Charles Darwin und seine Wirkung. Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, pp. 178-202.
Bronn, Heinrich Georg (1860): „Ch. Darwin: on the Origin of Species by means of Natural Selection, or the preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life (502 pp. 80, London 1859).”, Neues Jahrbuch für Mineralogie, Geognosie, Geologie und Petrefaktenkunde. pp. 112-116.; English translation in: David L. Hull (ed.) (1973): Darwin and his Critics. Chicago, London: University of Chicago Press, pp. 120-124. (1860a)
–, (1860): „Schlusswort des Übersetzers“, in: Charles Darwin, über die Entstehung der Arten im Thier- und Pflanzen-Reich durch natürliche Züchtung, oder Erhaltung der vervollkommneten Rassen im Kampfe um’s Daseyn. Stuttgart: F. Schweizerbart’sche Verlagshandlung und Druckerei. (1860b)
–, (1860): „Prospectus“ 4 pages, originally added to Darwin, Charles (1860): Über die Entstehung der Arten im Thier- und Pflanzen-Reich durch natürliche Züchtung, oder Erhaltung der vervollkommneten Rassen im Kampfe um’s Daseyn. Stuttgart: F. Schweizerbart’sche Verlagshandlung und Druckerei. Translated by H. G. Bronn after the 2nd English edition. (1860c)
Büchner, Ludwig (1855): Kraft und Stoff. Empirisch-naturphilosophische Studien. Frankfurt am Main: Meidinger Sohn & Comp.

Büchner, Ludwig (1860): „Eine neue Schöpfungstheorie“, in: Stimmen der Zeit. Monatsschrift für Politik und Literatur. Vol 2, pp. 356-360.

–, (1861): „Das Schlachtfeld der Natur und der Kampf ums Dasein“, in: Die Gartenlaube. Illustriertes Familienblatt. pp. 93-95.
–, (1868): Sechs Vorlesungen über die Darwin’sche Theorie von der Verwandlung der Arten und die erste Entstehung der Organismenwelt, sowie über die Anwendung der Umwandlungslehre auf den Menschen, das Verhältniß dieser Theorie zur Lehre vom Fortschritt und den Zusammenhang derselben mit der materialistischen Philosophie der Vergangenheit und Gegenwart. Leipzig: Verlag von Theodor Thomas.

Burkhardt, Frederick, Smith, Sydney et al. (eds.), The Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, Vol. 1, 1985- Vol 17, 2009, more following. Quoted as CCD.


Cohen, Robert S., Schnelle, Thomas (eds.) (1986): Cognition and fact. Materials on Ludwik Fleck. Dordrecht, Holland; Kluwer Academic Press.

Darwin, Charles (1859): On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life, London: John Murray 1964, Reprint of 1859, Cambridge, Mass, London, England: The Balknap Press of Harvard University Press, Introd. by Ernst Mayr.


–, (1860): On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life, 2nd ed. London: John Murray (11859). (1860a)

–, (1860): Über die Entstehung der Arten im Thier- und Pflanzen-Reich durch natürliche Züchtung, oder Erhaltung der vervollkommneten Rassen im Kampfe um’s Daseyn. Nach der zweiten Auflage mit einer geschichtlichen Vorrede und andern Zusätzen des Verfassers für diese deutsche Ausgabe aus dem Englischen übersetzt und mit Anmerkungen versehen. Stuttgart: F. Schweizerbart’sche Verlagshandlung und Druckerei. Translated by H. G. Bronn after the 2nd English edition. Reprint Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft. 2008, ed. and with introd. By Thomas Junker. (1860b)

–, (1861): On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life, 3rd ed., with add. And corr. London: John Murray (11859).
–, (1969): The Autobiography of Charles Darwin 1809-1882. With original omissions restored. Ed. by Nora Barlow. New York, London: W. W. Norton & Company (11958).
–, (1989): The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex. (11871) 2nd ed. (1874), revised and augmented 1877. 2 Vols. P. H. Barrett, R. B. Freeman (eds.): The Works of Charles Darwin, Vols. 21, 22. London 1989.
Daum, Andreas (1998): Wissenschaftspopularisierung im 19. Jahrhundert. Bürgerliche Kultur, naturwissenschaftliche Bildung und die deutsche Öffentlichkeit 1848-1914. München: R. Oldenbourg Verlag.

Di Gregorio, Mario (2008): “Under Darwin‘s Banner: Ernst Haeckel, Carl Gegenbaur and Evolutionary Morphology”, in: Engels, Eve-Marie, Glick, Thomas F. (eds.): The Reception of Charles Darwin in Europe. London, New York: Continuum, pp. 79-97. Transl. and shortened: “Unter Darwins Flagge: Ernst Haeckel, Carl Gegenbaur und die Evolutionäre Anthropologie”, in: Eve-Marie Engels (ed.): Charles Darwin und seine Wirkung. Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, pp. 80-110.

Engels, Eve-Marie (ed.) (1995): Die Rezeption von Evolutionstheorien im 19. Jahrhundert. Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp. (quoted as 1995a)

 (1995): „Biologische Ideen von Evolution im 19. Jahrhundert und ihre Leitfunktionen“, in: Engels, Eve-Marie (ed.) (1995): Die Rezeption von Evolutionstheorien im 19. Jahrhundert. Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, S. 13-66. (quoted as 1995b)
 (2000): „Charles Darwin in der deutschen Zeitschriftenliteratur des 19. Jahrhunderts – Ein Forschungsbericht“, in: Brömer, Rainer, Hoßfeld, Uwe und Rupke, Nicolaas A. (eds.): Evolutionsbiologie von Darwin bis heute. Berlin: Verlag für Wissenschaft und Bildung, pp. 19-57.
 (2006): „Charles Darwin’s moral sense. On Darwin’s Ethics of Non-Violence“, in: Deutsche Gesellschaft für Geschichte und Theorie der Biologie (Hrsg.): Annals of the History and Philosophy of Biology 10/2005, Göttingen: Universitätsverlag, pp. 31-54.
 (2007): Charles Darwin. München: C. H. Beck.
 (2008): „Darwin’s Philosophical Revolution: Evolutionary Naturalism and First Reactions to his Theory”, in: Engels, Eve-Marie, Glick, Thomas F. (eds.) (2008): The Reception of Charles Darwin in Europe. London, New York: Continuum, pp. 23-53.
Engels, Eve-Marie, Glick, Thomas F. (eds.) (2008): The Reception of Charles Darwin in Europe. London, New York: Continuum.
 (2008): „Editors’ Introduction“, in: Engels, Eve-Marie, Glick, Thomas F. (eds.) (2008): The Reception of Charles Darwin in Europe. London, New York: Continuum, pp. 1-22.

 „The First German Reviews of Darwin’s Origin of Species and the Significance of the First German Translation by Heinrich Georg Bronn for the Reception of Darwin’s Theory”, in: Glick, Thomas F., Shaffer, Elinor (eds.): The Reception of Charles Darwin in Europe. (Working Title) Conference at Christ’s College, Cambridge, 26 February 2009. Forthcoming 2009/2010.

Fleck, Ludwik (1980): Die Entstehung und Entwicklung einer wissenschaftlichen Tatsache. Lothar Schäfer, Thomas Schnelle (eds.), Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp (1st ed. 1935).
 (1983): Erfahrung und Tatsache. Lothar Schäfer, Thomas Schnelle (eds.), Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp.
Foerster, Wilhelm (1892): Die Begründung einer Gesellschaft für ethische Kultur. Einleitungs-Rede gehalten am 18. October 1892 zu Berlin. Berlin: Ferd. Dümmlers Verlagsbuchhandlung.
 (1903): Die ethische Bewegung in Deutschland am Schluss ihres ersten Jahrzehnts und gegenüber der jetzigen Weltlage. Berlin: Verlag für ethische Kultur.
Frohschammer, Jakob (1862): „Ueber Ch. Darwin’s Theorie von der Entstehung der Arten im Thier- und Pflanzenreiche“, Athenäum. Philosophische Zeitschrift. Vol. 1, 439-530.
Gegenbaur, Carl (1870): Grundzüge der vergleichenden Anatomie. 2nd re. ed. Leipzig: Wilhelm Engelmann (1st. 1859).
Gliboff, Sander (2008): H. G. Bronn, Ernst Haeckel, and the Origins of German Darwinism. A Study in Translation and Transformation. Cambridge, Massachusetts, London, England: The MIT Press.
Haeckel, Ernst (1862): Die Radiolarien. (Rhizopoda Radiaria.). Berlin: Georg Reiner.
 (1863): „Über die Entwicklungstheorie Darwins“, in: Gemeinverständliche Werke. Vol. V. Leipzig: Kröner, Berlin: Carl Henschel 1924, pp. 3-32. (1924a).

 (1866): Generelle Morphologie der Organismen. Allgemeine Grundzüge der organischen Formen-Wissenschaft, mechanisch begründet durch die von Charles Darwin reformirte Descendenz-Theorie 2 Vols. Berlin: Georg Reimer.

 (1868): Natürliche Schöpfungsgeschichte. Gemeinverständliche wissenschaftliche Vorträge über die Entwickelungslehre im Allgemeinen und diejenige von Darwin, Goethe und Lamarck im Besonderen, über die Anwendung derselben auf den Ursprung des Menschen und andere damit zusammenhängende Grundfragen der Naturwissenschaft. Berlin: Georg Reimer.
 (1877): „Über die heutige Entwicklungslehre im Verhältnisse zur Gesamtwissenschaft“, in: Gemeinverständliche Werke. Vol. V. Leipzig: Kröner, Berlin: Carl Henschel 1924, pp. 143-161. (1924b).
 (1878): „Freie Wissenschaft und freie Lehre“, in: Gemeinverständliche Werke. Vol. V. Leipzig: Kröner, Berlin: Carl Henschel 1924, pp. 196-290. (1924c).
 (1899): Die Welträtsel. Gemeinverständlich Studien über monistische Philosophie. Vol. III. Leipzig: Kröner, Berlin: Carl Henschel 1924. (1924d).
 (1904): Die Lebenswunder. Gemeinverständliche Werke. Vol. V. Leipzig: Kröner, Berlin: Carl Henschel 1924. (1924e).
Harvey, Joy (2008): “Darwin in a French Dress: Translating, Publishing and Supporting Darwin in Nineteenth-Century France”, in: Engels, Eve-Marie, Glick, Thomas F. (eds.): The Reception of Charles Darwin in Europe. London, New York: Continuum, pp. 354-374.
Helmholtz, Hermann von (1869): „Über das Ziel und die Fortschritte der Naturwissenschaft“, in: Das Denken in der Naturwissenschaft. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft 1968, pp. 31-61.

Hilgendorf, Franz (1866): Planorbis multiformis im Steinheimer Süßwasserkalk. Ein Beispiel für Gestaltveränderung im Laufe der Zeit. Berlin: W. Weber.

Jahn, Ilse (2001): Matthias Jacob Schleiden (1804-1881), in: Jahn, Ilse, Schmitt, Michael (eds.): Darwin & Co. Vol. I, München: C.H. Beck, 311-331.

Jahn, Ilse, Schmidt, Isolde (2005): Matthias Jacob Schleiden (1804-1881). Sein Leben in Selbstzeugnissen. Acta Historica Leopoldina. No. 44. Deutsche Akademie der Naturforscher Leopoldina, Halle (Saale), Halle: Druckhaus Schütze.


Junker, Thomas (1989): Darwinismus und Botanik. Rezeption, Kritik und theoretische Alternativen im Deutschland des 19. Jahrhunderts. Stuttgart: Deutscher Apotheker Verlag.
 (1991): „Heinrich Georg Bronn und die Entstehung der Arten“, in: Sudhoffs Archiv. Vol. 75/2, pp. 180-208.
Krauße, Erika (1984): Ernst Haeckel. Leipzig: Teubner Verlagsgesellschaft.
Meyer, Jürgen Bona (1861): „Ueber die Stufen der Vollkommenheit unter den organischen Wesen“, Amtlicher Bericht der 35. Versammlung deutscher Naturforscher und Ärzte (Königsberg 1860), pp. 43-49.
– (1866): „Der Darwinismus“, Preußische Jahrbücher. Vol. 17, pp. 272-302, 404-453.
– (1870): Philosophische Zeitfragen. Populäre Aufsätze. Bonn: Adolph Marcus.

Müller, Fritz (1864): Für Darwin. Leipzig: Wilhelm Engelmann. Engl. translation: Facts and Arguments for Darwin. London: John Murray 1869.

Preyer, William (1869): Der Kampf um das Dasein. Ein populärer Vortrag. Bonn: Eduard Weber's Buchhandlung.
Reif, Wolf-Ernst (1983): „Hilgendorf’s (1863) dissertation on the Steinheim planorbids (Gastropoda; Miocene): The development of a phylogenetic research program for Paleontology“, Paläontologische Zeitschrift. Vol. 57, pp. 7-20
Rolle, Friedrich (1863): Ch. Darwin’s Lehre von der Entstehung der Arten im Pflanzen- und Thierreich in ihrer Anwendung auf die Schöpfungsgeschichte. Frankfurt am Main: Joh. Christ. Hermann’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung.

– (1866): Der Mensch, seine Abstammung und Gesittung, im Lichte der Darwin’schen Lehre von der Art-Entstehung und auf Grundlage der neuern geologischen Entdeckung dargestellt. Frankfurt: Joh. Schrist. Hermann’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung.


Sachs, Julius (1868) Lehrbuch der Botanik nach dem gegenwärtigen Stand der Wissenschaften bearbeitet. Leipzig: Wilhelm Engelmann.
Sandmann, Jürgen (1990): Der Bruch mit der humanitären Tradition. Die Biologisierung der Ethik bei Ernst Haeckel und anderen Darwinisten seiner Zeit. Stuttgart, New York: Gustav Fischer.
Schleicher, August (1863): Die Darwinsche Theorie und die Sprachwissenschaft. Offenes Sendschreiben an Herrn Dr. Ernst Haeckel […]. Weimar: Hermann Böhlau.

Schleiden, Matthias Jakob (1863): Das Alter des Menschengeschlechts, die Entstehung der Arten und die Stellung des Menschen in der Natur. Leipzig: Wilhelm Engelmann.

Uschmann, Georg (1972): „August Schleicher und Ernst Haeckel“, in: Spitzbardt, Harry (ed.): Synchronischer und diachronischer Sprachvergleich. Jena: Friedrich Schiller Universität.

Vogt, Carl (1863): Vorlesungen über den Menschen seine Stellung in der Schöpfung und in der Geschichte der Erde. Gießen: Ricker’sche Buchhandlung.
Wagner, Rudolph (1860): „An Essay on Classification by Louis Agassiz. 1859“, Göttingische Gelehrten Anzeigen. Pp. 761-800 (also as separate printing) under the title: Louis Agassiz’s Prinzipien der Classifikation der organischen Körper insbesondere der Thiere mit Rücksicht auf Darwin’s Ansichten im Auszuge dargestellt und besprochen. Separat=Abdruck aus den Göttingischen Gelehrten Anzeigen. Göttingen: Verlag der Dieterischchen Buchhandlung.
Wallace, Alfred Russell (1894): “Menschliche Auslese”, in: Die Zukunft. Vol. 8, pp. 10-24.


1 For this last aspect see Daum 1998.

2 If not stated otherwise the translations of German texts into English are mine. This and the next section of my paper grew out of my previous work on Darwin and his reception as well as the presentations “Varieties of the Early Reception of Charles Darwin in Germany” at the “Colloquium on Charles Darwin in Europe”, Christ’s College, Cambridge, 26 February 2009 (Engels 2009/10 forthcoming), and “The Reception and Construction of Charles Darwin in 19th Century Germany” at the Boston Colloquium for Philosophy of Science, 3-4 April 2009, Boston, USA. I thank Thomas F. Glick and Elinior Shaffer for their thoughtful reading of parts of section II and their helpful advise.


3 “Es sind neue Gesichtspunkte, unter welchen ein gediegener Naturforscher in geistreicher und scharfsinniger Weise alte Thatsachen betrachtet, die er seit zwanzig Jahren gesammelt und gesichtet, über die er seit zwanzig Jahren unablässig gesonnen und gebrütet hat.“ (Bronn 1860b, 495).


4 „Aber sie leitet uns auf den einzigen möglichen Weg! Es ist vielleicht das befruchtete Ei, woraus sich die Wahrheit allmählich entwickeln wird; es ist vielleicht die Puppe, aus der sich das längst gesuchte Natur-Gesetz entfalten wird, […] Oder wir haben das gesuchte Gesetz vielleicht bereits vor Augen, aber sehen es nur durch ein Kaleidoskop, dessen Facettirung wir erst studiren oder abschleifen müssen, um das Objekt nach seiner wahren Beschaffenheit beurtheilen zu können?“ (Bronn 1860b, 518). Translation up to “kaleidoskope” after Sander Gliboff, 2008, 130).

5 „Die Möglichkeit nach dieser Theorie alle Erscheinungen in der organischen Natur durch einen einzigen Gedanken zu verbinden, aus einem einzigen Gesichtspunkt zu betrachten, aus einer einzigen Ursache abzuleiten, eine Menge bisher vereinzelt gestandener Thatsachen den übrigen auf’s innigste anzuschliessen und als nothwendige Ergänzungen derselben darzulegen, die meisten Probleme auf’s Schlagendste zu erklären, ohne sie in Bezug auf die andern als unmöglich zu erweisen, geben ihr einen Stempel der Wahrheit und berechtigen zur Erwartung auch die für diese Theorie noch vorhandenen grossen Schwierigkeiten endlich zu überwinden. Diese glänzenden Leistungen der Theorie (ihre Wahrheit einmal zugestanden) sind es, die uns so mächtig zu ihr hinziehen, wie sehr wir auch des Wankens ihrer Grundlage uns bewusst sind.“ (Bronn 1860b, 518; emphasis by E.-M.E.) English quotation up to ‘at last’ after S. Gliboff, who here * translates “explains away”. I dropped “away”.

6 „Nur aus dem Widerstreite der Meinungen wird die Wahrheit hervorgehen und der Urheber dieser Theorie selbst zweifelsohne noch die grosse Bedeutung erleben, der Naturforschung einen neuen Weg geöffnet zu haben.“ (Bronn 1860b, 520) English quotation after S. Gliboff.


7 “Wir können mit voller Überzeugung aussprechen, dass seit Lyells Principles of Geology (deren Fortsetzung es gleichsam bildet) kein Werk erschienen ist, das, was immer der endliche Erfolg der Theorie an sich seyn möge, eine solche Umgestaltung der gesammten naturhistorischen Wissenschaft erwarten liess, wie das gegenwärtige. Wir können mit voller Überzeugung sagen, dass der Botaniker, der Zoologe, der Paläontologe, der Physiologe, der Geologe und der Philosoph, der sich nicht mit den in diesem Buch niedergelegten Thatsachen und neuen Gesichtspunkten vertraut gemacht hat, wenigstens in so ferne nicht mehr auf der Höhe seiner Wissenschaft stehe, als er eine Reihe der wesentlichsten Ausgangspunkte ihrer weitren Entwickelung nicht kennt.“ (Bronn 1860c) This Prospectus is not contained in all editions. I discovered an incomplete version in the internet and thank Dirk Backenköhler for having provided a copy of the whole Prospectus.

8 For a more detailed discussion see Engels forthcoming 2009/2010.

9 I am here describing Darwin’s thinking in the terminology of the Polish-Jewish microbiologist and philosopher of science Ludwik Fleck (Fleck 1980, 1983), Cohen, Schnelle 1986.

10 As an instructive overview of the different varieties of social Darwinism in Germany see Bayertz 2009, or (longer version) Bayertz 1998.

11 „Der englische Botaniker Hooker, welcher unmittelbar nach Darwin ein Buch über die Flora von Australien erscheinen ließ, in dem die Darwin’schen Grundsätze auf die Botanik angewendet sind, führt diesen letzteren Gedanken mit Bezug auf den Menschen aus und zeigt, wie die jüngsten und daher am Besten angepassten Menschen=Rassen,



1   2   3   4


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page