Instructions for libraries: This kit is for home or home daycare use. You will need to provide the following items



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Instructions for libraries:

This kit is for home or home daycare use. You will need to provide the following items:


  1. A copy of How Do Dinosaurs Eat Their Food by Jane Yolen

  2. A second book about manners – or a list of books from your collection. Some suggestions are Excuse Me: A Little Book of Manners by Karen Katz; Monster Manners by Bethany Roberts; This Little Piggy’s Book of Manners by Kathryn Madeline Allen; or Perfect Pigs: An Introduction to Manners by Marc Brown.

  3. A print-out of the storytime plan (7 pages). You may edit this to suit your needs.

  4. A copy (color preferred) of the “Artwork for you to use” page (page 9 of this document). This page will need to be replaced each time the kit is checked out.

  5. Table setting props – plate, cup, knife, fork and spoon. You might use die cut shapes or paper plates and plastic tableware with velcro attached for flannelboard use.

  6. The flannelboard pieces at the end of this document (after the “Artwork you can use” page. You might want to laminate these pieces. Attach velcro or felt backing. (You can use a glue stick to attach felt to the back of pieces either before or after cutting them out.)

  7. The final page is a handout for parents of daycare children describing what the children learned. (Daycare providers should photocopy this page to send home with parents.)

  8. Optional: a small flannelboard (cardboard covered with felt).

“Little Miss – or Mister – Manners”

Family Storytime Kit

You will need:



  • A copy of How Do Dinosaurs Eat Their Food? by Jane Yolen
  • Another book about manners such as Excuse Me: A Little Book of Manners by Karen Katz; Monster Manners by Bethany Roberts; This Little Piggy’s Book of Manners by Kathryn Madeline Allen; Perfect Pigs: An Introduction to Manners by Marc Brown.


  • Flannel board. You can make a simple flannel board by covering a piece of cardboard with felt. [You can simply hold this in your lap for use with 2 or 3 children.] Fleece blankets also make a good flannel board substitute – simply drape one over the back of a sofa or chair.

This storytime talks about manners and emphasizes the early literacy skill of “Letter Knowledge.” Any activities that put things in a particular order or pick out small differences will build skills needed for reading. Your storytime will go more smoothly if you read through the rhymes a few times before you sit down with your child/children. Be flexible, too. You may want to read a book twice or repeat rhymes – let your child’s interests guide you.

The general outline of the storytime is:


  1. Quieting rhyme

  2. Book

  3. Activity

  4. Book

  5. Rhyme

  6. Rhyme (optional)

  7. Craft or follow-up activity (may be done right away or later on)


-1-


Quieting Rhyme


Say this rhyme together to get settled for reading. Explain to the child/children that you are using up some wiggles to help you sit still for storytime. You might hold up the letter W and explain that “wiggle” begins with the letter W – the “wuh” sound. You may want to say the rhyme twice.
I wiggle my fingers,

I wiggle my toes.

I wiggle my arms,

I wiggle my nose.

I think that the wiggles

Are all out of me

Now I can sit down

And hear a story.


OR . . .

You may want to make a wiggle jar/box/can/basket and use the rhyme below. Just give each child 5 “wiggles” to place in the container – these could be gummy worms, paper worms, packing worms, etc. Explain that they are going to put their wiggles in a jar until storytime is over. Then they may have them back. The “artwork” page of this kit provides worms you can cut out and lettering you can use to decorate your “Wiggle Holder.” Hold up the letter W and point out that “wiggle” and “worm” both begin with the sound of W (“wuh”).



-2-
5 little wiggles

I just can’t ignore,

I put one in the jar (or can, box, basket)

And now I have 4


4 little wiggles

Inside of me

I put one in the jar

And now I have 3


3 little wiggles

Don’t know what to do

So I put one in the jar

And now I have 2


2 little wiggles

Now I’m almost done

I put another in the jar

And now I have 1


1 little wiggle

All alone

I put it in the jar

And now I have none


Read How Do Dinosaurs Eat Their Food?

[If your child/children are big dinosaur fans, you my want to go through the book again pointing out the names of the dinosaurs hidden near each one. Run your finger under the letters as you say them. Then clap out the name to help your child hear each syllable – for example, “pro-to-cer-a-tops” has 5 claps. Have your child try repeating the name with you – this is good practice for pronouncing longer words.]
Activity

Play “Set the Table” with the flannelboard pieces and this rhyme (to the tune of “Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush.” This activity is really about putting things in a particular order):

This is the place we put our spoon,


Put our spoon, put our spoon,
This is the place we put our spoon,
When we set the table.

This is the place we put our cup,


Put our cup, put our cup,
This is the place we put our cup,
When we set the table.

S. Gruber


Continue with “knife,’ “fork,” and “plate” if the children seem to be enjoying the game.


Book

Read the other book about manners.
-4-

Rhyme

This is an updated version of a nursery rhyme that you may remember. Use the flannelboard pieces provided (snack, juice, king, toys, “PLEASE,” and “THANK YOU”) and point to each one as it is mentioned in the rhyme. You many need to explain that “playthings” is just another word for “toys.”
Old King Cole was a merry old soul

And a merry old soul was he

He called for his juice

And he called for his snack

And he called for his playthings three
Now,

Old King Cole was a merry old soul

‘Cause he had good manners like you

When he called for his juice

And he called for his snack

He remembered to say “please,” too.


So,

Old King Cole was a merry old soul

And his servants were never blue

When they brought him his juice

And they brought him his snack

He remembered to say “thank you.”


S. Gruber
Rhyme

This is an extra rhyme – skip it if the children are tired of sitting or come back to it later in the day. You can use some of the same flannelboard pieces that you used with “Old King Cole.”
There is a magic word I say

When I want a drink or treat

It helps me get the things I want

It really is quite neat!


Can you guess the special word

That works so well for me?

I just remember to say “Please!” --

Good manners don’t you see?


There is another thing I say

That shows good manners, too.

Whenever someone helps me out

I always say “Thank You!”


S. Gruber
-6-

Follow-Up Activities

Here are a few activities that you might do now or later on.

If you remember the childhood game “Mother, May I,” try playing it with the children.

As you go about your activities this week, look for other things that begin with the letter W. If you have preschool-age children, you might make a game out of writing every W word that you say or hear on a chalkboard or large piece of paper (water, work, warm, wagon, wind, wonderful, wish, wash, etc.).

Make a copy of one of the rhymes and say it over and over – children learn best by repetition!

See how many words you can think of together that rhyme with “PLEASE” (sneeze, trees, fleas, etc.). Rhyming helps children hear the smaller sounds that make up words. We call this “phonological awareness.” Even nonsense words are good for building phonological awareness.

Make paper crowns to remind everyone to say “please” and “thank you” – just like Old King Cole.


Artwork for you to use:









PLEASE
THANK YOU!




We had a special storytime today!
Today at daycare we read the book How Do Dinosaurs Eat Their Food . It is about having good table manners. We also read another book about manners and recited some rhymes about saying “please” and “thank you.”
Here is a rhyme you can practice saying at home. Saying rhymes helps children learn to distinguish the small sounds that make up words – which will help them learn to read later on. This is called “phonological awareness.” Repetition is important, too. So try to take the time to repeat this rhyme with your child.
There is a magic word I say

When I want a drink or treat

It helps me get the things I want

It really is quite neat!


Can you guess the special word

That works so well for me?

I just remember to say “Please!” --

Good manners don’t you see?


There is another thing I say

That shows good manners, too.

Whenever someone helps me out

I always say “Thank You!”



Another way to build phonological awareness is to practice thinking of rhyming words. See how many words you can think of together that rhyme with “PLEASE” (sneeze, trees, fleas, peas, etc.). Even nonsense words are good for building phonological awareness.

We also learned how to set the table (where to put the plate, cup, knife, fork and spoon). Practice putting things in a particular order also helps build pre-reading skills. Ask your child to show you what we learned! (You might ask them what is missing from the picture above, too.)


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