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Texarkana Independent School District


With instructions for writers


GRADING PERIOD:

Refer to scope and sequence

PLAN CODE:




writer:


Mary Markham

Course/subject:

Third Grade Math

Grade(s):

third

Time allotted for instruction:

Three to four class periods





Title:


More or less?

Lesson TOPIC:



Using problem solving strategies to solve problems involving addition and subtraction

TAKS Objective:


Objective 1: Select addition or subtraction and use the operation to solve problems involving whole numbers through 999

FoCUS TEKS and Student Expectation:


(3) The student adds and subtracts to solve meaningful problems involving whole numbers. The student is expected to:

(B) select addition or subtraction and use the operation to solve problems involving whole numbers through 999


Supporting TEKS and Student Expectations:


(3) The student adds and subtracts to solve meaningful problems involving whole numbers. The student is expected to:
(A) model addition and subtraction using pictures, words, and numbers





Concepts

Enduring Understandings/Generalizations/Principles

The student will understand that

Addition

Addition is part of everyday life. We add when we shop, when we put items together and want to know how many of something we have. It helps us to make sense of the world around us.

Subtraction

Subtraction is part of everyday life. We use it when we buy our lunch at school. When we have a set of objects that get used, given away, lost, or traded for something else, we can use subtraction to find out what we have left. Subtraction also helps us make sense of the world around us.

Problem Solving

Problem solving is an essential part of our daily lives whether it is a math problem or a problem that arises in another area. The better problem solvers we become, the better equipped we are to handle day to day challenges.


Elimination

When problem solving in math, it is important to eliminate extraneous information and determine what is important for solving the problem at hand.

Planning

Once you understand what you are trying to solve it is important to come up with a plan which will help you come to a reasonable conclusion.

Solving

Once you plan is developed, use your plan to solve.




I. Sequence of Activities (Instructional Strategies)



  1. Focus/connections/anticipatory set

    1. Present two containers of marbles to your students and ask them if there are more

marbles in container 1, container 2, or containers 1 and 2 together. Discuss and

ask: What operation you would use to find a number that is greater than?


Now pour all the marbles in container 1and let the students know that there are 50 marbles. Ask one student to take out 10 marbles, and then ask them: Now are there more than 50 marbles in container 1 or less? What operation would you use to find a

number that is less than 50?




B. Instructional activities

(demonstrations, lectures, examples, hands-on experiences, role play, active learning experience, art, music, modeling, think-aloud, discussion, reading, listening, viewing, etc.)

1. Objective: The student will learn when to use addition and subtraction to solve a

story problem.

2. Procedure: The teacher will present situations which require either addition or

subtraction to solve.

3. Modeling: The teacher will demonstrate with student participation using overhead,

base 10 mats and blocks, several examples of story problems


C. Guided activity or strategy

Day 1

1. Ask the students to use their base 10 blocks to build the following numbers on their

base 10 mats (copy included in materials) – 145 and 232
Example:

Total =



First #


100









Second #


100



100









  1. Put the transparency of the story problem below on the overhead.

Taylor and Alex were playing a game. Taylor scored 145 points and Alex scored 232 points. How many points did the two score together?




  1. Ask the students to use their strategies and to ask themselves if they need a number that is greater than 232 or less than 232.




  1. Put base 10 blocks together in the “Total” section to figure out answer ( 377points)




  1. Get student input and explanation and have students write the problem with labels.




  1. Now put the following (transparency 2) of the story problem below on the overhead.

Taylor and Alex were playing a game. Together they scored 377 points. If Taylor scored 145 points, how many points did Alex score?




  1. Have students repeat steps 1-5 making sure that in step one they start with the total and find their parts to find a solution. Ask students, what was different?




  1. Have students write the problem with labels.




  1. Repeat steps 1-5 with transparency 3




  1. Transparency 4 problem 1 guided without using base 10 materials



  1. Transparency 4 problem 2 with partner and check.





  1. Transparency 4 problems 3 – 6 with partner and check.




  1. Close by asking: When you subtract you get a (smaller) number. When you add you get a (larger/greater) number. Ask if someone can give an example of when you may need to add/subtract or to give an example of a problem.


Day 2

  1. Review day 1 concepts and practice with a partner using Day 2 worksheets.

  2. As partners work together circulate and monitor.

  3. You may choose to have a small group with students who are having difficulties.

  4. Check Day 2 worksheets together using Day 2 Transparencies


Day 3

  1. Conduct a brief Review using Day Three Review Transparency.

  2. Independent practice – Day Three worksheets



D. Accommodations/modifications

During day 2 when students are working with partners, if some students struggle, the teacher may want to pull them in a small group and work with them. The teacher may choose to let them continue to use the base 10 blocks or other manipulatives that may be helpful in their understanding.


E. Enrichment

Partners who finish early should make up story problems involving addition and subtraction and then solve.


II. STUDENT PERFORMANCE


A. Description

The students should be able to solve problems independently using strategies.


B. Accommodations/modifications

Reduce number of problems with reduced extraneous information.


C. Enrichment

Students come up with their own problems.



iii. Assessment of Activities
A. Description

The teacher will know the students have mastered problem solving with addition/subtraction when they:

1. Are able to consistently choose the correct operation when problem solving (85%) of

the time


2. Can eliminate extraneous information

3. Develop and construct story problems on their own


B. Rubrics/grading criteria

See Rubric for grading Day Three worksheets


C. Accommodations/modifications

Reduce number of problems with reduced extraneous information.


D. Enrichment

Students come up with their own problems.



E. Sample discussion questions

1. Why is it important to use you math strategies when solving a word problem?

2. When would you use addition in your daily life?

3. When would you use subtraction in you daily life?

4. What is one thing that you can do to help yourself solve a problem?

5. What should you always ask yourself after you find your solution?




IV. TAKS Preparation

A. Transition to TAKS context

The students will transfer what they have learned about problem solving to solve

TAKS or TAKS type questions.



B. Sample TAKS questions

1. Zach had 78 baseball cards, 124 football cards, and 99 basketball cards in his sports card collection. How many basketball and baseball cards were in his sports

card collection? Mark your answer.


  • 301

  • 21

  • 177

  • 223

2. There were 227 students at Nash Elementary who bought their lunch in the school

cafeteria on Monday. Sixty-eight of the students chose hamburgers, 39 chose

fruit bowl, and rest chose main menu. How many of the student chose main menu?

Mark your answer.


  • 120

  • 188

  • 334

  • 107




  1. The table below shows students favorite foods in the third grade classes at Nash

Elementary.
Students Favorite Foods

Food

Number of students

pizza

22

Spaghetti


15

Cheeseburgers

13

French-fries

19

How many students liked pizza or spaghetti the best?
Record your answer in the boxes below. Then fill in the bubbles. Be sure to use the correct place value.





















































V. Key Vocabulary

Sum, difference, greater than, less than, strategies, addition, subtraction, eliminate, extraneous,

extra information, increase, decrease, compare, combine

VI. Resources
A. Textbook
B. Supplementary materials/equipment

1. base 10 blocks

2. base 10 mats (copy included)

3. Transparencies (hard copy included to make your own)

4. Day 1, 2 and 3 worksheets (included)

5. Rubric for grading Day 3 worksheet


C. Technology

Overhead
VII. follow up activities



(reteaching, cross-curricular support, technology activities, next lesson in sequence, etc.)

When this lesson is completed, the teacher should include problems similar to these in their daily

practice and homework so that objectives taught are spiraled.
Students who did not score well should correct problems in small group with the teacher and

have an opportunity to do extra practice of the objective.


VIII. Teacher Notes

1. Before this lesson is taught, students should already be familiar with the algorithms of

addition and subtraction with or without regrouping.

2. This objective is tied in with TAKS objective 6.



3. This objective should be continuously reinforced once it has been taught.


 Division of Curriculum and Instruction  School Improvement Department  Texarkana Independent School District





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