Insurance Date: December 15, 2010 Deadline for submission of Questions: January 04, 2011 Submission of Answers: o/a January 10, 2011 Closing Date: January 25, 2011 Closing Time: 3: 00pm Nairobi, Kenya local time Place of Performance: Kenya

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D)

SUBSTANTIAL INVOLVEMENT

In accordance with USAID policy and standard procedures related to Cooperative Agreements (CA) and given the nature of this new program, USAID/KENYA desires to be engaged at the appropriate levels and times to assure the achievement of the two parties’ mutual program objectives and meet the defined program requirements.

Consequently, the following are the Substantial Involvement provisions that will be included in the Cooperative Agreement. However, subject to the mutual agreement of both parties, these provisions may be amended to reflect appropriate changes as a consequence of the program’s implementation and possible changes in the situation in Kenya.
Subject to possible further refinement following the arrival of the Cooperative Agreement Recipient’s Technical Advisor or Chief of Party, USAID/Kenya will:
Designate key personnel positions, and approve the awardee’s candidates for those positions and any successors; it is envisaged that the Key Personnel positions will include the:


    • Technical Advisor

    • National Program Coordinator

    • Capacity Building/ Monitoring and Evaluation Specialist

    • Gender and Conflict Expert




  • Approve the Recipient’s annual work plans, and any significant amendments thereof.

  • Approve the Recipient’s monitoring and evaluation plans in accordance with USAID’s Performance Monitoring Plan.

  • Participate in monitoring progress toward the achievement of the Recipient’s program objectives.

  • Concur in any sub-agreements between the Recipient and another organization intended to serve as a program implementer.

  • Review and approve any deviations from standards requirements for “branding” and “marking.”


E) REPORTS

1. Quarterly Reports: Quarterly reports reflecting work plan activities will be produced and will be due no later than 15 days after the end of each quarter. Quarterly reports must include reference to annual work plan activities, activities completed and not completed, results (based on the component objectives), indicators, qualitative data such as success stories, timeframe, quarterly funds expended, total project expenses to date, and estimated amounts still available, pipeline analysis, and anticipated burn-rates. Discrepancies (if any) between the work plan and reported progress must be explained and the work plan amended accordingly. Accomplishments will be described both quantitatively and qualitatively as they relate to project objectives. The quarterly reports will be accompanied by at least one Success Story (per USAID standards) from each of the regions. In addition, they will comment on existing and potential problems in the project implementation and any anticipated or actual delays will be explained and a plan for corrective actions initiated.

At a minimum, Quarterly Reports will include the following information:


  • Brief outline of project purpose and approach;

  • Brief description of significant events during the reported period;

  • Status of each task as defined in the Work Plan;

  • Status of overall project progress per performance indicators as defined in the PMP;

  • List of reports/deliverables completed in the reporting period;

  • Performance problems during the reporting period and variance from the Annual Work Plan and PMP;

  • A detailed financial report of expenditures and the following quarterly budget;

  • Four success stories (one from each of the regions), copies of any videos, photos and other communication and marketing materials developed, and;

  • A list of major activities planned for the next quarter.


2. Final Report: A written final report is due no later than 30 days after the end of the project, which will include, at a minimum, quantitative and qualitative accomplishments or shortcomings, description of all activities undertaken during the period of the project and the relative significance of these activities, comments and recommendations regarding unfinished work and/or follow-on activities, conclusions, and a financial report that describes in detail how funds were used.
3. Financial Reports:
In accordance with 22 CFR 226.52, the SF 425 will be submitted on a quarterly basis. The recipient shall submit these forms in the following manner:

(1) The SF-425 and SF425a (if necessary) must be submitted via electronic format to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (http://www.dpm.psc.gov).  A copy of this form shall also be submitted at the same time to the Agreement Officer and the Agreement Officer Technical Representative.

(2) The SF-425 and SF425a (as appropriate) shall be submitted electronically to the Agreement Officer Technical Representative (AOTR) with one copy to the Agreement Officer. 
     USAID/Kenya     

    Agreement Officer’s Technical  

    Representative (AOTR) - TBD         

      


    USAID/EA/RAAO

    Regional Agreement Officer

   

(3) In accordance with 22 CFR 226.70-72, the original and two copies of all final financial reports shall be submitted to M/FM, the Agreement Officer (if requested) and the AOTR.  The electronic version of the final SF 425 shall be submitted to HHS in accordance with paragraph (1) above.


F) PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION
1. Technical Oversight. USAID/Kenya Democracy & Governance will designate one of its staff as the Agreement Officer Technical Representative (AOTR). The AOTR will review and approve selection criteria which the contractor will use to review and approve sub-awards. Final sub-award approval is authorized by the Agreement Officer.
2. Key Personnel

Technical Advisor. The Offeror will recruit a local or international expert to serve as. This expert will be considered to be key personnel. The Technical Advisor will serve as the Partner’s representative to the Program Management Committee, coordinate the delivery of all contracted project inputs, and ensure that all project activities are well-planned, analytically sound, effectively implemented, and kept within budget limits. The Technical Advisor is also expected to personally supervise all granting and procurement activities. The Technical Advisor will have strong knowledge of gender and conflict, program implementation, monitoring and evaluation skills.

3. Language Requirements

All deliverables shall be produced in English; however the AOTR may direct that translations into Swahili be provided on a case by case basis.


G) DELIVERABLES
1. Performance Management Plan: A successful proposal will include a comprehensive Performance Management Plan (PMP) with qualitative and quantitative indicators to address progress towards each objective and towards the cross-cutting elements indicated in the Program Description. For each result, the performance monitoring plan should include –


  • Results-level performance indicator(s)

  • Targets

  • Baselines, when known, or a timeframe to determine baselines

  • Data collection method to be used

  • Data reliability and timeliness information (intrinsic data quality)

  • Indicator validity (relationship between indicator and desired output or result)

The following is an illustrative list of possible indicators:



  • Creation of a conflict and/or fragility early warning system (SMS women’s peace network);

  • Response mechanism to conflict: (SMS women’s peace network) created;

  • Number of USG-assisted facilitated events geared toward strengthening understanding and mitigating conflict between groups

  • Number of peace-building structures established or strengthened with USG assistance that engage conflict-affected citizens in peace and/or reconciliation processes

  • Number of public fora/educational events to teach public about peace processes supported by USG assistance

  • Number of people attending public fora/educational events supported by USG assistance to teach public about peace process, disaggregated for age group, gender, and home town;
  • Degree of engagement between GoK, civil society organizations and other actors in implementing conflict mitigation and reconciliation processes;


  • # of county level peace platforms developed;

  • National-level peace platform created

  • #MPs, political candidates and parties who attend National Women’s Peace Summit and sign National Women’s Peace Platform for the Future of Kenya

  • Number of USG-supported GBV prevention and awareness-raising activities conducted

  • Qualitative data on changes made at the community-level regarding conflict management

  • Number of USG-supported events which are intended to build capacity in partner organizations

A much more comprehensive approach, incorporating a broader range of indicators, will be needed to monitor project progress and impact towards the overall project goal. A successful proposal will contain a robust M & E plan which will monitor successes and challenges in implementation as well as progress towards societal and behavioral change.


2. Work Plan: The contractor should deliver a detailed work plan to USAID/Kenya for consultation within thirty (30) days of award. The scope and format of the work plan will be agreed to between the contractor and the AOTR. The plan will, at a minimum, include:


  • Expected results (based on component objectives) and performance measures tied to the PMP, including standard USAID indicators (included in the illustrative list of possible indicators)

  • a timetable for implementation of the year’s proposed activities, including target completion dates

  • Information on how activities will be implemented

  • Details of planned collaboration

  • A functional budget.

SECTION C - PROGRAM DESCRIPTION


PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Women’s Peace Campaign

The project will provide support for Gender Based Violence (GBV) awareness and prevention activities, will establish a viable women’s network, and will strengthen women’s organizations and women leaders. Although this is a short project timeframe, the US Embassy views these activities as an important part of a USG conflict mitigation strategy in preparation for the 2012 elections. Women connected through a peace network will be equipped to rapidly mitigate violence. The local Peace Platforms will provide community members with a tool they can use to hold their local leaders accountable to the community, especially during the 2012 elections. It is expected by the end of the project the following targets will have been met:


  • Completion of a national peace campaign, inclusive of women’s peace forums in each county, in each province, and concluding with a national women’s peace summit.

  • National and Local peace platforms and action plans will have been formulated and made visible.

  • Community GBV awareness and prevention activities will be supported in all regions of Kenya.

  • An SMS network will be established, operational, and a plan created for its sustainability.

Background

Kenya has not yet emerged from the period of instability which erupted following the Presidential elections of 2007. The 2-month period of widespread turmoil left over 1,000 dead and 500,000 displaced. The ethnic violence “was alarming in its ferocity and scale, but was by no means a peculiar phenomenon with regards to the electoral environment of the country. Past elections in Kenya since independence have also been characterized by varying degrees of electoral violence, ostensibly on issues revolving around land problems and ethnicity”1.

There were gendered aspects of the violence. Gender-based violence and sexual gender-based violence are common weapons used to destroy and subdue communities in times of unrest. Women and children bore the brunt of the violence in their homes, while fleeing violence-prone areas, and after seeking refuge in IDP camps. The Nairobi Women’s Hospital Gender Based Recovery Unit reported that they counseled 1,710 survivors in the IDP camps2. During the period between Dec 27, 2007 and February 29, 2008 the unit reported that it treated 443 survivors of SGBV, of which 80% were rape/defilement cases. Amongst these reports were an alarming number of incidences of gang rape. The incidences of violence against women increased significantly during the time of the Post-Election Violence (PEV) and its aftermath, especially in the IDP camps3.

There are alarming incidences of GBV in Kenya, even outside of times of crisis.

The 2003 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey (KDHS), a representative survey of 9,000 Kenya households, found that 49% of Kenyan women had experienced violence since age 15 with Nairobi (51%), Nyanza (60%), and Western (73%) provinces having the highest rates. One in four women reported that they had experienced violence in the previous 12 months. 83% of women reported that they had experienced physical violence in their childhood, 46% reported that they had been sexually abused in childhood, and 25% of 12-24 year olds reported that the first time they had sex it was forced. Over 60% of these women and children stated that they did not report the violence to anyone.

The 2008 version of the KDHS was slightly less comprehensive, but contained similar findings: 39 percent of women (married, divorced, or separated) reported that they had been physically or sexually assaulted by their husbands.

The Kenya Gender Data Sheet of 2005 reported that more than 2 out of 3 women surveyed agreed that a husband is justified in beating his wife for at least one reason.


Women’s Justice and Empowerment Initiative (WJEI)

The Women’s Peace Campaign Project is one component of the larger Women’s Justice and Empowerment Initiative. This project is a part of the first of the 3 program elements.

WJEI is a three year, $55,000,000 program to support the efforts of Benin, Kenya, South Africa and Zambia to combat violence against women. It was designed to raise awareness and improve the capacity in these countries to investigate and prosecute perpetrators and assist female victims of rape and abuse.

The purpose of the Kenya WJEI program is to bolster women's justice and empowerment by addressing the following interrelated program elements:



Helping to raise awareness of the problem of gender-based violence. This component seeks to increase the awareness of the prevalence of GBV, care and support resources available to survivors, public policy and laws regarding women’s rights under the SOA, assist communities to overcome the barriers to recognizing GBV as a problem and ultimately contribute to durable behavior and attitude change.

Improving the ability to investigate, prosecute, and adjudicate GBV cases. This component seeks to strengthen the capacity of Kenyan legal systems to protect women from violence and to punish violators by increasing the capacity of the police, prosecutors, and judges to understand and combat gender based criminal conduct through, in part, effective investigations and use of forensic techniques,.
  1. Providing victims with medical and psychosocial support to enhance their reintegration into their respective societies. This component seeks to strengthen the capacity of health, legal, and social organizations that provide assistance to survivors of GBV.


The Women’s Justice and Empowerment Initiative is implemented by the Department of State, USAID, and the Department of Justice. WJEI is managed by The Office of Public Health (OPH) and the Governing Justly and Democratically (GJD) at USAID. It is managed by the International Criminal Investigative Training Assistance Program (ICITAP) and Overseas Prosecutorial Development and Training (OPDAT) at the Department of Justice.

Goal

The goal of this project is to improve local and national women’s organization’s capacity to address violence against women and to create a grassroots-based network that will serve to prevent and mitigate conflict, especially in the lead up to the 2012 election.



Objective

The objective of the Women’s Peace Campaign project is to engage women, of all socio-economic groups and in all counties, in a national effort to establish peace in their homes and communities.


This project aims to change societal acceptance that women will continually face violence, whether in their homes or due to politically motivated ethnic strife. Activities will include men, remembering that meaningful change will not occur without men as men are the primary perpetrators of violence against women. Therefore, project activities will purposefully engage men and women in order to affect change. Educational activities and community discussions, as a part of this project, will challenge the public to reject violence against women as an acceptable part of life. Community and national peace forums will strengthen efforts to mitigate and prevent conflict at the local and national levels by strengthening and clarifying grassroots calls for peace.

The project has two intermediate objectives that mutually reinforce each other and address the overall project goal.


  1. Create a national women’s peace network with local action plans and peace platforms.


  2. Support GBV awareness and prevention activities at the community level.

Activities funded through this project are intended to advance four cross-cutting themes:



  1. Support cooperation amongst women’s organizations and develop coordinated community responses to GBV.

  2. Strengthen the capabilities of grassroots groups to affect positive change.

  3. Increase the voice of grassroots women’s rights organizations.

  4. Empower women and decentralize decision-making, encouraging leadership development within women’s organizations.

Program Description

The above-mentioned proposed USAID activities to support peace-building, women’s empowerment, and respect for human rights in Kenya will be implemented and managed by a partner(s). The implementing partner will be responsible for working with relevant women’s groups, NGOs, CBOs4, and other stakeholders to achieve the overall and intermediate objectives of this project while advancing the three cross-cutting themes. The contractor will provide grants to women’s groups, NGOs, and CBOs for activities to advance the objectives of this project as well as for institutional capacity building.



Intermediate Objectives

The Women’s Peace Campaign project has two intermediate objectives that will produce the overall project objective of engaging women, of all socio-economic groups and in all counties, in a national effort to establish peace in their homes and communities.


1. Create a national women’s peace network. As mothers, grandmothers, wives, sisters, aunts, cousins, friends, and leaders, women have played a very significant role in establishing peace in their communities in Kenya. Throughout Africa and in Kenya, groups or organizations of women have proven to be effective mediators and peace builders. Women are also sometimes able to transcend ethnic boundaries by marrying across ethnic lines.

Peace summits will be held in each county. The purpose of these local summits is to mitigate and perhaps begin to resolve conflict at the local level. The result of the summits will be tangible action plans. These meetings will engage its participants to question:


  • When does violence occur?

  • Where does it occur?

  • Why does it occur?

  • What can we do to prevent it?

  • What is our response in the aftermath?

Participants will then come up with county action plans and peace platforms at the local levels. The work done at the local forums will continue at regional5 conferences and eventually to the national peace summit.

The local action plans will establish a community-driven and community-based plan to prevent and manage conflict.

The local peace platforms will provide community members with a tool they can use to hold their local leaders accountable to the community, especially during the 2012 elections.

The regional and national gatherings will build upon and analyze the work done at the local levels, building upon the local action plans and peace platforms, to formulate a national action plan and peace platform.

The action plans and peace platforms will be made visible at both the local and national levels (i.e. through billboards, posters, or painted on walls) in order to reinforce local commitment to the agreed upon platform and action plan. Such marketing of the national plan is a part of the strategy to increase the volume of women’s voices and visibility of women’s positions in the national arena as well as a mechanism to hold political leaders accountable to peace platforms which they sign.

The discussions which occur as a part of these peace summits is itself a conflict intervention. The discussion will encourage conflict resolution between participants of different ethnic groups. Therefore, skilled mediators must be used to facilitate these discussions.

This is an upstream and downstream strategy, envisaged to start from the grassroots and building to the national level. Community decisions will be pushed upstream, while capacity-building services will be pushed downstream. Information will also be shared amongst partners, laterally.

The establishment of local action plans to manage conflict and dissuade violence and the establishment of a national women’s platform for peace will contribute to the efforts to build a sustainable peace in Kenya. The women’s network will push for national reforms, such as the implementation of the Peace Accord and Agenda 4 reforms, and can be used by grassroots organizations to garner support for local issues.

Kenyan women’s organizations have an active history. They have often been the subject of political influence and cooptation. The Women’s Peace Campaign project, though of short duration, will create a unifying process to strengthen all the different women’s organizations and create a common vision of the future.  The focus on peace and mitigating violence against women is a common thread that unites women’s groups across the country, but one that has not been focused on to enrich women networks and advocacy capacity.

The network that will be established is part of a USG conflict mitigation strategy in preparation for the 2012 elections. This is a USG priority because women were the root promoters of peace during the post-election violence. This project will create communication linkages between Embassy Nairobi and women’s groups all across the country. If violence breaks out in 2012, USG will be better positioned to know what is going on and to assist these women’s organizations to mitigate violence. The network will be positioned to serve as an early warning system and women in the network will be able to support each other in local efforts to manage conflict.

This activity will have regional coordination which will be led by organizations with strong regional presence. There will be a heavy emphasis on sub-granting to local partners for the purpose of strengthening community and women’s groups while building a sustainable network. The use of grants and sub-grants is a deliberate strategy to build support and partnership among the partner organizations.

Specifically, the Implementing Partner will be responsible for:


  1. Granting funds to regional lead organizations

  2. Organizing the national summit

  3. Coordinating activities amongst regional and local partners

  4. Providing support for local regional and local partners as they conduct the peace summits

  5. Building capacity in regional lead organizations, Kenyan organizations with a grassroots presence

  6. Establishing a sustainable women’s peace network

  7. Creating a sustainable communication strategy, with SMS texting and email capabilities for communicating regular partner news as well as emergency rapid response use

  8. Developing a sustainable partnership, inclusive of fundraising plan, with a telecommunications company (i.e. Safaricom, Zain). The offeror should include a fundraising plan in the proposal, which considers how this SMS network can be sustained

  9. Monitoring and evaluation

The Regional Lead Organizations will be responsible for:



  1. Organizing and coordinating the local and regional peace forums (the regional organizations are likely to subcontract with local organizations in order to support the local peace summits)

  2. Coordinating activities amongst local partners and community-level activities

  3. Building sustainable women’s networks within the region, with SMS texting capability to communicate immediately with all members

  4. Incorporating men and men’s groups into the grassroots activities


2. Support GBV awareness and prevention activities at the community level.

Regional and community level partners will also incorporate GBV awareness and prevention activities at the community level. Partners must be engaged in activities to address both objectives of the Women’s Peace Campaign project. In the local summits, communities will explore how, why, and when men and women engage in destructive and violent behaviors. The transformative educational activities will encourage change.

Local and regional partners will engage in transformative educational activities - activities which encourage fundamental social change to support women’s human rights - with the communities with whom they are working. The focus will be on behavioral change for both genders, recognizing that to effect real social change both men and women must be targeted. Activities focused on empowering women will be balanced with activities to address negative socialization of men. Therefore, special consideration will be given to proposals which include men, as well as those which encourage women to seek economic empowerment and independence, and incorporate local authorities into the activities.

There are very active women’s organizations which are working around issues of GBV in Kenya. This project, through working with the regional lead organizations, will encourage cooperation amongst these organizations. We anticipate that local organizations that work together on the Women’s Peace Campaign will develop stronger local and regional partnerships that should also result in more integrated victim support services, as we anticipate that most of the organizations which are active in the Women’s Peace Campaign will be those which have ongoing victim support programs. This is expected as an indirect result of the project.

Specifically, the Contractor will be responsible for:


  1. Sub-granting funds to regional organizations for local GBV Awareness and Prevention activities

  2. Building capacity in local organizations

  3. Monitoring and evaluation

The Regional Lead Organizations will be responsible for:



  1. Sub-granting to local organizations

  2. Monitoring and evaluation

  3. Coordinating activities amongst local partners

  4. Building sustainable women’s networks within the region, with SMS texting capability to communicate immediately with all members

  5. Incorporating men and men’s groups into the grassroots activities


Cross-cutting Themes

The following cross-cutting themes should be integrated across the project components to ensure the achievement of project objectives. Proposals should contain indicators to measure progress against these themes. Proposals should also contain additional cross-cutting themes if they enhance the implementation and effectiveness of the proposed technical approach.

1. Support cooperation amongst women’s organizations and develop coordinated community responses to GBV: There are over a hundred organizations, mostly small NGOs and CBOs, who work on GBV issues in Kenya. Many of these organizations are members of various GBV working groups yet members still complain of poor partnerships and intense competition for funding. This project will encourage cooperation, especially within regions, between organizations in their activities related to GBV. The Women’s Peace Campaign project, though of short duration, will create a unifying process to strengthen all the different women’s organizations and create a common vision of the future.   This project will encourage cooperation amongst these organizations. We anticipate that local organizations that work together on the Women’s Peace Campaign will develop stronger local and regional partnerships that should also result in more integrated victim support services, as we anticipate that most of the organizations which are active in the Women’s Peace Campaign will be those which have ongoing victim support programs. This is expected as an indirect result of the program.

The Offeror will be expected to work with the National GBV Working Group, local GBV working groups and any other relevant networking and partnership groups, with the goal of strengthening these groups to make them more productive.

Strong partnerships between women’s rights organizations will enhance women’s rights and USAID/Kenya views this as a critical outcome of this project. The network that will be established is part of a USG conflict mitigation strategy in preparation for the 2012 elections. This is a USG priority because women were the root promoters of peace during the post-election violence. This project will also create communication linkages between Embassy Nairobi and women’s groups all across the country. If violence happens to break out in 2012, USG will be better positioned to know what is going on and to assist these women’s organizations to mitigate violence.
Proposals should take an approach that will:


  1. Stimulate cooperation amongst women’s organizations at the national level through the deliberate creation of networking and learning opportunities amongst partners;

  2. Stimulate cooperation at the community level between leaders and care-providers whom survivors turn to for help after being victimized;

  3. Result in a very functional network with SMS texting capability to communicate immediately with all members; and

  4. Offerors may submit a strategy to describe how they intend to build partnerships amongst the women’s organizations.


2. Strengthen the capabilities of grassroots groups to affect positive change: Offerors should consider the ways in which this project will build capacity in partner organizations, specifically targeting grassroots and local women’s organizations. Special consideration will be given to proposals which have developed capacity-building programs into their approach. Offerors should develop capacity-building programs which are tailored to the specific needs of each Regional Lead Organization.

Proposals should indicate the method which will be taken to undertake capacity-building activities and describe the proposed organizational assessment, activities, and evaluation.

3. Increase the voice of grassroots and women’s organizations: Women form the majority in Kenya yet women leaders are in the minority. Women’s organizations have historically been utilized by politicians to garner votes. However, women leaders have not had much success in organizing themselves, without this type of interaction with politicians. This project should affect the ability of women’s organizations and women’s leaders to press for change and to form more equitable relationships with politicians. Efforts should be made to ensure that the peace campaign is not hijacked by local politicians, that the voices which are being heard are those of local women who participate in the peace campaign. It is very likely that local politicians will interfere with this project; therefore a stakeholder analysis will be very useful in the project design phase.
A central component of this project is strengthening women’s ability to affect change. This is done through providing opportunity for women and women’s groups to take leadership roles in local and national arenas.

Offerors may submit a stakeholder analysis, or similar document which indicates consideration of potentially disruptive parties.



SECTION D - CERTIFICATIONS, ASSURANCES, AND OTHER STATEMENTS OF THE RECIPIENT (MAY 2006)

NOTE: When these Certifications, Assurances, and Other Statements of Recipient are used for cooperative agreements, the term "Grant" means "Cooperative Agreement".


References:
Certifications, Assurances & Other Statements of Recipients: http://www.usaid.gov/policy/ads/300/303sad.pdf
Forms:

http://www.grants.gov/agencies/approvedstandard forms.isp

Standard Form 424: www.grants.gov/techlib/SF424-V2.0.pdf

Standard Form 424 A: http://www.grants.gov/techlib/SF424A-V1.0.pdf

Standard Form 424B: http://www.grants.gov/techlib/SF424B-V1.0.pdf

OMB CIRCULAR A-133 OR SIMILAR AUDITS
If applicable, please provide the date of your most recent A-133 or similar audit, including findings and results of such audits.
Solicitation No.________________________________________________
Application No.________________________________________________
Date of application______________________________________________
Name of Recipient______________________________________________
Typed Name and Title____________________________________________
_____________________________________________

Signature _________________________________Date__________________



SECTION D – CERTIFICATION, ASSURANCES, AND OTHER STATEMENTS OF

THE RECIPIENT




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