Intermediate award titles



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PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION

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AWARD and ROUTE TITLE

MA International Broadcast Journalism

INTERMEDIATE AWARD TITLES

PgC International Broadcast Journalism

PgD International Broadcast Journalism



Name of the Teaching Institution

Sheffield Hallam University

Mode(s) of Attendance

(eg. FT/PT/SW/DL)

FT/PT


UCAS CODE

N/A

Professional/Statutory/Regulatory Body Recognising this Programme




QAA Subject Benchmark Statement or other relevant external reference point



Date of Validation


Dec 20th 2006

1 PROGRAMME AIMS

The main aims of the proposal are to:



  • develop effective practitioners in broadcast journalism,

  • offer students from home and abroad a broadcast journalism education which both meets national standards and addresses the different needs of overseas students working in an international context,

  • offer enhancement for professionals in broadcast journalism which incorporates the newest trends in media broadcasting, as it responds to new digital media and requires multi-skilled practitioners,

  • offer opportunities for broadcast journalism students to choose different specialisms through electives.


2 PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

2.1 Knowledge and understanding covered within the Programme. By the end of the programme you will be able to

  1. Apply operational and conceptual skills and techniques of the craft of journalism.

  2. Understand and employ ethical practices in applying the skills of journalism.

  3. Demonstrate knowledge of legal, regulatory and governmental constraints on broadcasting and the media, with an international perspective.

  4. Demonstrate a professional, flexible and confident approach to working practices in international broadcast journalism.

  5. Operate in an informed way in the rapidly changing broadcast journalism industry.

  6. Undertake research and apply insights and original thinking to your future work in the media industries.

2.2 Intellectual/Subject/Professional/Key skills covered within the Programme: by the end of the programme you will be able to

2.2.1 Intellectual skills

You will be able to:



  1. Make mature, creative contributions to research, project development work and specific areas of journalism.

  2. Employ enhanced research, project development, production and technical skills to integrate theoretical and practical concerns within a given project.

  3. Operate within a mature conceptual, analytical and creative framework to research and develop projects and practise acquired skills and techniques.

  4. Analyse the international and cultural contexts and the impact on society of news and broadcast journalism.

  5. Be self reflective in creative practice with an intellectual approach in both individual and group working contexts.

2.2.2 Subject or professional skills

You will be able to:



  1. Gather and present news of a professional standard in national and international contexts.

  2. Employ the necessary technical skills required within television, radio and web-based news.

  3. Originate and develop ideas in substantive and treatment terms for news stories.

  4. Undertake newsgathering, research and investigative activities

  5. Interview individuals face-to-face or over the telephone in a studio, on location, live and recorded.

  6. Write for a range of different outlets, television, radio and multi-media


  7. Substantiate material and ensure it is accurate and is within all legal/regulatory confines.

  8. Operate effectively as an international broadcast journalist in a variety of testing situations.

2.2.3 Key Skills

You will be able to:



  1. Apply your knowledge and understanding of the subject to solve problems creatively.

  2. Demonstrate professionalism in your discipline across a range of contexts.

  3. Work in multidisciplinary team environments with a high level awareness of individual contributions to overall objectives.

  4. Apply a high level of critical and reflective thinking in the context of newsmaking and production.

  5. Apply high level organisational skills in relation to tasks and projects.

  6. Communicate effectively using an appropriate range of tools and techniques.

  7. Negotiate effectively in relation to tasks and projects.

  8. Critically evaluate and assess your own work and progress.

3 LEARNING, TEACHING AND ASSESSMENT

3.1 The approach to Learning and Teaching within the Programme

In line with Faculty and University LTA strategy, the course emphasises:



  • your development as an independent learner, necessary for effective operation as a practitioner in journalism,

  • the use of communications technology, primarily Blackboard, to ensure effective staff-student contact and support learning,
  • quality feedback on your assessed work, particularly the embedding of formative feedback within applied areas of work,

  • the encouragement of lifelong learning and career development, with a focus on your employability.

To develop you as an independent learner with the ability to identify skills gaps and conduct self-assessment of overall achievement in the modules, you will keep learning journals for core and elective modules which will form a substantial element of your personal development profile. This, together with your portfolio of work, forms a Personal Development Portfolio aimed at demonstrating your employability. Module assignments and activities combine a mix of production exercises and group work on 'live' news projects, enhancing employability and strengthening professional networks and opportunities.

The emphasis moving through the three semesters is away from predominantly tutor-led work towards confident self-directed student-led work. The aim is for you to engage in different modes of learning, including workshop exercises, practical projects and simulations of professional practice, underpinned with more traditional lecture and seminar learning for conceptual and theoretical areas. Wherever possible, the theoretical and the practical interpenetrate, as the aim is to place professional practice in a reflective context. Semesters 1 and 2 contain primarily tutor-led work, but built increasingly around areas of individual professional practice.

In Semester 3, the MA component of the course encourages predominantly self-directed study, through the negotiation of a programme of work contained in a learning contract expressed between you and the course team. This contract will apply the learning experienced in the previous two semesters in either a substantial piece of written research or through research leading to production. Common to both options will be evidence of investigation in work that has something new to say on a subject, or throws new light on it. In production work, you will be working either alone or in self-selected groups, depending on your chosen media and projects will be overseen by a nominated member of the course team. Both will be expected to demonstrate high standards of journalism both in content and process, together with a capacity to critically evaluate it.

3.2 The approach to Assessment and Feedback within the Programme

Throughout the course, assessment is integrated with the teaching and learning experience. In the first semester assessment performs a predominantly formative role. Although there is conventional summative assessment in Journalism, Law And Society and Comparative Analysis of International Media, it also has a formative role as it sets the scene for integration of these aspects into future work. Summative assessment in production work has a formative element in that detailed feedback sheets are used to guide your future progress.

Each module has explicit assessment criteria talked through with you at several points during the semester and all course work is used as a developmental tool. Production work is generated throughout the semester with regular open peer and tutor review sessions when you will be expected to discuss your work with the rest of the group and you can create the final form of your semester production portfolio from a great variety of material. The assessment criteria for production work in this semester emphasise the nuts and bolts of broadcast journalism production and you have the opportunity to refine and develop your work along the way, taking feedback into account. Self evaluation is an important part of the assessment strategy and you will be encouraged to relate your work both to theory and the practice of others. This is expressed through the critical review sessions described above and through written evaluation of production and the production process

The assessment strategy in the second semester follows a similar pattern although the thrust of the assessment criteria moves away from the nuts and bolts to a more advanced and conceptual focus which brings content, structure and coherence to the fore. Peer review and self evaluation continue to feature strongly. Work deadlines during this semester are staggered to ensure that the greater complexity of the production work does not push out other areas and feedback can inform the larger projects.

In the third semester the assessment strategy focuses more on the individual, as is appropriate under a student-led learning contract. However, production work will be closely monitored to ensure it is in line with the general learning outcomes, and will not be allowed to progress without tutor approval. Production tutorials will form an integral part of the assessment philosophy as the feedback and discussion they generate are themselves a form of assessment. If you take the dissertation route you will receive individual tutorial guidance and feedback.

4 PROGRAMME DESIGN AND STRUCTURE

The Programme structure establishes a grounding of basic skills at Certificate stage, such that a non-expert graduate could take the certificate and have sufficient generic knowledge to operate in the industry. The Diploma stage builds on this base by providing a range of advanced skills and allowing a degree of specialism. The range of electives available will be periodically reviewed. This stage will be that at which BJTC accreditation will apply, when sought.

At the dissertation stage you can apply yourself to a specialist area through the project, or investigate an area of academic importance through dissertation, which offers development opportunities both for practically and theoretically minded learners. If you elect for a dissertation, you must already have taken "Researching the Media".

Full time route

Semester 1

Being a journalist

(15credits)

Mandatory


Journalism, Law And Society

(15 credits)

Mandatory


Production and editing skills in radio and TV

(15 Credits)

Mandatory


Comparative Analysis of International Media

(15 Credits)

Mandatory


PgC at 60 Credits

Semester 2


Specialist editorial skills: working in the newsroom

(15 Credits)

Mandatory


Specialised production skills: television/radio

(15 Credits)

Mandatory


Web development for media professionals

(15 Credits)

Mandatory





Plus one 15 Credit elective from:

Media Policy in the EU

Multicultural and Intercultural Communication,

Language and Writing,

Hypermedia Design,

Researching the Media,

Theories of International Media,



PgD at 120 Credits

Semester 3

ONE 15 credit module from the list of Electives, plus

Dissertation (45 Credits) Elective

OR

Project (60 Credits) Elective



MA at 180 Credits

Part time route (one possible configuration)

Note that this configuration is possible as there will be two f/t intakes per year, and so each block of modules will be run twice per year. Other configurations are possible.


Semester 1

Being a journalist

(15credits)

Mandatory


Production and editing skills in radio and TV

(15 Credits)

Mandatory


Semester 2

Specialist editorial skills: working in the newsroom

(15 Credits)

Mandatory


Plus one elective from:

Media Policy in the EU

Multicultural and Intercultural Communication,

Language and Writing,

Hypermedia Design,

Researching the Media,

Theories of International Media,

(15 Credits each)




Semester 3

Journalism, Law And Society

(15 credits)

Mandatory


Comparative Analysis of International Media

(15 Credits)

Mandatory




PgC at 60 Credits

Semester 4

Web development for media professionals

(15 Credits)

Mandatory


Specialised production skills: television/radio

(15 Credits)

Mandatory


PgD at 120 Credits

Semester 5-6

ONE 15 credit module from the list of Electives, plus

Dissertation (45 Credits) Elective

OR

Project (60 Credits) Elective



MA at 180 Credits

5 PROGRESSION/CAREER ROUTES

When you have successfully completed your MA in International Broadcast Journalism you will have a wide range of skills that employers are seeking.

The next generation of broadcast journalists, indeed all journalists, must be multi-skilled and be able to operate within the worlds of television, radio or multimedia. There is convergence of all three areas within such organisations as the BBC, Sky TV, CNN and many other premier news organisations within the UK and overseas. 

One of the most important aspects of the MA course is that it will equip you with all the skills required within the industry and lead to a wide choice of careers within it. You may wish to enter the world of news presentation, foreign or home news reporting, production routes within broadcasting or documentary filmmaking.  But it is crucial for you to be able to operate across all three areas, television, radio and online, as journalists often move from one area of work to another, or indeed are engaged with several forms of journalism at a time.

6 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS AND ENTRY PROFILE

6.1 Admissions Policy:

Applications are encouraged from both domestic and international candidates with a diversity of backgrounds who are considering a career in broadcast journalism and can demonstrate the required aptitude and potential. Applicants considered for admission will normally be required to attend an interview if resident in the UK and complete an aptitude paper designed to assess their potential in key areas of writing, current affairs knowledge and general enthusiasm for and interest in the course. If the applicant is not resident in the UK, a suitable alternative will be arranged e.g. telephone interview & completed paper. Candidates will be required to demonstrate their voice potential e.g. through the submission of an audio tape. Selection will be determined by the candidate's relevant experience and potential for development.



Admissions Criteria:

Applicants should possess:



  • a good honours degree in any subject from a recognised UK institution or its international equivalent

OR

  • relevant professional experience

AND

  • a good standard of written and spoken English where English is a second language, normally at least IELTS 6.5

6.2 APPLICANT ENTRY PROFILE: the knowledge, skills and qualities etc. required to enable you to benefit from, and succeed on the programme of study are

Following the Broadcast Journalism Training Council recommendations, we would normally expect applicants to exhibit three of more of the following:


  • good general knowledge, especially of current affairs;

  • evidence of key skills such as team working, problem solving, flexibility, tenacity, lateral thinking, enthusiasm, willingness, initiative;

  • basic competences in IT and keyboard skills;

  • some experience of broadcast production techniques such as sound and/or video, recording, and editing;

  • prior relevant experience in news, journalism or applied media;

  • knowledge of the British media or media in the applicant's native country;

  • strongly self-motivated.

6.3 The University will select non-standard entrants to the programme in the following ways

Consideration for entry will be given to non standard entrants who are unable to attend interview (particularly overseas students) and where possible alternative methods of assessment will be devised, such as telephone interview or email correspondence. Evidence such as experience in related media industries, or educational and professional achievements will also be considered, and use will be made of physical evidence where possible (e.g. recording of an applicant's performance to judge potential as a broadcaster).

Where entrants are able to demonstrate either through industry experience or professional practice an appropriate level of attainment consideration will be given to waiving degree specific attainment. This will be determined through the University's APCL/APEL process.

6.4 Use of Prior Credit (APCL/APEL): prior certificated credit or prior experiential credit may be used within the Programme in the following ways

To determine the stage of entry for the applicant.



To award credit.

Students with prior learning or experience may apply through the University's APCL/APEL process for credit against the course if the learning is relevant and of Masters level.



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