Key Stage eyfs unit 1: Who are we? [A&D] This unit explores ideas of what it is to be human and relates them to religious and other beliefs



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Awareness, Mystery and Value (AMV) 2011


Key Stage EYFS Unit 1: Who are we? [A&D]

This unit explores ideas of what it is to be human and relates them to religious and other beliefs

Some examples of how this AMV unit can link with early learning goals. it was written by Jon Lambert of North Petherton Community Primary School with updates by Dave Francis (Associate Adviser)




Personal, social and emotional development

Self-confidence and self-awareness

Examples of what children could do in RE

Children are confident to try new activities, and say why they like some activities more than others. They are confident to speak in a familiar group, will talk about their ideas, and will choose the resources they need for their chosen activities. They say when they do or don’t need help.

They are happy to visit local places of worship and to choose the resources they need to record their visit and can say whether they need help or not in completing any set tasks.

From a range of activities undertaken on the visit, they choose their favourites.



Managing feelings and behaviour

Examples of what children could do in RE

Children talk about how they and others show feelings, talk about their own and others’ behaviour, and its consequences, and know that some behaviour is unacceptable. They work as part of a group or class, and understand and follow the rules. They adjust their behaviour to different situations, and take changes of routine in their stride.


Using story as a stimulus, children talk about their ideas of what is fair and unfair, reflect upon the feelings, words and actions of characters in the story and decide what they would have done in a similar situation. They also reflect on love and concern shown in different religious stories and see that actions can have good or bad consequences.

Making relationships

Examples of what children could do in RE

Children play co-operatively, taking turns with others. They take account of one another’s ideas about how to organise their activity. They show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings, and form positive relationships with adults and other children.

Children join in with role plays based on religious stories, showing sensitivity towards other people’s needs and feelings.




Communication and language

Listening and attention

Examples of what children could do in RE

Children listen attentively in a range of situations. They listen to stories, accurately anticipating key events and respond to what they hear with relevant comments, questions or actions. They give their attention to what others say and respond appropriately, while engaged in another activity.

Using stories and songs from religion as a stimulus, children listen to each other’s ideas and ask questions about things they find interesting or puzzling.

Understanding


Examples of what children could do in RE

Children follow instructions involving several ideas or actions. They answer ‘how’ and ‘why’ questions about their experiences and in response to stories or events.

Having visited a local place of worship, children answer questions associated with the place, showing respect.

Using a religious celebration as a stimulus, they talk about the special events associated with the celebration.



Speaking

Examples of what children could do in RE

Children express themselves effectively, showing awareness of listeners’ needs. They use past, present and future forms accurately when talking about events that have happened or are to happen in the future. They develop their own narratives and explanations by connecting ideas or events.

Children identify and talk about the sequence of events in a story about love and forgiveness. They go on to say what might happen if the story continued.




Understanding the world

People and communities

Examples of what children could do in RE

Children talk about past and present events in their own lives and in the lives of family members. They know that other children don’t always enjoy the same things, and are sensitive to this. They know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions.


Children talk about important events such as the birth of a baby and how, for some people, this is celebrated by a religious ceremony.

Through artefacts, stories and music, they learn about important religious celebrations, how to handle a religious object sensitively and talk about why it might be special for some people, showing respect.



The world

Examples of what children could do in RE

Children know about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things. They talk about the features of their own immediate environment and how environments might vary from one another. They make observations of animals and plants and explain why some things occur, and talk about changes.

Using religious artefacts as a stimulus, children think about uses and meanings associated with the artefact.

They use different senses to explore foods used by different communities.

Using stories from religious traditions as a stimulus, children talk about the importance of valuing and looking after the environment.


Technology

Examples of what children could do in RE

Children recognise that a range of technology is used in places such as homes and schools. They select and use technology for particular purposes.

Children visit a place of worship and see how different technologies are used to communicate with believers and visitors.

Using appropriate software children find out about special events in religious traditions.



Key Stage EYFS Unit 1: Who are we? [A&D]

This unit explores ideas of what it is to be human and relates them to religious and other beliefs

Featured Religions / Beliefs

Areas of Enquiry

Christianity

AT 1: Learning ABOUT religion and belief

AT 2: Learning FROM religion and belief




A. Beliefs, teachings and sources



D. Identity and belonging






B. Practices and ways of life




E. Meaning, purpose and truth







C. Forms of expression




F. Values and commitments






Key Question: Who are we?


Supplementary Questions

  1. Who and what is special to me? (People, places, experiences, feelings, stories, objects, beliefs, values)

  2.  Who and what supports and guides us? (People, experiences, feelings, beliefs, values, ideas)

  3. What makes us joyful, peaceful, wonder, reflective, happy and sad? (Experiences, places, celebrations, stories, songs and, for some people, prayers)

  4. How might stories, prayers, songs, etc help us understand more about ourselves and ideas of God?

Resources

  • Photos of different people from magazines/council publications; different abilities, cultures etc.

  • Catalogues.

  • Children’s objects from home – photos of family & friends.

  • Lion Storyteller Bible – Bob Hartman.

  • The Great Big Book of Families – Mary Hoffman & Ros Asquith.

  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b015vf2g - Big and Small singing about what is important to them.

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=71hqRT9U0wg - If you’re happy and you know it song.

  • Gingerbread man outline

  • “Life” Maze.

  • Face outline

  • Becoming Me video story of creation, based on the story by Christopher Gilvan-Cartwright and Martin Boroson.

Additional resources

  • Stick Man – Julia Donaldson.

  • So Much – Trish Cooke & Helen Oxenbury.

  • You are Special - Max Lucado.




Learning Outside the Classroom

Expectations: C&D refers here to the focus areas of enquiry identified on the previous page

By the end of this sequence of learning:

All pupils: (work towards):

Most pupils (majority class expectation):

Some pupils:

A1 remember a Christian story and talk about it.

A1 remember a Christian story and talk about it.

A2 tell a Christian story and say some things that people believe.

D1 talk about things that happen to them.


D1 talk about things that happen to them.


D2 ask about what happens to others with respect for their feelings.

These statements are taken from the ‘Can-do’ levels published on the AMV website at: http://amv.somerset.gov.uk/




Key Question: Who are we?

Supplementary Question (a) Who and what is special to me?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning


Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 1

Pupils will:



  • consider who is special to them;

  • begin to recognise that everyone is different but still have people that are special to them.

1. Circle time: Read The Great Big Book of Families – use as a starter to ask who is special to the children (might not just be family members).

A whole class collage of different people could be created to start to think about diversity.



Guided activity: Children could create a collage of family and friends for display and discussion.

Circle time: After the activity – read Lion Storyteller’s Bible p.88 The Boy in the Temple ~ discuss the fact that for Jesus his parents were important but also the temple was important because that is where Christians believe he could be with his father [God].

[Alternatively, read Stick Man and then children could create a simple Family Tree Collage with photos.]




Pupils:

  • talk about their family and people who are special to them.

Children will need to bring photos of family and friends in to school to create the collage.

Some sensitivity might be required with looked after children & split families.

Additional resources:

Read So Much to get the idea of how special a new baby is to a family.


Lesson 2

Pupils will:


2. Guided activity / Challenge of the day:

Ask the children to create a background using watercolour paints of a place that is special to them, e.g. beach, bedroom, park, garden.

Next use Gingerbread man outline to create a person that looks like them (wool hair, fabric clothes).

Finally add pictures from catalogues of what they enjoy doing, e.g. sports equipment.



Circle time: Read the Lion Storyteller’s Bible p.118: The parable of the lost coin. Ask such questions as, ‘Why did the man sell everything that he had?’ ‘Why was it so special?’ ‘What is most precious to you?’


Pupils:

  • talk about what they enjoy, what they are good at and places they like to be.

Additional resources:

Read You are Special to encourage children to get the idea that they are unique and special.

You could also sing If you’re happy and you know it but children could add ideas for things that are unique to them e.g. ‘ride your scooter’.


Key Question: Who are we?

Supplementary Question (b) Who and what supports and guides us?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes


Lesson 3

Pupils will:



  • consider who and what helps them and us to make good decisions;

  • begin to recognise what the right thing to do is in different situations.

3. Challenge of the day: Ask the children to complete a maze – trying to take their pencil for a walk without taking it off or touching the lines.

Circle time: Link back to maze activity and discuss how it is difficult to make the right choice sometimes.

Read the Lion Storyteller’s Bible p.66 Jonah the Groaner (children can join in) and ask such questions as, ‘What helped Jonah make good decisions?’ ‘Are they always the easiest decisions?’ [This leads on to next activity.]



Circle time: Talk with the children about who helps us to make good decisions and create a list together (teachers, parents, carers, police, doctor etc.)

Pupils:

  • talk about times where they have had to make difficult decisions

Link to PSHE/EYFS people who help us.

If time allows, there is an opportunity here for children to dress up/role play being someone who helps.

Key Question: Who are we?

Supplementary Question (c) What makes us joyful, peaceful, wonder, reflective, happy and sad?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning


Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 4

Pupils will:



4. Circle time: Divide the room into two sides: one being HAPPY and the other SAD. Read out a list of situations that children might face in every day life and ask the children to choose which side of the room to go to, e.g. when I am hungry, when I fall over in the playground, when it is my birthday, when my granny comes to visit.

Ask the children to say why they have chosen ‘happy’ or ‘sad’.



Challenge of the day: Ask the children to make a happy/sad face. Use the face outline [with ready-made features drawn on, apart from the mouth.]

Encourage the children to use the cut-out moon shapes below and attach a split pin in the middle to create the mouth, so that a happy or sad face can be made. [Children could use this to help them discuss how they feel about different situations.]



Pupils:

  • talk about what makes them happy or sad.

The list of happy/sad moments will need to take into account individual circumstances of the class.

Key Question: Who are we?

Supplementary Question (d) How might stories, prayers, songs, etc help us understand more about ourselves and ideas of God?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning


Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 5

Pupils will:



  • experience a number of stories / songs / prayers from different faiths;

  • recognise the variety of life on earth and begin to think, discuss and wonder where it came from.

5. Circle time: Read the Lion Storyteller’s Bible p.8 In the Beginning [explain that Christians believe that God made the world and everything in it but many people believe other things.]

Opportunity for drama: assign different groups of children different roles e.g. ‘climbing things’, ‘jumping things’, ‘splashing things’.



Challenge of the day: Give the children two headings, e.g. ‘flying things’ and ‘splashing things’ and a variety of pictures. Encourage them to sort the pictures in the right category.

Show the short Becoming Me video and ask the children how they think we were made and where we come from. Did they think there was anything interesting/puzzling about the video?



Pupils:

  • talk about themselves;

  • remember a Christian story and talk about it.




Links to science/maths – grouping different things based on their properties.

Additional ideas: If appropriate to the school, sing ‘He’s got the whole world in his hands’

Children could also experience a variety of songs/prayers from different faiths and discuss how it makes them feel.


Key Question: Who are we?


Supplementary Question (d) How might stories, prayers, songs, etc help us understand more about ourselves and ideas of God?

Learning objectives

Suggested activities for teaching and learning

Outcomes

References and notes

Lesson 6

Pupils will:



  • explore emotions, what is important and names.

6. For further activities, see, e.g., ‘What do Muslims want to whisper and shout?’ in RE Today: RE Ideas: God, pages 2-6.








Mouths

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