King, Parks, and X 10th grade English Class Unit Objectives



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Heidi E Johnson

Secondary Methods

April 30, 2007

Unit Overview Revised

King, Parks, and X

10th grade English Class



Unit Objectives:

  1. Students will be able to discuss the significance of Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, and Malcom X in America’s history.

  2. Students will be able to identify analogies and metaphors in speeches.

  3. Students will be able to analyze the effectiveness of a speech, a poem, and a eulogy.

  4. Students will be able to write a creative non-fiction piece.

  5. Students will be able to use the speaking skills they acquired earlier in the year to share their stories with their classmates.


Standards:

I. Reading and Literature

B. Vocabulary Expansion

Standard: The student will apply a variety of strategies to expand vocabulary.

3. Identify and analyze analogies.

C. Comprehension

Standard: The student will understand the meaning of informational, expository or

persuasive tests, using a variety of strategies and will demonstrate literal, interpretive, inferential and evaluative comprehension.

4. Analyze a variety of nonfiction materials selected from journals, essays,

speeches, biographies and auto biographies.

II. Writing

A. Types of Writing



Standard: The student will write in narrative, expository, descriptive, persuasive

and critical modes.

1. Plan, organize and compose narrative, expository, descriptive,

persuasive, critical and research writing to address a specific audience and purpose.

III. Speaking, Listening and Viewing

A. Speaking and Listening


Standard: The student will demonstrate understanding and communicate

effectively through listening and speaking.

2. Deliver a speech in a logical manner using grammatically correct

language, including vocabulary appropriate to the topic, audience and purpose.

C. Media Literacy


Standard: The student will critically analyze information found in electronic and

print media, and will use a variety of these sources to learn about a topic and

represent ideas.

3. Evaluate the source’s point of view, intended audience and authority.

4. Determine whether the evidence in a selection is appropriate, adequate

and accurate.


Key Questions Answered in Unit:

  1. How did the acts of these three leaders in the Civil Rights Movement impact your life today?

  2. How does reading about these three political figures help me understand America’s history and make predictions about your future?

  3. How does writing about your cultural past/struggles benefit you?


Previous Knowledge:

  1. Students will have learned about the Civil Rights Act in their History classes.

  2. Students will know who Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, and Malcom X are.

  3. Students will know how to recognize poetry from prose and know what each of those terms mean.


Declarative Knowledge:

  1. Students will learn about the effectiveness of Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcom X’s speeches.

  2. Students will learn about the impact of these three Civil Rights leaders on America’s history.

  3. Students will learn how literature of the time was just as important as leaders.


Procedural Knowledge:

  1. Students will learn how to analyze literature and speeches based on appropriateness for audience and topic.

  2. Students will learn how to connect the literature of the time to the leaders of the time.


  3. Students will learn how to write a creative non-fiction piece so they can share at the end of the semester.


Connections between objectives, standards, and questions:

I chose to focus on the bigger question of how these three leaders and their texts affect the students’ lives today because these three leaders have changed America drastically to the point where people are not being brought up not knowing a thing about racism. The objectives and standards mention strictly parts of the unit plan like being able to give a speech, distinguish between metaphor and allegory, and analyze the effectiveness of a piece of media or literature. I specifically made the questions as higher level thinking questions because I wanted a different answer from each student. I think, when talking about culture, that there will be different perspectives from each student which, in turn, will create a great classroom dynamic for discussion.



Timeline of Unit Plan:


Day 1

Monday



  • Timeline of Civil Rights Movement

  • Overview of Unit

  • Discussion of events or people students think were crucial to this movement

Day 2

Tuesday


  • Jigsaw biographies of Malcom X, Martin Luther King Jr., and Rosa Parks
  • Is there a connection with these three people deeper than just being leaders of the civil rights movement?


  • What do you think would have happened if one of these three people didn’t get involved in the Civil Rights Movement at all?

Day 3

Wednesday



  • Read “Letter from Birmingham Jail” and discuss the effectiveness of the letter

Day 4

Thursday


  • Read and watch Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech

  • How is the speech effective just by reading it?

  • Does the speech become more powerful when watching it? Why or why not?

  • Read and listen to Malcom X’s “The Ballot or the Bullet” speech

  • What is the difference between these speeches? Which one is more effective to you?

Day 5

Friday


  • Review Rosa Parks’ act on the bus

  • Review the arrest documents of Rosa Parks and discuss the moral implications of that arrest.

  • Was it right that Parks was arrested?

  • How did this affect the Civil Rights Movement?

  • Read poems about Rosa Parks written by Rita Dove

  • Do these poems relate to Rosa’s situation?

Day 6

Monday


  • In-class essay about first 5 days

  • Talk about the elements of creative non-fiction

  • Read Patricia Hampl’s “Red Sky in the Morning”

  • Assign Cultural Story assignment

Day 7

Tuesday


  • Students will write their stories the entire time while I walk around, answer questions, and help where needed. This will give me time to help my ELL students.

Day 8

Wednesday



  • Students will brainstorm descriptive words in order to increase their vocabulary for their stories

  • Continue writing and turn in rough drafts by the end of the class

Day 9

Thursday


  • I will return the rough drafts

  • Students will edit and turn in final drafts at end of class

Day 10

Friday


  • In their Jigsaw groups, students will share their cultural stories using correct speech format


Cultural Connections:

This entire Unit Plan is basically a cultural connection unit. It is beginning by looking at the African American culture with Martin Luther King Jr., Malcom X, and Rosa Parks. After discussing their impact, students are going to look at their own culture and analyze it. Students will write a story about their cultural story or struggle and share that with the class so all of us will learn about each other’s cultures.


Literacy Strategies:

This entire unit includes literacy strategies from reading to speaking, to writing. The students will be engaged daily in literacy and, after having written their stories, will be promoting literacy to younger students.

Developmental Appropriateness:

I think this unit is appropriate for my class because we will be doing most of the reading in class so that I will be able to help my ELL students and keep my ADHD students busy during the full ninety minutes of each class. Also, these readings are not that difficult to read and we will be watching or listening to the majority of them. This will help the students catch on to metaphors and the meaning of the texts. For the writing, I am having the students do the majority of it in the classroom for many reasons: it allows me to help them as needed, some students may not have access to a computer at home, and students can help each other with their writing.

Technology:

The students and I will use multiple forms of technology within this unit plan. I will be showing the students a video of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, they will be listening to Malcom X’s speech, and they will be using Microsoft Word to type their cultural stories. Also, I will be using the overhead when we read “Letter from Birmingham Jail” in order to show analysis with that text. I will also be using the overhead when we read the poems about Rosa Parks. I will be using Microsoft PowerPoint to present the timeline of the Civil Rights movement.


Service Learning:

After the students write their cultural stories, we will go to the elementary school and the students will read their stories to third and fourth graders. This will not only give my students the chance to speak in front of people but it will hopefully inspire the third and fourth graders to continue reading and writing in order to succeed in the future. After my students read, they will be put in a group with three or four elementary school students so the third and fourth graders can ask them questions about high school or how they have succeeded. This will not only help the third and fourth graders to be inspired to keep working, it will allow my students to look at their lives and acknowledge their strengths and their success in school.



Unit Evaluation:

The main part of the evaluation will be the cultural story. I will use the Six Traits of Writing rubric to grade these stories and also an evaluation of the presentation. However, there will be periodic assignments that will be handed in for evaluation.



Lesson Number

Type of Assignment

Total Points

2


5-minute essay

10

5

Poem analysis

15

6

In-class essay

25

8

Rough draft of cultural story

10

9

Final draft of cultural story

30

10

Presentation of story

10


Unit Assessment:

The majority of the assessment will be done by listening in on discussions and making sure each student participates in these discussions. The students will be receiving final participation points at the end of the unit (15 points). Within the Jigsaw groups, the group leader needs to make sure everyone contributes to the group and the recorder needs to take notes of the discussion. My observations will be the formative assessment for the unit.


Materials and Resources

  • On the Bus with Rosa Parks by Rita Dove

  • “Letter from Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King Jr.

  • “The Ballot or the Bullet” by Malcom X

  • Arrest documents from Rosa Parks’ arrest

  • “Red Sky in the Morning” by Patricia Hampl

  • PowerPoint timeline of Civil Rights Movement

  • Biographies of Malcom X, Rosa Parks, and Martin Luther King Jr.

  • Daybreak of Freedom by Stewart Burns
  • Overheads of Dove’s poems and “Letter from Birmingham Jail”

Heidi E Johnson 10th Grade English

Secondary Methods Lesson #5
Objectives:


  1. Students will be able to analyze the jail records of Rosa Parks.

  2. Students will be able to analyze a poem and connect it to Rosa Parks’ incident.

Standards:

I. Reading and Literature

C. Comprehension

Standard: The student will understand the meaning of informational, expository or persuasive texts, using a variety of strategies and will demonstrate literal, interpretive, inferential, and evaluative comprehension.

4. Analyze a variety of nonfiction materials selected from journals, essays, speeches, biographies, and autobiographies.

D. Literature

Standard: The student will actively engage in the reading process and read, understand, respond to, analyze, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate a wise variety of fiction, poetic, and nonfiction texts.

8. Analyze classic and contemporary poems for poetic devices.



Materials and Resources:

  • Copies of interview with Rosa Parks

Burns, Stewart. Daybreak of Freedom: The Montgomery Bus Boycott. Chapel Hill: The

University of North Carolina Press, 1997.




  • Copies of the poem “Rosa” by Rita Dove

Dove, Rita. “Rosa.” On the Bus with Rosa Parks: Poems. New York: W.W. Norton &

Company, 1999.




  • Packets of Rosa Parks’ arrest documents

  • Overheads of the arrest documents

  • Overhead projector

  • Overhead pens

Activating Students’ Prior Knowledge:

In the beginning of the class, I will have the students have the students discuss in groups what they remember about Rosa Parks from the first lecture on the Civil Rights Movement. After this, I will have each group share with the class. This will activate their previous knowledge of Rosa Parks’ involvement in the Civil Rights Movement and allow them to analyze the jail records and poem.


Purpose:

I will tell the students that Rosa Parks was one of the only women involved in the Civil Rights Movement and that is significant because she didn’t really want to be an active part of it but ended up making a statement just because she was tired and didn’t want to stand on the bus.



Anticipatory Set:

I will begin the class by asking my students to close their eyes and then I will say, “Imagine you just got done with an extremely difficult day at work and you are on your way home to cook a quick dinner and then go to bed. Right when you get on the bus, there is an empty seat and you take it because you can. Unfortunately, at the next stop, a man gets on the bus, comes over to you, and says, ‘Get out of my seat.’ You are so tired and your feet hurt so bad that you look at him and say, ‘No, I am tired.’ Right after this, you get arrested. Now, open your eyes and please write your reaction in your notebook.”


Methods/Strategies Used and Rationale:

  1. Reading Strategies: Students will be using the Post-it note method of annotating the interview with Rosa Parks. This will allow them to go back to certain parts and review what they thought at the time and, maybe, change their mind after thinking about is for a little bit.

  2. Critical Thinking: Students will be engaging in the analysis portion of Bloom’s Taxonomy which will allow them to make connections from jail records and poetry to the Civil Rights Movement.

Chronology:

7:55-8:00: I will begin the class by asking my students to close their eyes and then I will say, “Imagine you just got done with an extremely difficult day at work and you are on your way home to cook a quick dinner and then go to bed. Right when you get on the bus, there is an empty seat and you take it because you can. Unfortunately, at the next stop, a man gets on the bus, comes over to you, and says, ‘Get out of my seat.’ You are so tired and your feet hurt so bad that you look at him and say, ‘No, I am tired.’ Right after this, you get arrested. Now, open your eyes and please write your reaction in your notebook.” Students will then write their reactions in their notebooks for 3 minutes.


8:00-8:05: I will then ask students, “Please turn to the person next to you and discuss what you remember about Rosa Parks and the Civil Rights Movement.” After they talk for 3 minutes, each group will share their answers with the class.

8:05-8:20: I will hand out the interview with Rosa Parks and say, “Please read this interview with Rosa Parks and place sticky notes on at least 5 parts that you think are important.”

8:20-8:25: “Ok, class, attention up here please. I need everyone to come up and write the one part of the interview that you thought was most important. If someone has already written the one you wanted to write on the board, please write another one.”

8:25-8:30: We will discuss the points written on the board and students will explain why they put what they did on the board. This will force them to explain their decision in detail which is another part of higher level thinking.

8:30-8:40: I will hand out the packet of the arrest documents and the worksheet with questions on it and say, “I am handing around copies of Rosa Parks’ arrest documents and a worksheet. I want you to look through these documents and answer the questions on the worksheet that is coming around as well. Go ahead and begin.” Students will take the ten minutes to go through the arrest documents. Some of the questions may seem very base level but this is probably the first time my students have seen actual arrest records. The last two questions are moving toward the higher level thinking stage.

8:40-8:45: Students will take a break and I will ask the students who are still in the classroom to help me move the inside tables flush against the outside tables and move the chairs behind the desks. This will be set up for a “courtroom debate” setting. I will also ask one of my ELL students and two of my upper level students to be the judges on a panel.


Classroom Set-up

Desk Blackboard









8:45-8:50: “Welcome back. We are going to be doing a mock debate. The right side of the room will be representing the police and the bus driver. The left side of the room will be representing Rosa Parks’ supporters. Please look through the interview and the arrest documents again and make sure you know what happened so you can take on your role effectively. These three students will be the panel of judges and will decide whether or not the arrest should have happened. I will give you until 8:50 to look through everything and make sure you know your opinion. You may work with people who are taking the same role as you. Go ahead and begin.” I will then give the judges their sheet of paper and tell them I expect each one of them to be an equal participant in this debate.

8:50-9:10: “Alright, class, now that everyone has their opinions prepared, we will begin the debate. I will be grading you on this so each person needs to participate. If you don’t participate, I won’t know if you understood the content and you will get no points. I would rather have you participate and be incorrect than not participate at all. The judges will be in charge of the debate so follow what they say. Alright, we can begin.” I will not participate in any of this. It doesn’t really matter if it doesn’t go as smoothly as I want. This gives the students an opportunity to take control of their own success.


9:10-9:15: I will end the discussion at this point and say, “Thank you for your participation in that discussion. Judges, please deliberate for a moment and let us know what you decided.” We will wait for a minute and see what the judges decided. I will then ask my class, “What was the purpose of that debate? What did you learn?” Students will share their answers with the class.

9:15-9:17: “Ok, thank you for your answers. Please move the tables back to their original position and take your seats. We have one more thing to do before we are done for the day.” Students will then move back to their seats.

9:17-9:23: I will hand out the poem worksheet with the poem analysis assignment and say, “Here is a poem written by Rita Dove about Rosa Parks. You will be doing a minimum of a 2 page analysis paper on this poem. It doesn’t have to be strictly based on the poem; it can involve any of the outside information we discussed but it must connect back to the poem. For the rest of the time, you will read the poem and then turn to the person next to you and talk about it. This way, you will be able to think out loud and have another opinion to think about. Go ahead and begin.”

9:23-9:25: “Ok, class, thank you for your participation today. Your poetry analyses will be due on Monday. Remember to read it over from the back to the front so you don’t miss any grammatical errors. On Monday, I will need you to hand in the arrest document worksheet with your poem analysis. Have a great weekend!”

Modifications Required:

I may have to help my ELL, BD, and LD students (Jared, Jason, Jessica, Heidi, Nicole, Ryan, Davie, Krystal, Mike, Rudy, Shakri, and Shea) with the arrest records worksheet because the writing on the arrest records is a little difficult to read so it may discourage these students. If I mingle around the room while they are working on this, I will be able to monitor their work and help if necessary. Also, I will tell my ELL students that they have to have at least 1 page for their poem analysis because it may be a little more difficult for them to write about this. In their analyses, I will be looking for more content than grammatical errors.


Accommodations Needed:

The interview will be good for the oral/text learners. They will be able to retain the information from the interview. The arrest documents will be good for the visual learners. They will get to see what the police thought in a shorter description and see a visual of where Parks was sitting on the bus. The debate will be good for the kinesthetic learners because they will be able to take on a role and discuss using what they know about the person they are portraying. Hopefully, somewhere in this lesson, each student will find something they connect to which will help them learn better.



Assessment:

I will be collecting the arrest document worksheet and poem analysis on the Monday after I assign this. We will have already talked about poem analyses earlier in the year and they will have already done one analysis so this one should be fine. It is only worth 15 points so it will be graded on content and the connection of Parks’ incident to the poem. I will be giving points to the students for their participation in the discussion in class. I will also be walking around the class while the students are doing their arrest document worksheet and the discussion about the poem so I can assess their understanding of the assignments.











Name:­­___________________________

Arrest Documents Worksheet

Please answer the questions according to what you see on the 4 documents in the packet.



  1. Who was arrested?



  1. Who arrested her?



  1. When and where was she arrested?



  1. Who signed the warrant for her arrest?


  1. What was the complaint?


  1. Does anything surprise you about the arrest? The arrest records?




  1. What else do you want to know about the arrest that the records don’t tell you?


Judges’ Sheet
Begin by asking the right side of the room for their opinion on the arrest of Rosa Parks.

Add any questions you feel are necessary.


Next, ask the left side of the room for their opinion of the arrest of Rosa Parks.

Add any questions you feel are necessary.


Open the floor for debate. Make sure, if it gets out of hand, that you keep order in the classroom. If no one is talking, you may ask questions or suggest people to speak.
Notes:

Read the following poem and then write an analysis of this poem. It must be at least 2 pages long, 12 point font, double spaced. If you are writing it, I want it to be 2 notebook pages back and front. This is due on Monday.



Rosa
How she sat there,

the time right inside a place

so wrong it was ready.
That trim name with

its dream of a bench

to rest on. Her sensible coat.
Doing nothing was the doing:

the clean flame of her gaze

carved by a camera flash.
How she stood up

when they bent down to retrieve

her purse. That courtesy.

Dove, Rita. “Rosa.” On the Bus with Rosa Parks: Poems. New York: W.W. Norton &


Company, 1999.





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