Kompetenzorientierte Jahresplanung Prime Time 5



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Kompetenzorientierte Jahresplanung Prime Time 5





Units

Skills

Descriptors

September

Unit 1: The world speaks English

Listening

Interview: Not the only show in town (p. 9)



Can generally follow the main points of extended discussion around him/her, […]. (B1)



Radio show: Just another pizza order in Manhattan (p. 10)

Can keep up with an animated conversation between native speakers. (B2)

Speaking

Discussion: How do you use English? / Use of foreign languages (p. 8)


Can express his/her thoughts about abstract or cultural topics such as music, films […]. (B1)



Talk: Where does English come from? (p. 12)

Can give a prepared straightforward presentation on a familiar topic […]. (B1)


Reading

Quiz: The role of English (pp. 6–7)


Can find and understand relevant information in everyday material […]. (B1)



Article: English as a global language (p. 9)


Can recognise significant points in straightforward newspaper articles on familiar subjects. (B1)

Article: The language school (p. 12)

Can write accounts of experiences, describing feelings and reactions in simple connected text. (B1)

Writing

Poster: A poster for a language school (p. 10)



Can write notes […] getting across comprehensibly the points he/she feels are important. (B1)



Text: Foreign languages – what for? (p. 13)


Can summarise, report and give his/her opinion about accumulated factual information on familiar routine and non-routine matters within his field with some confidence. (B1)

Language in Use

Passive constructions (p. 11, p. 13)










Units

Skills

Descriptors

October

Unit 2: Identities

Listening

Story: Now that’s what I call living! (p. 22)


Can take notes as a list of key points during a straightforward lecture […]. (B1)



Speaking

Talk: Describing pictures (p. 14)


Can give a simple description or presentation of people […]. (A2)



Talk: What’s in a name? (p. 15)

Can describe people, places and possessions in simple terms. (A2)

Talk: Your turn – Your own opinion (p. 15)

Can briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions, plans and actions. (B1)

Conversation: Talking about personal qualities (p. 17)

Can participate in short conversations in routine contexts on topics of interest. (A2)

Talk: You are what you like (p. 17)



Can describe everyday aspects of his environment e.g. people, places, a job or study experience. (A2)

Talk: Talking about Jimmy (p. 23)

Can relate the plot of a book or film and describe his/her reactions. (B1)

Talk: One of your classmates (p. 28)

Can describe people, places and possessions in simple terms. (A2)

Reading

Questionnaire: A personality questionnaire (p. 16)



Can understand short, simple texts on familiar matters of a concrete type which consist of high frequency everyday or job-related language. (A2)



Poem: Let no one steal your dreams


Can understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract topics […]. (B2)

Story: Now that’s what I call living! (pp. 21–22)

Can scan longer texts in order to locate desired information […]. (B1)

Article: Facebook – an introduction (pp. 24–25)

Can recognise significant points in straightforward newspaper articles on familiar subjects. (B1)

Writing

Text: Your plans are part of you (p. 19)

Can write short, simple imaginary biographies and simple poems about people. (A2)



Formal letter: A letter to a school abroad (p. 19)

Can write letters […] highlighting the personal significance of events and experiences […]. (B2)

Story: Let no one steal your dreams (p. 20)


Can narrate a story. (B1)

Personal web page: Presenting yourself (p. 25)

Can write about everyday aspects of his environment e.g. people, places, a job or study experience […]. (A2)

Story: The taxi driver (p. 27)

Can narrate a story. (B1)

Forum posting: Real friends? (p. 28)

Can write personal letters giving news and expressing thoughts about abstract or cultural topics such as music, films. (B1)

Language in Use

Talking about the future (pp. 18–19, p. 28)






Present and past forms (pp. 26–27, p. 29)








Units__Skills__Descriptors__November'>Units

Skills

Descriptors

November

Unit 3: Australia

Listening

Dialogue: Walkabout (p. 33)


Can generally follow the main points of extended discussion around him/her, provided speech is clearly articulated in standard dialect. (B1)



Dialogue: Understanding Angela (p. 35)

Can take notes as a list of key points […]. (B1)

Listening Skills: Taking notes (p. 37)

Can take notes during a lecture, which are precise enough for his/her own use at a later date, provided the topic is within his/her field of interest and the talk is clear and well structured. (B1)

Speaking

Australia Quiz (p. 30)


Can find out and pass on straightforward factual information. (B1)


Discussion: Aspects of Australia (p. 31)


Can give or seek personal views and opinions in discussing topics of interest. (B1)

Story: The Aboriginal boy (p. 33)

Can narrate a story. (B1)

Talk: A talk about Australia (p. 43)

Can briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions, plans and actions. (B1)

Discussion: Which trip is better? (p. 43)

Can make his/her opinions and reactions understood as regards […] practical questions of where to go, what to do, how to organise an event (e.g. an outing). (B1)

Reading

Story: Walkabout (p. 32)


Can scan longer texts in order to locate desired information, and gather information from different parts of a text […]. (B1)



Story: Angela (pp. 34–35)

Can read straightforward […] texts on subjects related to his/her field and interest with a satisfactory level of comprehension. (B1)

Summary: Angela (p. 36)

Can summarise the plot and sequence of events in a film or play. (B2)

Internet project: The Great Barrier Reef (p. 37)


Can collate short pieces of information from several sources and summarise them for somebody else. (B1)

Internet article: First time in “Oz” (p. 38)

Can recognise significant points in straightforward newspaper articles on familiar subjects. (B1)

Writing

Letter to an agony aunt: Friends and money (p. 36)


Can write letters conveying degrees of emotion and highlighting the personal significance of events and experiences […]. (B2)



Text: That’s how discrimination works (p. 43)

Can write very brief, reports to a standard conventionalised format, which pass on routine factual information and state reasons for actions. (B1)

Language in Use

Characterization (p. 33)






Using let, make and have (pp. 38–39)




Defining and non-defining relative clauses (pp. 40–41)



Word formation: prefixes (p. 42)











Units__Skills__Descriptors__January'>Units

Skills

Descriptors

December

Unit 4: Media-mad

Listening

Interviews: Interviews about the use of media (p. 58)


Can understand a large part of many […] programmes on topics of personal interest such as interviews, […] when the delivery is […] and clear. (B1)



Speaking

Discussion: A day full of media (p. 44)


Can describe […] habits and routines, past activities and personal experiences. (A2)



Talk: Everywhere and at any time (p. 45)

Can describe everyday aspects of his environment e.g. people, places, a job or study experience. (A2)

Talk: My favourite TV programme (p. 49)

Can explain what he/she likes or dislikes about something. (A2)

Discussion: Docusoaps (p. 50)


Can enter […] into conversation of familiar topics, express personal opinions and exchange information on topics that are familiar, of personal interest or pertinent to everyday life […]. (B1)

Role play: What do you think about the show? (p. 50)

Can express his/her thoughts about abstract or cultural topics such as music, films. Can explain why something is a problem. (B1)

Talk: Talking about reviews (p. 51)

Can briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions, plans and actions. (B1)

Arguing politely (pp. 54–55)

Can initiate, maintain and close simple face-to-face conversation on topics that are familiar or of personal interest. (B1)

Reading

Film script: The Truman show (pp. 46–47)


Can summarise […] imaginative texts, commenting on and discussing contrasting points of view and the main themes. (B2)



Reading skills: Scanning and skimming (p. 48)

Can scan […] texts in order to locate desired information, and gather information from different parts of a text […]. (B1)

Internet project: Use more than one source (p. 48)


Can collate short pieces of information from several sources and summarise them for somebody else. (B1)

Article: Docusoaps (p. 49)

Can read straightforward factual texts on subjects related to his/her field and interest with a satisfactory level of comprehension. (B1)

Movie review (p. 51)

Can find and understand relevant information in everyday material, such as letters, brochures and short official documents. (B1)

Writing

Letter to the editor: Giving your opinion on a TV programme (p. 50)


Can write an essay or report […] giving reasons in support of or against a particular point of view […]. (B2)



Text: Disagreeing politely (p. 58)

Is aware of the salient politeness conventions and acts appropriately. (B1)

Language in Use

Organising vocabulary in a word web (p. 45)






Improving texts with participle constructions (pp. 52–53, p. 59)




How to argue politely (pp. 54–55)


Simple and progressive forms (pp. 56–57, p. 59)





Stative and dynamic verbs (pp. 56–57)










Units__Skills__Descriptors__April'>Units__Skills__Descriptors__March'>Units

Skills

Descriptors

January

Unit 5: Politics

Listening

Talk: How American democracy began (p. 69)


Can follow in outline straightforward short talks on familiar topics provided these are delivered in clearly articulated standard speech. (B1)



Speaking

Talk: From the people for the people (p. 60)


Can give straightforward descriptions on a variety of familiar subjects […]. (B1)



Talk: British attitudes towards the European Union (p. 67)

Can briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions, plans and actions. (B1)

Project: A political survey at school (p. 67)


Can use a prepared questionnaire to carry out a structured interview, with some spontaneous follow up questions. (B1)

Research activity: A famous monument (p. 71)

Can give a prepared straightforward presentation on a familiar topic within his/her field which is clear enough to be followed without difficulty most of the time, and in which the main points are explained with reasonable precision. (B1)

Discussion: The role of a pupils’ representative (p. 72)

Can give or seek personal views and opinions in discussing topics of interest. (B1)

Reading

Quiz: Politics in the UK (p. 62)


Can find and understand relevant information in everyday material […]. (B1)



Article: A history of Parliament (pp. 62–63)

Can […] gather information from different parts of a text […] to fulfil a specific task. (B1)

Article: The system of government in the UK (pp. 63–64)

Can read straightforward factual texts on subjects related to his/her field and interest with a satisfactory level of comprehension. (B1)

Article: How an MP is elected (p. 64)


Can recognise significant points in straightforward […] articles on familiar subjects. (B1)

Article: Different parliaments for different people (p. 65)

Can […] gather information […] from different texts in order to fulfil a specific task. (B1)

Diagrams: The American government (pp. 70–71)

Can collate short pieces of information from several sources and summarise them for somebody else. (B1)

Article: UK 2005 election statistics (pp. 72–73)

Can scan […] texts in order to locate desired information […]. (B1)

Writing

Writing skills: Pro and con texts (p. 68)


Can write short, simple essays on topics of interest. (B1)



Research activity: The current U.S. President (p. 71)

Can synthesise information and arguments from a number of sources. (B2)

Article: The British system of government (p. 72)

Can collate short pieces of information from several sources and summarise them for somebody else. (B1)

Language in Use

Comparison and contrast (p. 66)





Talking about surveys and graphs (p. 67, p. 73)










Units

Skills

Descriptors

February

Unit 6: Strange realities

Listening

Discussion: Reality shows


Can generally follow the main points of extended discussion around him/her, provided speech is clearly articulated in standard dialect. (B1)



Speaking

Discussion: It is all in the eye of the beholder (p. 74)


Can express his/her thoughts about abstract or cultural topics such as music, films […]. (B1)



Talk: Strange realities and art (p. 83)

Can give straightforward descriptions on a variety of […] subjects within his field of interest. (B1)

Presentation: Surreal works of art (p. 83)

Can give a prepared straightforward presentation on a familiar topic within his/her field which is clear enough to be followed without difficulty most of the time, and in which the main points are explained with reasonable precision. (B1)


Discussion: A talk show in class (p. 85)

Can take part in routine formal discussion of familiar subjects […]. (B1)

Reading

Story: Going home (pp. 76–77)


Can summarise the plot and sequence of events […]. (B2)



Article: The Aboriginal spiritual world (p. 77)

Can read straightforward factual texts on subjects related to his/her field and interest with a satisfactory level of comprehension. (B1)

Story: Deportation at breakfast (pp. 79–80)

Can scan longer texts in order to locate desired information […] in order to fulfil a specific task. (B1)

Story: Short stories (p. 81)

Can scan longer texts in order to locate desired information […] in order to fulfil a specific task. (B1)

Writing

Article: A weird story (p. 75)


Can write a description of an event […] – real or imagined. (B1)



Story writing (p. 78)

Can narrate a story. (B1)

Story: What happened in the end? (p. 80)


Can write straightforward connected text on topics, which are familiar, or of personal interest. (B1)

Story: A short story (p. 85)

Can write a description of an event […] – real or imagined. (B1)

Language in Use

Modal verbs (p. 84)






Word formation (p. 85)










Units

Skills

Descriptors

March

Unit 7: Human rights

Listening

News report: Human rights in Tibet (p. 89)


Can understand the main points of radio news bulletins […] delivered relatively slowly and clearly. (B1)



Dialogue: Who should respect whom? (p. 93)

Is aware of the salient politeness conventions and acts appropriately. (B1)

Discussion: Another hero (p. 96)


Can understand the information content of the majority of recorded or broadcast audio material on topics of personal interest delivered in clear standard speech. (B1)

Speaking

Talk: Values as the basis of human rights (p. 87)


Can briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions […]. (B1)



Role play: Showing tolerance and respect (p. 93)

Is aware of the salient politeness conventions and acts appropriately. (B1)

Dialogue: Show everyday courage and support (p. 94)

Can express him or herself appropriately in situations […]. (B2)

Reading

Article: The concept of dignity (p. 88)


Can recognise significant points in straightforward […] articles on familiar subjects. (B1)



Internet project: The situation in Tibet at present (p. 89)

Can collate short pieces of information from several sources […]. (B1)

Article: Different aspects of human rights (p. 90)

Can summarise extracts from news items, interviews or documentaries containing opinions, argument and discussion. (B2)


Article: The power of pictures (p. 95)

Can understand articles and reports concerned with contemporary problems […]. (B2)

Writing

Formal letter: Letter of complaint to a clothes company (p. 94)


Can write letters conveying degrees of emotion and highlighting the personal significance of events and experiences […]. (B2)



Internet project: The mean girl (p. 95)

Can synthesise information and arguments from a number of sources. (B2)

Formal letter: Letter of complaint to a travel company (p. 97)

Can write […] letters describing experiences, feelings and events in some detail. (B1)

Language in Use

Gerunds and infinitives (pp. 91–93, p. 96, p. 97)












Units

Skills

Descriptors

April

Unit 8: Music

Listening

Dialogue: Charlie’s video blog (p. 102)

Can generally follow the main points of extended discussion around him/her, provided speech is clearly articulated in standard dialect. (B1)



Speaking

Discussion: What music means to you (p. 99)


Can express his/her thoughts about abstract or cultural topics such as music, films […]. (B1)



Discussion: What does the web mean to DIY musicians? (p. 102)

Can compare and contrast alternatives, discussing what to do, where to go, who or which to choose etc. (B1)

Talk: Interpreting song lyrics (pp. 104–105)

Can briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions, plans and actions. (B1)

Internet project: Protest songs (p. 105)

Can collate short pieces of information from several sources and summarise them for somebody else. (B1)

Presentation: A history of rock and pop music (p. 106)

Can give a prepared straightforward presentation on a familiar topic within his/her field which is clear enough to be followed without difficulty most of the time, and in which the main points are explained with reasonable precision. (B1)


Presentation: Experience the sound (p. 108)

Can give straightforward descriptions on a variety of familiar subjects within his field of interest. (B1)

Discussion: MP3 players – Music in your ears (p. 111)

Can express belief, opinion, agreement and disagreement politely. (B1)

Reading

Article: Producing your own music (pp. 100–101)


Can scan longer texts in order to locate desired information, and gather information from different parts of a text […] in order to fulfil a specific task. (B1)



Song lyrics: Two protest songs (pp. 103–104)

Can understand the description of events, feelings and wishes […]. (B1)

Article: A history of rock and pop music (pp. 106–108)

Can recognise significant points in straightforward […] articles on familiar subjects. (B1)

Article: More teens moving away from CDs (p. 109)

Can recognise the line of argument in the treatment of the issue presented, though not necessarily in detail. (B1)

Writing

Article: Present and future of music genres (p. 108)


Can write short, simple essays on topics of interest. (B1)



Letter to the editor: File-sharing sites on the internet (p. 111)

Can produce simple connected text on topics, which are familiar, or of personal interest. (B1)

Language in Use

Describing music (p. 105)






Adjectives and adverbs of manner and degree (pp. 110–111)










Units

Skills

Descriptors

May

Unit 9: Jobs

Listening

Dialogue: Marco’s, Pete’s and Naomi’s work experience (p. 116)


Can generally follow the main points of extended discussion around him/her, provided speech is clearly articulated in standard dialect. (B1)



Dialogue: Just you wait!

Can understand the information content of […] recorded or broadcast audio material on topics of personal interest delivered in clear standard speech. (B1)


Dialogue: A job in a sports shop (p. 122)

Can take notes […], which are precise enough for his/her own use at a later date, provided […] the talk is clear and well structured. (B1)

Dialogues: Two job interviews (p. 124)

Is aware of […] the most significant differences between the customs, usages [and] attitudes […] prevalent in the community concerned and those of his or her own. (B1)

Speaking

Talk: The world of work (p. 112)


Can give straightforward descriptions on a variety of familiar subjects […]. (B1)



Talk: Unusual jobs (p. 113)

Can briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions, plans and actions. (B1)

Presentation: My biz (p. 116)

Can give a […] presentation, […] giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options. (B2)

Presentation: Competition for jobs (p. 121)

Can give a prepared straightforward presentation on a familiar topic within his/her field which is clear enough to be followed without difficulty most of the time, and in which the main points are explained with reasonable precision. (B1)


Talk: Comment on the applicants (p. 122)

Can give straightforward descriptions on a variety of familiar subjects […]. (B1)

Role play: Job interviews (p. 123)

Can exchange, check and confirm […] information on familiar routine and non-routine matters within his field with some confidence. (p. 123)

Talk: Talking about jobs (p. 124)

Can reasonably fluently sustain a straightforward description of one of a variety of subjects […]. (B1)

Reading

Information sheet: Work experience (p. 115)


Can find and understand relevant information in everyday material, such as letters, brochures and short official documents. (B1)



Information sheets: Job descriptions (p. 120)

Can recognise significant points in straightforward […] articles […]. (B1)

Formal eMail: Something went wrong in the interview (p. 123)

Can read correspondence relating to his/her field of interest and readily grasp the essential meaning. (B2)


Writing

Report: Work experience (p. 116)


Can write very brief, reports to a standard conventionalised format, which pass on routine factual information […]. (B1)



Formal letter: Letter of application (p. 117, p. 119)

Can convey information and ideas on abstract as well as concrete topics, check information and ask about or explain problems with reasonable precision. (B1)

Formal letter: Curriculum vitae (pp. 118–119)

Can write […] reports to a standard conventionalised format, which pass on routine factual information […]. (B1)

Language in Use

Indirect speech (pp. 114–115, p. 125)






Verbs of perception (p. 121, p. 125)




Expressing questions politely (p. 123)










Units

Skills

Descriptors


June

Unit 10: Books

Listening

Lecture: The future of printed media (p. 137)


Can follow a lecture or talk within his/her own field, provided the subject matter is familiar and the presentation straightforward and clearly structured. (B1)



Dialogue: The talent competition (p. 138)

Can keep up with an animated conversation between native speakers. (B2)

Speaking

Presentation: Don’t judge a book by its cover! (p. 126)


Can give a prepared straightforward presentation on a familiar topic […] in which the main points are explained with reasonable precision. (B1)



Talk: A book to the film OR a film to the book? (p. 127)

Can relate the plot of a book or film and describe his/her reactions. (B1)

Information exchange: books students have read (p. 128)

Can find out and pass on straightforward factual information. (B1)

Discussion: What is poetry for you? (p. 131)

Can express his/her thoughts about abstract or cultural topics […]. (B1)


Talk: Reading through various channels (p. 136)

Can briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions, plans and actions. (B1)

Presentation: Why eBooks will/won’t replace real books (p. 136)

Can explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options. (B1)

Discussion: The book first, or the DVD? (p. 138)

Can explain why something is a problem, discuss what to do next, compare and contrast alternatives. (B1)

Reading

Internet research: A question of genre (p. 128)


Can collate short pieces of information from several sources and summarise them for somebody else. (B1)



Book review: Holes by Louis Sacher (p. 129)

Can identify the main conclusions in clearly signalled argumentative texts. (B1)

Poem: Introduction to poetry (p. 130)

Can paraphrase short written passages in a simple fashion, using the original text wording and ordering. (B1)

Poem: Down in the greenhouse (p. 131)


Can relate the plot of a book or film and describe his/her reactions. (B1)

Information sheet: Publishing one’s own writing (pp. 132–133)

Can find and understand relevant information in everyday material, such as letters, brochures and short official documents. (B1)

Internet project: online publishers for young writers (p. 133)

Can […] gather information […] from different texts in order to fulfil a specific task. (B1)

Article: eBooks vs. printed books (p. 136)

Can recognise significant points in straightforward newspaper articles on familiar subjects. (B1)

Writing

Book review in an online bookshop (p. 130)


Can write straightforward connected texts on a range of familiar subjects within his field of interest, by linking a series of shorter discrete elements into a linear sequence. (B1)



Poem: Write your own poem! (p. 133)

Can write […] simple poems about people. (A2)

Letter to the editor: The future of printed media (p. 137)

Can summarise, report and give his/her opinion about accumulated factual information […] with some confidence. (B1)


Formal letter: eBooks or printed books? (p. 139)

Can collate short pieces of information from several sources and summarise them for somebody else. (B1)

Language in Use

Conditional clauses (pp. 134–135)









© The copyright of the descriptive scales and the illustrative scales (in all languages) reproduced in this document belongs to the Council of Europe.



Zusammenstellung: Stephan Waba (2011)





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