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Storybook: The Gingerbread Man


Lesson Plans

The following lesson plans have been developed for the project teachers to try out some strategies and activities to enhance young children’s interest and skills in learning English. The storybook “The Gingerbread Man” is used as the organizing focus of the English learning experiences during the tryout. The story not only provides children with pleasurable learning experiences but also serves as a springboard to the development of reading strategies, phonological awareness, and other components of language learning such as thinking skills and reference skills.


Teachers may use these plans as a reference for the teaching procedures in shared reading. The number of sessions for each storybook and design of follow-up activities should be decided as appropriate.




Session 1


Teaching Procedures

Introduction and warm-up



  • Show the children a brown cookie and ask them what it is.

  • Ask children questions relating to the different cookies or biscuits that they like to eat. You may ask: What do you like to eat? Do you like cookies? Do you like biscuits?

Reading a new story



  • Display the cover of the big book. Ask children to look at the illustrations. To help them use picture cues, you may ask: What is this? Is this a cookie? Or is this a man? Who is this man? What is the woman doing? Where are they? Are they in the town or in the country?
  • Help children identify the title from the book cover. Read the title, tracking each word and speaking with natural intonation and pace. Ask children to echo read the title.


  • Frame the letter “i” in “Gingerbread” and “a” in “Man”. Teach children how to read the short i sound in “gin” and the short a sound in “man”.

  • Change “g” in “gin” to “t” and invite children to read the new word “tin”. Then change “n” to “m” and help children read the name “Tim”. Underline the letter “i” in each word and point out that it is found in each word. Read aloud the short i sound again to help them build up the letter-sound association.

  • Put the letter “i” on top of a column of words with short i sound. Invite children to suggest other words with the same letter sound and develop a class word tree for short i.

  • Ask children to echo read the words and then the title. Display the word cards and word tree in the classroom.

  • Divide the word “gingerbread” into two parts and show them how to work out the pronunciation and meaning of “The Gingerbread Man”.

  • Encourage them to suggest other compound words like “gingerbread” e.g. blackboard, teapot, policeman, postman, fireman.

  • Provide practice in making predictions by asking: What is this story about? Why is the woman running after the Gingerbread Man? Use gestures to explain what “running” means. Then invite volunteers to demonstrate to the whole class what “running after” means. Use children’s predictions to set a purpose for reading.

  • To create suspense, take the children on a picture walk through the story up to p.13 to create suspense. Ask them to predict what will happen on the next page but do not turn the page yet.
  • Read the story aloud up to p.13, tracking each word as you read, using natural intonation and pace. You may make the following observation: Are children able to follow along with you? Do children enjoy listening to this story?


Assigning home activities



  • Give a small book to each child. Tell them to find the title and ask them to read it aloud together.

  • Encourage children to take the books home and read aloud the title and the story up to p.13 to their family and to themselves. Tell them to try to read up to the last page.

  • Tell them to turn to other pages and find out what happens to the Gingerbread Man in the end. Encourage them to use the picture clues as much as possible.


Storybook: The Gingerbread Man




Session 2


Teaching Procedures


Introduction and warm-up



  • Display the cover of the big book and read the title aloud.

  • Call children’s attention to the title on the book cover. Have children read the title together. Check if they use the proper pronunciation. Cover the letter “i” in “gin’ and “a” in “man”. Ask them to read the title aloud to find out the letter sounds. Remind them of the letter-sound association of “i” in “gin’ and “a” in “man”.

Reading the story


  • Ask children if they remember what the story is about. You may ask: What is the story about? Who runs after the Gingerbread Man? What does the Gingerbread Man do?
  • Put the pictures of the Gingerbread Man, the woman, the man and the dog on the board. Do not write the words under the pictures but invite the whole class to say what they are a few times. Check if they can pronounce the words correctly.


  • Take the children on a picture walk through the story up to p.13. Show them the way to hold the book and turn pages from front to back correctly.

  • Help them to talk about the pictures and encourage them to use the pictures to help remember what happens in the story.

  • Ask children if they know what happens to the Gingerbread Man at the end of the story. Some may be able to answer your question as they have gone through the whole book after the first session. You may ask: Does the Gingerbread Man run away? Where does he go?

  • Read the story aloud up to p.13, tracking each word as you read and using natural intonation and pace. Ask questions to involve the children in the story as you read.

  • Use the pointer to help children follow the left to right directionality, and to recognize the beginning and end of sentences.

  • Invite children to echo read the part in the quotation marks from p.4 to p.9. Emphasize the importance of gestures, tone and expressions.

  • Check if they remember the short i letter-sound association by referring to the word tree developed in the first session.

  • Frame the letter “a” in “Man” in the title. Teach children how to use analogy to read this letter sound. Ask children to find two other words with the same letter sound in the storybook. Then write these words i.e. “catch” and “ran” on word cards and put them under “Man”. Underline the letter a. Tell them to say the letter sound and then the whole word. Develop a class word tree for short a. Help children build up the letter-sound association for the short a sound.
  • Using the same procedures, frame the letter u in “run” and help them build up the letter-sound association for the short u sound. Invite the whole class to read this word using gestures and proper pronunciation. Ask children to develop a class word tree for short u, adding words from the storybook or other sources.


Activities



  • Play the tape of the song “Run, run, Gingerbread Man” for the children.

  • Use gestures and picture cues to help children understand what the song is about.

  • Have children sing along with the tape with the help of picture cues.

Rereading the story and assigning home activities



  • Play the story tape to the children or read the story aloud. Track each word and use natural intonation and pace. Encourage them to listen to the whole story, join in reading the parts in quotation marks from p.4 to p.9. Emphasize the importance of the use of gestures, tone and expressions.

  • Invite children to sing the song once together. Encourage them to sing it to their family or to themselves as often as possible.

  • Encourage children to read the title and the parts they know to their family or themselves as often as possible.

Storybook: The Gingerbread Man



Session 3


Teaching Procedures


Introduction and warm-up



  • Invite children to sing the song once together.

  • Display the cover of the big book and invite volunteers to read the title aloud.
  • Remind them how to relate the short a and short i sounds in the title to the spelling. Refer them to the word trees displayed in the classroom.


Reading the story



  • Ask children if they remember what the story is about.

  • Invite volunteers to name the different characters in the story.

  • Read the story aloud up to p.13, tracking each word and using natural intonation and pace. Encourage the children to read the parts in quotation marks from p.4 to 9.

Activities



  • Show children some picture cards of animals and people. Ask children to say what they are in English. Then show them some word cards. Ask them to match the picture cards with the word cards. Teach them to use their knowledge of sound-letter associations to match the cards used in this activity.

  • Children then put the characters on the board. Let them read these names a few times to consolidate the letter-sound association.

  • Distribute one set of pictures and word cards to each group. Working in groups, children match the pictures with word cards.

  • Remind them to use the sound-letter associations when playing the matching game. They should look at the picture, name it and then find the corresponding word card.

  • Tell children to put the word cards under the pictures to make two word books - one about animals and one about people.

  • Tell children that they can design covers for their group word books. They can write their names on the cover to show that they have made the word books.

Rereading the story and assigning home activities


  • Give out some paper and tell children to write down at least two items to add to their group’s word books about animals and people. Tell them to look up their own collection of English books e.g. old textbooks, Children’s Word Book for additional items.


  • Read the story once through and encourage children to chime in whenever they can.

  • Invite children to sing the song once together.

  • Encourage them to read the story and sing the song to their family or to themselves as often as possible.


Storybook: The Gingerbread Man



Session 4


Teaching Procedures

Introduction and warm-up



  • Ask children to sing the song “The Gingerbread Man” once together with the help of picture cues and gestures.

  • Invite children to share their group’s word books about animals and people with the whole class. Ask them what additional items they have included.

  • Display the book cover and ask children to read aloud the title once together.

Reading the story



  • Read the story aloud, tracking each word as you read and using natural intonation and pace. Encourage the children to chime in whenever they can. Pause at different places to involve the children in the reading by asking them questions.

  • Call children’s attention to the use of the expression “Once upon a time” at the beginning of a story. Ask them to tell you about other stories beginning with the same phrase.

Activities


  • Invite children to read the words once on the short i sound from the word tree. Cover the letter i in some words to check if they can work out the spelling by applying the letter-sound association.


  • Remind children of the short a sound in “man”, “ran” and “catch”. Write these words with the letter “a” placed in the same position vertically. Write the letter “a” on top of the row of words.

  • Invite children to say the short a sound after you and then read the words aloud. Tell the children that they can make a class word wall to display in the classroom.

  • Assign 2 to 3 pages to each group and tell them to look for other words with the same letter sound. Teach children to look for words with the letter “a” and then try to read this letter sound aloud, using analogy. Check if their responses sound like the “a” sound in “Man”. Compare the sounds and explain why “past” etc. does not belong to the same group. Other words from the storybook with short a sound are “swam”, “back” and “snap”. Add these words to the class word tree and class word wall for short a.

  • Go through the same procedure for the short u sound as in “run”.

  • Invite children to read through each group/list of words once. Point out the letter-sound relationship. Remind them that this is one way to help them work out the pronunciation as well as spelling of unfamiliar words.

Rereading the story and assigning home activities



  • Encourage children to find more words to add to the three word trees they have made. Give each child a piece of paper. Tell them to look up some Children’s Word Books or their old textbooks before the next lesson. They have to find at least 2 more examples for each letter sound to add to the class word trees.
  • Distribute some worksheets for children to practise the three short vowel sounds. Children have to develop their own word wall/trains at home, following the procedures carried out at school. This activity helps them apply their knowledge of letter-sound associations. Encourage them to include new words that do not appear on the class word trees.


  • Encourage children to read the title and the book at home, and then to compile their own word trains for the three short vowel sounds.


Storybook: The Gingerbread Man



Session 5


Teaching Procedures

Introduction and warm-up



  • Invite children to sing the song “Run, run, Gingerbread Man” once together with the help of picture cues and gestures.

  • Invite children to read aloud words they have written down, using the three target letter sounds. Let them share with their group members the word walls/trains they have developed.

  • Ask volunteers to read aloud their group’s word books.

  • Display the story cover and invite volunteers to read the story aloud. Get the whole class to read the title together afterwards.

Reading the story


  • Invite children to turn to p.2 and p.3. Provide support for children who cannot locate specific pages by pointing out the page number at the side of each page.


  • Use picture clues on p.2 and p.3 to help children find out who makes the Gingerbread Man and how the story begins. Invite volunteers to mime or act out “ran away”.

  • Point out the use of open and close quotation marks in the storybook. Explain that they are used when someone is talking. Ask children to find out which characters are speaking on p.4 and p.5.

  • Write “Stop!” on the board and ask children to find it in the storybook. Teach children how to read it with proper intonation. Explain and emphasize that intonation is as important as pronunciation.

  • Let children find 2 sentences which are in quotation marks and appear repeatedly from p.4 to p.9. Mime and use gestures to show the meanings.

  • Use speech bubbles and pictures to explain the situation and dialogues on the board. Demonstrate the proper intonation to be used. Invite volunteers to role play the woman and the Gingerbread Man as on p.4 and p.5.

  • Repeat the same procedures for the dialogues between the man/dog and the Gingerbread Man (p.6 – p.9). Make sure they pay special attention to the use of good gestures, tone and expressions when they are speaking.

Activities



  • Ask children to work in groups. Give a sheet of paper and some cardboard to each group to make two characters from the story: the Gingerbread Man and a man/dog/woman.

  • Put the picture of the background scene on the board. Invite each group to come out in turn, hold the cardboard characters and act out one scene from the story to the whole class.

Rereading the story and assigning home activities




  • Distribute worksheets and demonstrate to children that for homework, they need to draw one scene from p.4 to p.8 of the story. They must add speech bubbles to show what the two characters are saying.

  • Invite them to sing the song together.

  • Encourage them to read the story to their family or friends and sing the song as often as possible.


Storybook: The Gingerbread Man



Session 6


Teaching Procedures

Introduction and warm-up



  • Invite children to sing the song “Run, run, Gingerbread Man” once together.

  • Display the story cover and invite volunteers to read the title. Then let the whole class read the title together.

Reading the story



  • Read the story aloud up to p.9, tracking each word as you read. Use appropriate intonation and encourage the children to chime in whenever they can.

  • With the help of picture cues on p.10, let the children find out where the Gingerbread Man is and who he meets. Let children read p.11 silently and identify the answers to these two questions.
  • If children have difficulty in saying “crocodile”, let them listen and say “cro”, “co” and then “dile”. Do not let children depend on the written form. Write the word “crocodile” on the board and make sure that they look at the picture of the crocodile and say what it is.


  • Have children read aloud the parts for the Gingerbread Man and the crocodile up to p.13. When they read the word “laughed”, you may want the children to laugh loudly together. Teach children to use picture clues to find out the meaning of “on the nose”.

  • Ask children what “Snap! Gulp!” means. Encourage them to guess the meaning. Explain that the pronunciation may also provide some hints.

Activities


  • Read aloud the action rhyme “Two Little Dicky Birds”.

  • Use gestures to explain the meaning of “Fly away” and “Come back” in the rhyme. Point out the use of these two expressions and let the children find similar expressions in the story.

  • Teach children how to perform the actions to help them understand and remember the rhyme.

  • Invite half the class to say the rhyme and the other half to perform the actions. Then they exchange roles.

  • Distribute the rhyme sheets and let them read the rhyme once together using appropriate gestures.

Rereading the story and assigning home activities



  • Encourage children to say the rhyme as often as possible at home. Remind them that the actions can help them remember the lines.

  • Read the story aloud and encourage the children to chime in whenever they can.

  • Encourage children to read the story aloud to their family or to themselves at home.


Storybook : The Gingerbread Man



Session 7



Teaching Procedures

Introduction and warm-up



  • Invite children to say the rhyme “Two Little Dicky Birds” once with actions.

  • Display the story cover and invite volunteers to read the title. Ask the whole class to read the title together afterwards.

Reading the story



  • Read the story aloud up to p.9. Assign different groups to read the parts for the different characters. Remind them that it is important to use good intonation and expressions when reading.

  • Ask children if they remember where the Gingerbread Man is and who he meets after p.9. You may ask: Who runs after the Gingerbread Man? What does he do? Where does he run to? He gets to a place where there is a lot of water. Where is it? He sees an animal. What is it? What does he do?

  • Read the story aloud from p.10 on, tracking each word as you read, use appropriate intonation and encourage the children to chime in whenever they can.

  • Ask them questions during the reading to help them understand the story better. Encourage them to use their imagination to change the story ending.

  • Invite children to use gestures to show what “Snap!” and “Gulp!” mean.

Activities



  • Let children use cardboard/drawing paper to make the crocodile and the river. Make them role play the Gingerbread Man and other characters in the story.
  • Assign different groups to be responsible for different scenes in the story. Children in each group play the roles of the different characters. They work together to act out the whole story with the help of cardboard characters and the background sheet.


  • Add flags of speech bubbles to make a three-dimensional storybook to display in the classroom.

Rereading the story and assigning home activities



  • Let children say the rhyme once together with actions.

  • Read the story aloud and encourage them to chime in whenever they can.

  • Encourage children to read the story aloud to their family or themselves at home.


Storybook: The Gingerbread Man




Session 8


Teaching Procedures


Introduction and warm-up


  • Invite children to say the rhyme “Two Little Dicky Birds” once together.

  • Display the story cover and invite volunteers to read the title. Tell the whole class to read the title together.

Reading the story



  • Read the story aloud, pausing at words you think children know. Have them chime in on these words.

  • Remind children to use picture cues, if needed, when they read.

  • When children misread a word, they may read back to a previous word/sentence for possible clarification. Do not stop them too many times just to correct their pronunciation.

Activities


  • Point out the initial sound in the word “can”. Write this word on the board and underline the letter “c”. Ask children to read the hard c (=k) sound after you. Help them to develop a class word tree on the hard c sound. Invite them to find other words with the same letter sound in the storybook to add to the word tree.


  • Use the same procedure to build up the letter-sound association for the final k sound in “back”. Remind children not to leave out this ending consonant sound when reading.

  • When asked to find other words with the same letter sound in the storybook, the children may suggest “take” (p.11). Point out that although “back” and “take” both end in k sound, they do not have the same letter-sound association because “back” ends in k but “take” ends in “ke”. Children may use other words from other sources with the same letter sound as “back” to put on the word tree.

Rereading the story and assigning home activities



  • Read the story aloud and encourage them to chime in whenever they can.

  • Encourage children to say the action rhyme and read the story to their family or to themselves.

  • Encourage them to develop their own word trains/walls for the initial hard c or final k sounds. They can refer to their own collection of English books or the Children’s Picture Word Books for more items. Remind them that this method helps them to work out the pronunciation of words more accurately.


Storybook: The Gingerbread Man




Session 9


Teaching Procedures

Introduction and warm-up



  • Let children say the action rhyme once together.
  • Invite children to share with the whole class additional items on hard c and ending k sounds that they have added to the word trees.


  • Invite children to say the title of the book together and then display the cover.

Reading the story


  • Read the story aloud, tracking each word as you read and using natural intonation and pace. Pause before parts which you think children are able to read and encourage them to chime in whenever they can.

  • Assign different groups to read the parts for the different characters in the story. Let children participate in a jigsaw story reading activity. With the help of the cardboard characters they have made, they take turns to act out different scenes from the story.

Activities



  • Ask children to suggest other possible scenes to add to the story.

  • Tell them to take out the word books which they have made in their groups. Ask them to suggest two characters to add to the story by choosing other animals and people from their books.

  • Ask children if they know where the Gingerbread Man goes in the end. Find out if they like this ending. Suggest that they may change the ending of the story if they do not want the Gingerbread Man to be swallowed by the crocodile. Invite them to write a new ending for the story.

  • Ask children to work in groups and write one new episode and a new ending for the story.

  • Invite volunteers to act out what the new characters would say to the Gingerbread Man in the new episodes.

  • Invite volunteers to act out the new ending to the story.

Rereading the story and assigning home activities


  • Assign different children to be the different characters in the story and read aloud the story once in their own groups.


  • Encourage children to read aloud the story at home as often as possible. Remind them of the importance of using gestures, intonation and expressions.


Storybook: The Gingerbread Man




Session 10


Teaching Procedures

Introduction and warm-up



  • Display the book cover but hide the title. Invite volunteers to tell the whole class the title of the book.

  • Ask children if they read the story at home to their family and to themselves.

  • Ask them if they like the story. Invite them to share with the whole class the part of the story they like/don’t like most.

Reading the story


  • Invite a few volunteers to take turns to read aloud the whole story to their classmates, who can provide support when needed.

  • When children have completed their reading, encourage them to close the book and use the vocabulary from the book to retell the story.

  • Invite groups of children to act out the story, using cardboard pictures and including the new episode and new ending.

  • Invite the whole class to act out a new story, using the original story line, a few new episodes and a new ending.

Sharing time and suggesting follow-up work


  • Invite the whole class to say the action rhyme once together.

  • Invite the whole class to sing the song once together.

  • Remind them of the word books and word walls/trees/trains they have made and encourage them to add other words to them in the future.

  • Ask children if they have made their own word books and word trees/trains/walls for the few letter sounds they have worked on. Invite volunteers to share their efforts with the whole class.

  • List on the board the different activities carried out in these 10 sessions. Ask children which activity/activities they liked most.

  • Encourage children to sing the song, say the action rhyme, read the story and participate in drama activities whenever there is a suitable chance.

  • Encourage children to add new episodes or write a new ending to the story at home. Suggest that they may do this with other books they have read.

  • Prepare a set of storybooks with similar themes and language items. Encourage children to borrow these storybooks from the class library to read at home.









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