Lesson: The Weather



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Course: Basic Information

Unit: The Environment

Lesson: The Weather




Competency Objectives: Adult students recognize common weather words and their implications for daily activity and clothing choices.

NOTE: After completing Clothes in Domain Three, you may want to review weather terms and re-visit the topic of choosing clothing to suit the weather.


Suggested Criteria for Success: Given weather scenarios, adult learners respond correctly to questions about appropriate activities and attire for the day.
Suggested Vocabulary: beginning

hot wet sunny cold cool

cloudy dry warm rainy clear

foggy windy stormy snow/snowy


advanced beginning/intermediate

watch freezing warning flood hail

Celsius tornado thunder sky humid

Fahrenheit hurricane sticky breezy frost

icy patches lightening
advanced intermediate

sizzling downpour dew evacuate blizzard

windy overcast storm breezy hail

snowstorm icy patches sleet freezing rain flurries

Suggested Materials: Weather puzzle from Bogglesworld sufficient in number for each student.

Instructions for converting from Celsius to Fahrenheit or prepared conversion chart for each student.

A weekly weather report xeroxed from your local newspaper for each student.

Paper and pencils or pens.

Selected articles of clothing or pictures of clothing to use in dressing for the weather.

Picture dictionaries.

Teacher taped weather forecasts from TV or radio and VCR or tape player

Computer with internet connection, LCD projector, and screen; or a multi-media classroom.

Suggested Resources: http://bogglesworld.com Click on Word Searches at the top of the page. Then click on Weather for a puzzle. Boggle's World is a resource site for teachers. Just click, print, and copy. The resources are free for use in your classroom.
http://www.weather.com/ The Weather Channel. Enter your zip code and click on go. Click on 10 day. Scroll down and click on Printable Forecast (or it may copy better as a direct screen print.) Click on averages for the average high/low and the record high/low (and date) in the zip code and month that you select.
http://www.weatherclassroom.com/index.php Weather Classroom. Explore the teacher’s guides and other resources available through this site. You must register.
http://www.usatoday.com/weather/wtempcf.htm Converting Between Temperature Scales.
http://www.familyeducation.com/article/0,1120,22-5176,00.html Celsius and Fahrenheit Made Simple.
Lets Talk About the Weather by Lucy Horton, Martin Community College. This plan comes from English as a Second Language: A Collection of Lesson Plans for the Year 2000, a publication of NCCCS developed under the direction of Dr. Florence Taylor.
Local newspaper weekly weather report(s).
http://home.att.net/~teaching/refbook.htm Climate Comparison Chart and teaching resource suggestions for having students research weather and climate data for two places. Students can compare temperature and precipitation data for their current city and a city in their home country.
http://www.worldclimate.com/ World Climate website.
Suggested Methods: Discussion, Puzzle, Math, Chain Drill, Sorting, Modeling, Writing.
Some Suggested Steps

Matching. Put two lists on the board and ask students if they know what any of the words mean. Discuss meanings. Use dictionaries. Match opposites.


Match the Opposites

hot wet


clear cold

cool cloudy

dry rainy

sunny warm


Puzzle. Distribute the Weather puzzle from Boggles World. Go over the words with the students. Pronounce the words and ask students to pronounce them after you. Talk about the meaning of each word. Do a chain drill around the room with each student pronouncing a word. Complete a word chart as shown on the next page and then ask the students to work the puzzle.
Do a chart of hot words, cold words, wet words, and storm words, and other weather words. Put the chart on the board and let students tell you where the words belong. You and the class may have some decisions to make a few words: for example, will you identify blizzard as a storm word, a cold word, or a wet word. An example of a possible listing is given below.

Cold Words
Hot Words
Wet Words
Storm Words
Other Weather Words

cool

warm

rainy

blizzard

windy

freezing

sizzling

downpour

hurricane

clear

snow/snowy

sunny

dew

thunder

blue sky


frost

humid

icy patches

lightening

breezy










flood

cloudy










hail

dry










earthquake

foggy










watch

windy










warning




Fahrenheit and Celsius. Ask students if temperature is reported in their native land as Celsius or Fahrenheit. Show them how to do conversion. (See http://www.usatoday.com/weather/wtempcf.htm) If you want to avoid the math and have online connections in your classroom, any of the following websites will do the conversions for you: http://www.wbuf.noaa.gov/tempfc.htm, http://www.teaching-english-in-japan.net/conversion/celsius, http://www.onlineconversion.com/temperature.htm, http://www.chapelsteel.com/fahrenheit-celsius.html.

Use http://www.worldclimate.com/ to prepare a weather comparison chart for average monthly temperatures in your town in Fahrenheit and another world city in Celsius. (Type in the city name, click on the correct city, click on Average Temperature.) Have students make the conversion to Fahrenheit and compare the average weather in the two cities for each month of the year. A sample is given. Fahrenheit conversions are given in red. You can drop the decimals for simpler comparison.




Hong Kong China

Burlington, North Carolina


January

16.2°C

61.2°F

37.4°F

February

16.1°C

61.0°F

40.5°F

March

18.4°C

65.1°F

49.5°F

April

22.1°C

71.8°F

58.5°F

May


26.1°C

79.0°F

66.7°F

June

28.0°C

82.4°F

74.5°F

July

28.7°C

83.7°F

78.1°F

August

28.6°C

83.5°F

77.0°F

September

27.9°C

82.2°F

70.3°F

October

25.4°C

77.7°F

59.2°F

November

21.8°C

71.2°F

50.4°F

December

17.7°C


63.9°F

41.2°F


Dressing for the Weather Distribute xeroxed copies of a weekly newspaper forecast. Ask students to describe the weather day by day. Discuss how one would dress for the weather as it is predicted. This activity can be more interesting if the forecast you use is not one for the season in which you are teaching or if you have forecasts from several different seasons. You may want to bring articles of clothing to use in this exercise.
Weather and Activities. Prepare a series of weather reports. If you have equipment and time, you can tape weather reports on a VCR over a year’s time and use them. You can record a 10 day forecast from http://www.weather.com/ once each month over a year and use those. (Put your zip code in and click on Go. Click on 10-day.) You can also create simple verbal weather reports. Share your reports and ask students to say whether an activity is appropriate for the weather. Suggested activities and suggested core aspects of some weather reports are given on the next page to get you started. You can mix the activities and reports to get different outcomes. Make students aware that judgement calls are sometimes required.
Use the form “Can you ________ today?” Ask students to respond with “Yes, I can ________” orNo, I can’t _______.”

Activity List

Weather Reports

Can you go swimming today?


Hot and sunny. High today 92 °.

Can you build a snowman today?

Warm and breezy. High today 65 º.

Can you plant flowers today?.

Windy and cool. High today 47 °.

Can you go for a walk in the park today?

Cloudy and humid. High today 98 °.

Can you play baseball today?

Blue skies. Dry and hot. High 89 °.

Can you play golf today?

Overcast skies. Warm. High 78 °.

Can you go to a movie today?

Thunderstorms. High 70 °.

Can you rake leaves today?

Early morning fog. High 55 °.

Can you go to work today?

Clear and cold. High 32 °. Icy patches on the roads. Freezing weather.

Can you wear a T-shirt today?

Clear and sunny. High today 39 °

Can you go shopping today?

Hurricane warning. High today 80 °




Tune In for the Weather Report. The Weather Channel has Weather on the Eights. Tell your learners that the time is 2:15 p.m. Ask them to tell you when your next local weather report will be given. (The answer is 2:18 p.m. The weather is given at 2:08, 2:18, 2:28, 2:38, 2:48, 3:08, etc.)
Listening Exercise. For high intermediate students, tape weather reports from the radio and prepare a format such as the following. Adjust the form to match the weather report structure in your area.


Today

Tomorrow

High:

High:

Low:

Low

Play the report two or three times. Let students record the highs and lows for the day and the forecast for tomorrow. Review vocabulary words that come up like sticky, showers, and foggy.


Journal Work. Give the season, describe the weather, and tell what you do on a perfect day.

A sample composition follows


My Perfect Day

My perfect day is in the Fall. It is clear and sunny. The sky is blue. The high is 67°. I walk in the park and see all the autumn leaves.

Let’s Talk About the Weather

Scenario


Students need to learn information about weather conditions.
Intended level(s)

Multi-level


Approximate length of lesson


A single class lesson

Expected student outcomes

Students will gain an increased understanding of weather conditions that will enable them to make decisions about work, clothing, and emergency situations.


Materials/Resources needed


Vocabulary handout included

Procedure


What is a weather forecast?

Information about weather conditions that we learn from television, radio, and newspapers (Purchase a USA Today and display the weather page).


Handouts

Weather vocabulary (included)

Conversion chart of Celsius to Fahrenheit temperature

Winds – Miles per Hour (MPH)

Hurricanes – watches and warings

Cyclones in Asia

Tornadoes – warnings and watches

Storms – thunder and lightning

Precipitation

Rain


Snow

Sleet and ice

General Forecast

Sunny


Cloudy and overcast

Foggy


Stormy

Evacuation


What is your plan?

Batteries

Food

Water Supply



Shelter
Seasons of the year – on the chalkboard

Chart and discuss.

Review names of months and days.

What weather do we have in each season?


Talk about weather in each student’s native country.

Display world map.

Discuss map terms.

Assessment


Students will be better able to comprehend daily weather forecasts.

Comments


After all, the weather is an international topic. To be able to talk about the weather with your neighbor is another step toward assimilation into the culture in which you live.
Author: Lucy Horton

Martin Community College




Vocabulary for Weather Lesson

Weather


Temperature

Conversion

Fahrenheit

Celsius


Hurricanes

Tornadoes (Cyclones in Asia)

Evacuation

Thermometer

Seasons

Spring


Summer

Fall (Autumn)

Winter

Longitude



Latitude

Equator



The Weather



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