Level 3 Field Operations Guide (fog) or Handbook



Download 0.79 Mb.
Page12/17
Date conversion03.05.2018
Size0.79 Mb.
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17

Hand Signals

  1. Helicopter Hand Signals


frame14

  1. Crane Hand Signals







    1. Military Aircraft Specifications



Military Aircraft Capabilities



Aircraft

Type


Cargo Capability (Tons)


Passenger Capability


Airspeed (MPH)

C-130

11.6

90

260

C-141

27.3

200

390

C-17

35.7

100

390

KC-10

37.8

N/A

425


C-5

73.5

73

415


Allowable Cabin Loads (ACL)


Type Aircraft

Passenger Seats (ACL)

Cargo Tons (ACL)

Wide-body Aircraft:

B-747

400-479

90

DC-10

280-330

75

L-1011

280-300

60

MD-11

360-402

82-86

Narrow-body Aircraft:

A-310

210

0

DC 8-61

0

45


DC 8-62

0

39.2

DC 8-62/61

0

39.2

DC 8-63/73

0

45

B 707-320 B/C

180

36.5

B 727, B 737

94-160

22

B 757-200

190

0

B 767

200-240

0

DC 9-30

0

17

L-100

0

23



    1. Task Force Media Procedures




    Information flow related to disaster response activities will be managed and coordinated by the DHS/FEMA Headquarters Office of Public Affairs.


  • On-site Media procedures will be established by the local authorities. The IST will liaison with the TFs regarding all media activities.

  • Interviewing “Do's":

  • Ask the reporter’s name. Then use it in response;

  • Use full name. Nicknames are not appropriate;

  • Choose the site (if possible). Make sure you are comfortable with the location of the interview. Consider what is in the background;

  • Choose the time (if possible). If you would be more comfortable waiting another five minutes, ask the reporter if that's okay;

  • Be calm. Demeanor and apparent control of the situation are very important in establishing the tempo of evolving events;

  • Tell the truth;

  • Be cooperative. There is an answer to most questions, and if you don’t know it now, let them know you will work diligently to determine the facts needed;

  • Be professional. Don’t let personal feelings about the media in general, or this reporter specifically, affect response;

  • Be patient. Expect dumb questions. If the same question is asked again, repeat answer without irritation;

  • Take time. If you make a mistake during a taped or non-broadcast interview, indicate that you would like to start over with response, if appearing live, just start over; and

  • Use wrap-around sentences. This means repeating the question with answer for a complete sound byte.

  • Interviewing “Don'ts”:

  • Say "no comment";

  • Give personal opinion. Stick to the facts;

  • Go off the record. Anything you say can and will be used against you;

  • Lie. To tell a lie unintentionally is a mistake. To intentionally tell a lie is stupid;
  • Bluff. The truth will come out;


  • Be defensive. The media and their audience recognize a defensive attitude and tend to believe you're hiding something;

  • Be afraid. Fear is debilitating and is not a characteristic you want to portray;

  • Be evasive. Be up front on what you know about the situation, and what you plan to do to mitigate the incident;

  • Use jargon. The public is not familiar with much of the language used in the US&R field;

  • Confront. This is not the time to tell a reporter how much you dislike the media;

  • Try to talk and command an incident at the same time. You won’ do either well.

  • Wear sunglasses;

  • Smoke;

  • Promise results or speculate; and

  • Repeat leading questions.

APPENDIX A
ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS


ACL

Allowable Cabin Loads

AP

Assembly Point







BoO

Base of Operations







CISD

Critical Incident Stress Debriefing

cm

Centimeters







Dept.

Department

DFO


Disaster Field Office

DHS

Department of Homeland Security

DMAT

Disaster Medical Assistance Team

DMORT

Disaster Mortuary Team

DoD

Department of Defense

DOT

Department of Transportation







EMA

Emergency Management Agency

EP&R

Emergency Preparedness and Response

ERT

Emergency Response Team

ESF

Emergency Support Function

EST

Emergency Support Team







FCO

Federal Coordinating Officer

FEMA

Federal Emergency Management Agency

FIRESCOPE

Firefighting Resources of California Organized for Potential Emergencies

FOG


Field Operations Guide

FRP

Federal Response Plan







HAZMAT

Hazardous Material(s)







i.e.

Example

IAP

Incident Action Plan

IC

Incident Commander

ICP

Incident Command Post

ICS

Incident Command System

ID

Identification

IDLH

Immediate Danger to Life or Health

IST

Incident Support Team







JIC

Joint Information Center







km

Kilometers

kph

Knots per Hour







ml

Milliliters

mm

Millimeters

mph

Miles per Hour

MOA

Memorandum of Agreement

Mob Center

Mobilization Center

MOU

Memorandum of Understanding







NDMS

National Disaster Medical System

NEMIS

National Emergency Management Information System

NIIMS

National Interagency Information Management System







Ops

Operations







PCF

Patient Care Form

POA

Point of Arrival

POC

Point of Contact

POD


Point of Departure

PPE

Personal Protective Equipment







RST

Regional Support Team







SOP

Standard Operating Procedure







TF

Task Force

TFCP

Task Force Command Post

TFL

Task Force Leader







US&R

Urban Search and Rescue

APPENDIX B
GLOSSARY OF COMMON TERMS

------------- A -------------
Activation  Formal request from DHS/FEMA to a TF via the Point of Contact, that an event has occurred or is projected to occur, that requires mobilization and response for a mission.
Advisory  Formal notification by DHS/FEMA to all TFs that an event is imminent or has occurred but does not require action at this time.
After-Action Debriefing Form  Used by the TF managers at the conclusion of a mission to collect and categorize appropriate information.

After-Action Meeting  A formal meeting of the TF personnel assigned to a mission after return from the field.

After-Action Report  Documentation of TF actions and other pertinent information.
Alert  Formal notification by DHS/FEMA to identified TFs that a disaster is imminent or has occurred that may result in activation.
Assembly Point (AP)  Location or facility where TF members initially report after receiving activation orders from the sponsoring organization.
-------------
B -------------
Base of Operations  TF base camp used to facilitate mission activities.
-------------
C -------------
Cache  A DHS/FEMA-approved complement of tools, equipment, and supplies stored in a designated location, available for emergency use.
Collapse hazard zone  The area established by the TF for the purpose of controlling all access to the immediate area of the collapse.
-------------
D -------------
Demobilization  The process used to plan for and implement the return of TFs to their original Point of Departure.

Department of Homeland Security (DHS)  The executive department of the United States [whose] primary responsibility is to: (a) prevent terrorism; (b) reduce the vulnerability of the United States to terrorism; (c) minimize the damage, and assist in the recovery, from terrorist attacks that do occur within the United States; (d) carry out all functions of entities transferred to the Department, including by acting as a focal point regarding natural and manmade crises and emergency planning; (e) ensure that the functions of the agencies and subdivisions within the Department that are not related directly to securing the homeland are not diminished or neglected except by a specific explicit Act of Congress; (f) ensure that the overall economic security of the United States is not diminished by efforts, activities, and programs aimed at securing the homeland; and (g) monitor connections between illegal drug trafficking and terrorism, coordinate efforts to sever such connections, and otherwise contribute to efforts to interdict illegal drug trafficking.

Disaster Field Office (DFO)  The temporary office established in or near the designated disaster area from which the Federal Coordinating Officer and staff, the Emergency Response Team, the State Coordinating Officer and staff (when possible), and regional response organizations coordinate response activities.
Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT)  The basic medical unit of the National Disaster Medical System (NDMS). All TF Medical Teams will be registered as a "specialized" DMAT with the NDMS.
-------------
E -------------
Emergency signaling  Signals produced by warning devices on the US&R work site to address evacuation of the area, cease operations or quiet the area, and resume operations.
Engagement/disengagement  Procedures followed by a TF when beginning or ending operations at a specific work site or assigned area.
Emergency Response Team (ERT)  The interagency group assembled to assist the assigned FCO in carrying out his/her disaster response coordination responsibilities. The ERT coordinates the overall Federal disaster response reporting on the conduct of specific operations, exchanging information, and resolving issues related to ESFs and other response requirements. ERT members respond and meet as requested by the FCO.
ERT ESF #9 Leader  The position on the ERT that assumes management and coordination of ESF #9 resources when the RST transfers all US&R responsibilities to the ERT and when the IST is operational in the field. The ERT ESF #9 Leader coordinates all US&R activities with the State, the Emergency Services Branch Chief, the IST ESF #9 Assistant, and the EST ESF #9 Leader.

Emergency Support Function (ESF) – A functional area of response activity established to facilitate the delivery of Federal assistance required during the immediate response phase of a disaster to save lives, protect property and public health, and to maintain public safety. ESFs represent those types of Federal assistance which the State will most likely need because of the overwhelming impact of a catastrophic or significant disaster on its own resources and response capabilities, or because of the specialized or unique nature of the assistance required. ESF missions are designed to supplement State and local response efforts.

ESF #9  National US&R Response System
ESF #9 Assistant  The position located with the IST that provides management oversight to the IST. The ESF #9 Assistant coordinates with the EST and ERT ESF #9 cells, the IST Leader, Task Force Leaders, local and State incident management personnel, and supporting ESFs.
ESF #9 cell (at the DFO)  DHS/FEMA representatives at the DFO who coordinate State requests for US&R resources.
EST ESF #9 Leader  The individual at working at the EST responsible for assessing requests for US&R Task Forces, alerting, activating and deploying ESF #9 resources when approved and overseeing ESF #9 mission assignments, staffing, information and planning, and demobilization activities.
ESF #9 Leader  The individual at DHS/FEMA Headquarters responsible for assessing requests for US&R TFs.
Emergency Support Team (EST)  The Emergency Support Team (EST) is organized, using Incident Command System (ICS) functional groupings of management, operations, logistics, information and planning, and administration/finance, for the activation of the EST, of Federal resources, and mission assignments. The EST coordinates requests for additional resources and receives situation reports.
-------------
F -------------
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)  Agency with primary responsibility for ESF #9 (Urban Search and Rescue.)
Federal Coordinating Officer (FCO)  The senior official in charge at the DFO who manages all Federal response activities.

Federal Response Plan (FRP)  The Federal Government's plan of action to assist affected States and local jurisdictions after a major disaster or emergency.

------------- I -------------
Incident Action Plan (IAP)  A document developed by the ICS management team that identifies all incident objectives, strategies and tactics, and assigns responsibilities.
Incident Command Post (ICP)  The location where the local jurisdiction's primary command functions are executed.
Incident Commander (IC)  The local jurisdiction's person responsible for the management of all incident operations.
Incident Daily Briefing Form  A form for conducting planning sessions and briefings during the course of a mission.
Incident Support Team (IST)  The IST provides a group of highly qualified specialists readily available for rapid assembly and deployment to a disaster area. The IST furnishes Federal, State, and local officials with technical assistance in acquiring and using US&R resources. It provides advice, Incident Command assistance, management, and coordination of US&R Task Forces, and US&R logistics support.
Initial TF Briefing Form  A form developed for use during the activation phase of the response.
-------------
J -------------
Joint Information Center (JIC)  The physical location where Public Information Officers collocate and form the core of the Joint Information System.
-------------
L -------------
Load master  Individual responsible for all matters associated with preparing the TF equipment, supplies, and personnel during the palletizing, loading, in-flight logistics, and down-loading of the aircraft.

Local Emergency Operations Center (EOC)  Each local jurisdiction will usually have an EOC to coordinate response to and support of moderate to large-scale incidents. Initial damage and needs assessment information is consolidated at this point to determine response needs and State and Federal asset requirements. Authority for the management of a disaster rests with the local officials and/or Incident Leader of the affected jurisdictions. State and Federal response is in support of local requests once local resources and capabilities are overwhelmed.

Local jurisdiction  The affected locality/government that has the mandated responsibility for managing the disaster within its borders or boundaries.
-------------
M -------------
Medical Team Fact Sheet  An informational sheet outlining the capabilities and requirements of the TF Medical Team.
Memorandum of Agreement (MOA)  The document between an organization sponsoring a TF and DHS/FEMA outlining all agreements and responsibilities.
Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)  Written agreements developed on site between the IST and jurisdictional incident management personnel to ensure a complete understanding of the scope, nature and requirements of the ESF #9 assignment.
Mobilization Center  A temporary facility used to receive process and support resources/TFs during the mobilization and demobilization phases of a mission.
------------- N -------------
National Disaster Medical System (NDMS).  A system under the auspices of NDMS used during natural disasters or emergencies.
------------- O -------------
Operational checklist  A chronological listing of considerations and/or tasks that the identified user should address when carrying out mission assignments.
Operational period  The time interval scheduled for execution of a given set of US&R actions.
Operational procedures  Documents developed to address strategies and tactics that a TF may be required to address and execute during a mission response.
Operational work area  The area established by the TF for controlling all activities in the immediate area of the work site.

Operations Chief  The position in the Incident Command System that is responsible for managing the overall incident tactical operations and to whom the US&R TFs directly or indirectly report.

------------- P -------------
Point of Arrival (POA)  The location where responding resources arrive, prior to being transported to a mobilization center or assigned to an affected local jurisdiction.
Point of Departure (POD)  Designated location where a TF reports for transport to an incident.
------------- R -------------
Responder Information Sheet  A form developed to collect and list all necessary information on TF personnel.
Regional Support Team (RST)  Entity that serves as the initial point of contact for the affected State(s), other Federal agencies, and the Emergency Support Team. The RST ceases to be a coordinating center once the DFO is established.
------------- S -------------
Safety Officer  an individual assigned the primary responsibility of safety compliance.
Sponsoring Organization  the entity responsible for developing and managing all aspects of a TF.
Staging Area  A designated area or facility where incoming resources report to and receive their tactical assignments and situation briefings by the local jurisdiction.
------------- T -------------
TF Base of Operations Location Checklist  A form developed to assist TF personnel select a location for the BoO.
TF Command Post (TFCP)  Central control point within the TF BoO.
TF Operations Report  A form for documenting events during the execution of rescue operations.
TF Fact Sheet  summarizes the composition, capabilities and limitations, and support requirements of a US&R TF.

APPENDIX C
UNITS OF MEASURE, SYMBOLS, AND CONVERSION FACTORS
TEMPERATURE CONVERSION FACTORS
Centigrade to Fahrenheit:

(Centigrade Temperature X 1.8) + 32 = Fahrenheit

(Fahrenheit Temperature - 32) X 0.555 = Centigrade


WATER BY VOLUME/WEIGHT





(at 16.7 o Centigrade or 62 o Fahrenheit)


1 US gallon =

8.33 lbs.

1 US gallon =

0.833 UK gallons

1 US gallon =

3.79 liters

1 UK gallon =

10 lbs.

1 UK gallon =

1.2 US gallons

1 UK gallon =

4.54 liters

1 liter =

1 kilogram (2.2 lbs.)

1 liter =

0.26 US gallons

1 liter =

0.22 UK gallons

1 feet3 =

62.3 lbs.



DISTANCE





1 Nautical Mile (6082 ft) =

1.152 Statute Miles

1 Nautical Mile (6082 ft) =

1.852 Kilometers

1 Kilometer (1000 meters) =

0.54 Nautical Miles

1 Kilometer (1000 meters) =

0.62 Statute Miles

1 Statute Mile (5280 ft) =

1.6 Kilometers

1 Statute Mile (5280 ft) =

0.87 Nautical Miles



AREA





1 acre =

43,560 ft2

1 square mile =

640 acres


METRIC TO ENGLISH


To convert

into

multiply by

LENGTHS







millimeters (mm)

inches

0.03937

centimeters (cm)

inches

0.3937

meters

inches

39.37

meters

feet 3.281

feet 3.281

meters

yards

1.0936

kilometers (km)

yards

1093.6

kilometers (km)

miles

0.6214

SURFACES





centimeter2

square inches

0.155

meter2

square feet

10.764

meter2

square yards

1.196

kilometer2

square miles

0.3861

hectares

acres

2.471

VOLUMES







centimeter3 (cm)

cubic inches

0.06102

centimeter3 (cm)

liquid ounces

0.03381

meter3

cubic feet

35.314

meter3

cubic yards

1.308

meter3


US gallons

264.2

liters

cubic inches

61.023

liters

cubic feet

0.03531

liters

US gallons

0.2642

liters

cups

4.166

liters

pints

2.128

liters

quarts

1.053

milliliters (ml)

teaspoon

0.2

milliliters (ml)

tablespoon

0.666

milliliters (ml)

fluid ounces

0.333

WEIGHTS





grams


grains

15.432

grams

ounces

0.03527

kilograms (kg)

ounces

35.27

kilograms (kg)

pounds

2.2046

Kilograms (kg)

US tons

0.001102

metric ton

pounds

2204.6

metric ton

US tons

1.1023

ENGLISH TO METRIC


To convert

into

multiply by

LENGTHS







inches

millimeters (mm)

25.4

inches

centimeters (cm)


2.54

inches

meters

0.0254

feet

meters

0.3048

yards

meters

0.9144

yards

kilometers (km)

914.4

miles

kilometers (km)

1.609

SURFACES







square inches

centimeter2

6.452

square feet

meter2

0.092

square yards

meter2

0.8361

acres

hectares

0.4047

square miles


kilometer2

2.59

VOLUMES







cubic inches

centimeter3

16.387

cubic inches

liters

0.0164

cubic feet

meter3

0.0283

cubic feet

liters

28.317

cubic yards

meter3

0.7646

fluid ounces

milliliters (ml)

30.0

liquid ounces

centimeter3

29.57

teaspoon

milliliters (ml)

5.0

tablespoon

milliliters (ml)

15.0


cups

liters

0.24

pints

liters

0.47

quarts

liters

0.95

US gallons

meter3

0.00378

US gallons

liters

3.785

WEIGHTS







grains

grams

0.0648

ounces

grams

28.35

ounces

kilograms (kg)

0.02835

pounds

kilograms (kg)

0.4536

pounds

metric ton

0.000454

US tons


kilograms (kg)

907.2

US tons

metric ton

0.9072

SAFFIR/SIMPSON HURRICANE SCALE
(Source: Department of Commerce,

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,



National Weather Service, National Hurricane Center)
Category 1 hurricane -- The lowest of five levels of relative hurricane intensity on the Saffir/Simpson hurricane scale. A Category 1 hurricane is defined by winds of 74 to 95 MPH, or a storm surge of 4 to 5 feet above normal. This category normally does not cause real damage to permanent structures, although damage to unanchored mobile homes, shrubbery, and trees can be expected. Also some coastal road flooding and minor pier damage.
Category 2 hurricane -- The second of five levels of relative hurricane intensity on the Saffir/Simpson hurricane scale. A Category 2 hurricane is defined by winds of 96 to 110 MPH, or a storm surge of 6 to 8 feet above normal. This category normally causes some roofing material, door, and window damage to buildings. Considerable damage to vegetation, mobile homes, and piers can be expected. Coastal and low-lying escape routes can be expected to flood 2-4 hours before arrival of storm center. Small craft in unprotected anchorages will break moorings.

Category 3 hurricane -- The third of five levels of relative hurricane intensity on the Saffir/Simpson hurricane scale. A Category 3 hurricane is defined by winds of 111 to 130 MPH, or a storm surge of 9 to 12 feet above normal. This category normally does some structural damage to small residences and utility buildings, with a minor amount of curtain wall failures. Mobile homes are destroyed. Flooding near the coast can be expected to destroy smaller structures, with larger structures damaged by floating debris. Terrain continuously lower than 5 feet above sea level may be flooded inland as far as 6 miles.

Category 4 hurricane -- The fourth of five levels of relative hurricane intensity on the Saffir/Simpson hurricane scale. A Category 4 hurricane is defined by winds of 131 to 155 MPH, or a storm surge of 13 to 18 feet above normal. This category normally causes more extensive curtain wall failures, with some complete roof structure failure on small residences. Major erosion will occur at beach areas. Major damage to lower floors of structures near the shore can be expected. Terrain continuously lower than 10 feet above sea level may be flooded, requiring massive evacuation of residential areas inland as far as 6 miles.
Category 5 hurricane -- The severest of five levels of relative hurricane intensity on the Saffir/Simpson hurricane scale. A Category 5 hurricane is defined by winds greater than 155 MPH, or a storm surge greater than 18 feet above normal. This category normally causes complete roof failure on many residential and industrial buildings; some are blown over or away. Major damage to lower floors of all structures located less than 15 feet above sea level and within 500 yards of the shoreline can be expected. Massive evacuation of residential areas on low ground within 5-10 miles of the shoreline may be required.
Wind Factors
The following chart classifies wind speeds by both miles per hour (mph) and knots per hour (kph).
1 knot per hour equals 1.15 miles per hour

Tropical Storm

34-64 kph

40-74 mph

Category 1 Hurricane


65-83 kph

75-95 mph

Category 2 Hurricane

84-96 kph

96-110 mph

Category 3 Hurricane

97-115 kph

111-132 mph

Category 4 Hurricane

116-135 kph

133-155 mph

Category 5 Hurricane

136-200 kph

156-230 mph


THIS PAGE IS INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

APPENDIX D




1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page