Literacy Narrative: Unit 1: Stories with historical settings Wk 1



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Literacy – Narrative: Unit 1: Stories with historical settings – Wk 1



Lesson 1 – 8/03/10

Intro / M&O Starter

Quick Activity

Main Activity

Extension

Plenary

Resources

L.I- To practice using adjectives to make my writing more interesting

Must

Be able to explain what an adjective is and give an example
Should

Be able to think of some adjectives to make sentences more interesting
Could

Be able to discuss the impact adjectives can have on the story, characters and the reader



Explain that we are starting our new topic – writing stories with historical settings. Remind the children that our stories will be set in Tudor times as this will link in with our history and we now have lots of information that we can include.

Introduce the book ‘The Thief, the Fool and the Big Fat King’.

Read the first chapter (up to page 12). Ask the children to listen out for adjectives in the story. Recap what an adjective is briefly.

Scan in pages 6 & 7 and show on IWB. Re-read the extract with a partner and discuss the adjectives you can see.

Share what the children have found.

Re-read some of the sentences without the adjectives and discuss the impact it has on the reader.


Show the children the activity sheet, explaining what is expected for each section. This should be brief as there are examples.
Work through in their literacy groups at their own pace. TA to support LA group, CT to support MA, extending ideas to more interesting adjectives.

Look back at extract on IWB. Can you think of any better adjectives to give more impact.
Think about different ways of describing the girl.

Discuss how children got on with the activity and share some adjectives.
Think about the extension activity – talk to a partner about other adjectives to describe the girl. How would this change the story, for e.g a small girl with kind eyes ….she pulled a knife from the pocket of her delicate white lace dress.

‘The Thief, the Fool and the Big Fat King’ by Terry Deary.

Scanned in extract

Adjectives sheet – one between two





Lesson 2 – 9/03/10

Intro / M&O Starter

Quick Activity

Main Activity

Extension

Plenary

Resources

L.I- To use adjectives to create a character sketch

Must

Be able to discuss what we know about the characters so far
Should

Be able to add your own ideas to what you already know about your chosen character
Could

Be able to bring a character to life using adjectives to interest the reader


Recap learning from yesterday’s lesson, emphasising the importance of including adjectives in your writing to improve the characters and the story.

Read further in the story to get a better idea of the characters. Discuss what has happened to ensure understanding.



Ask the children to share with a partner what we have found out about the characters so far.
Explain that when authors are writing stories, they need to think carefully about their characters. Often they will write a character sketch – remind them of the ones we did for our playscripts. Emphasise that it is important to let the reader ‘get to know’ the characters to make them more interested in the story.
Put the example of the character sketch of Rowan up on the IWB and read together. Discuss the adjectives used. Show the next slide where the adjectives are highlighted in red.



Pick one of the main characters that we have come across so far; the boy, his father, his mother or the scruffy girl.
Use the information that we have already been given about them and add some of your own ideas to bring the character to life. This is a perfect opportunity to include adjectives!!
Have a look at some of the character adjectives and put up as a useful display.

You should include;

- Name, age and where they live

- Description of what they look like (hair & eye colour, distinctive features, fat/thin, big/little etc)

- Description of what they are wearing (colour & style of clothes)

- Their personality traits – kind, mean, gentle, patient, jealous, spiteful etc



Read through your character sketch. Is there anything you can add to it to make it even more interesting?
Check for capital letters, full stops, commas etc. Use a dictionary for any spellings you are unsure of.
Early Intervention:

Pair poor writers up with good writers and children to take turns and support each other.

Share some character sketches. Can other children pick out some of the adjectives used?
Explain that we will be doing a character sketch in the same way, for own our characters for our own story next week.

‘The Thief, the Fool and the Big Fat King’ by Terry Deary.
Example of character sketch – Rowan
Useful character adjectives display
Literacy books



Lesson 3 – 10/03/10

Intro / M&O Starter

Quick Activity

Main Activity

Extension

Plenary

Resources

L.I- To practice using powerful verbs to make my writing more exciting

Must

Be able to explain what a powerful verb is, using an example

Should


Be able to change boring verbs into powerful verbs
Could

Be able to explain what the impact of including powerful verbs has on a piece of writing



Begin by reading some more of Deary.

Tell the children that this is another lesson which will help us practice a skill to use in our story writing.

Can anyone remember what a powerful verb is, with an example? Talk partners to discuss.

If struggling, recap that a verb is a doing word, but a powerful verb is a much more exciting doing word.



Show the slide with the highlighted boring verbs. Ask the children to work with a partner to think of a powerful verb to replace the boring one with.

Go through each example and discuss ideas from children.

Show the next slide and see if the children are able to identify the adjectives in blue.


Children are to work through the activity sheet in the same way they did for the adjectives.
HA should be able to work independently.
MA work in pairs but recording own work in books.
LA work with an adult and rest of group for support.

Extend your paragraph with more powerful words. Make sure you underline all your examples of powerful verbs.
Early Intervention:

Pair poor readers up with good readers and children to take turns and support each other.

Share some learning from the lesson. Clear up any misconceptions if they have arisen.
Ask the children to explain what the impact is of including powerful verbs rather than boring verbs.

‘The Thief, the Fool and the Big Fat King’ by Terry Deary
S2S slide with powerful verbs quick activity on it

Powerful verbs activity sheet

Literacy books




Lesson 4 – 12/03/10

Intro / M&O Starter

Quick Activity

Main Activity

Extension

Plenary

Resources

L.I- To use a Story mountain to review a story set in Tudor times

Must

Contribute to a class discussion about what happened in the Tudor story
Should

Work with a partner to recap parts of the Tudor story using the story mountain
Could

Begin to consider how you could use a story mountain to plan your own story



Finish the Dreary story and discuss what has happened and any opinions on the story.

Explain that we will be using a Story mountain as a tool to plan our stories. As a practice we will review the Dreary story using the story mountain. On Monday we will be using it to plan our own stories.

Show the children the enlarged version of the story mountain and talk through the stages. Do the beginning part together. Discuss briefly the build up and problem but don’t give too much away!


In mixed ability pairs, use the story mountain to recap the plot of the rest of the story. This will help to get some speaking and listening practice in too. Take turns to write and remember to value each other’s ideas.

Start to think about how you would use the story mountain to plan your own story. Think about plot and characters and what the dilemma could be – remembering that it will be set in Tudor times.

Early Intervention:

Pair poor writers up with good writers and children to take turns and support each other.

Share some ideas of how the Dreary story fits into the story mountain.
If anyone made it onto the extension, are they willing to share their initial ideas?
Remind them that Monday’s lesson will be spent planning stories using the story mountain.

‘The Thief, the Fool and the Big Fat King’ by Terry Dreary.
A3 version of story mountain
A4 story mountains – one between two





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