Literacy Year 1/2: Spring – Weeks 1-3 Narrative: Unit 3A/2b traditional Tales



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Literacy Year 1/2: Spring – Weeks 1-3 Narrative: Unit 3A/2B Traditional Tales





Objectives

Text/Speaking/Listening


Word/Sentence

Independent group activities

Outcomes

These plans run alongside a structured synthetic phonics programme. Hamilton Code-Breakers, which fits all the Rose criteria, is available from the English section of the Hamilton website.

The video of the Oral Story Cinderella needs to be obtained from the English section of the site. You will need to set up a ‘Working Wall’ on which to display chn’s work as they go through this three week unit on Traditional Tales. Also keep a table of Traditional Tale stories in different picture book versions.’

Week 1 Monday

Main focus: Read & compare fairy tale stories.

1/2 Express views on how a story has been presented.

1/3 Explain views to others.

1/7 Recognise main elements that shape texts.

1/8 Comment on events & characters.

2/1 Speak with clarity & use approp. intonation reading

2/2 Respond to books by describing characters.

2/8 Explain reaction to texts.

2/8 Engage with books.

2/3 Listen to each others views & preferences.


Show the video of the oral story: Cinderella (plan resource). Listen carefully and ask chn if they already knew the story. They may well have heard it or seen it before. Explain that it is a traditional tale. This means it has been told in many different ways and many different people in different countries all around the world. Each version of it is different. Tell chn they will be looking at different versions of the story. Explain that we often call this type of traditional tale a ‘fairy story’. This is because this type of traditional tale often involves magic and fairy wonder. So in Cinderella, the story relies on the fairy godmother. Fairy stories also commonly involve princesses or princes, and castles. Discuss which other fairy stories chn have heard, seen or read.
Easy
Look at the ‘Lift the flap’ Cinderella together as a group. Ask chn to comment on the story & illustrations as you read. Discuss how this version of the story is the same/different from other ones they have heard. TD

Medium / Hard

Chn work in threes (mixed ability with one able reader in each group) to share either ‘First Fairy Tales’ (Margaret Mayo) or Ladybird version of Cinderella. Encourage the able reader to show awareness of the group by reading clearly and with expression and showing the group the illustrations. Chn share their views on this version of the story, ensuring all chn contribute to discussion.



Children can:

1. Listen and respond to stories read.

2. Compare well known stories.

3. Contribute to group discussions.


Plenary

Discuss the different versions chn read. Compare them with the story they listened to. Which version did the chn prefer?

Week 1 Tuesday


Main focus: Compare stories and characters.

1/3Take turns to speak, listen to others’ suggestions.

1&2/7 Identify main events & characters in stories/draw ideas together.

2/2 Respond to stories by describing characters.

2/3 Listen to each others views & preferences.

2/9 Draw on knowledge of texts in deciding what to write.

2/8 Explain their reactions to texts, commenting on important aspects.


Read chn the Perrault version of Cinderella. Show the wonderful illustrations by Loek Koopmans. At the end, explain that this version is generally agreed to be the first version of Cinderella that was written down in Europe. Before this version, the story was told orally, and handed down by being told. Charles Perrault was supposed to be the first person to write it down. Talk to chn about the differences between this version and the one read yesterday. What parts of the story are the same? (Cinderella, bad sisters/stepmother) Different? (fairy godmother, prince).

Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn work in pairs. One child in each pair will draw an ugly sister and the other will draw Cinderella. As they draw they discuss the differences between their characters. Chn then complete a caption for their picture which will be displayed under both their drawings on the ‘working wall’. All chn use a writing structure for their caption: The ugly sisters are _________ but Cinderella is ____.

Y1 chn complete the caption with words

Y2 chn to write a more detailed description.


TD as necessary with either group


Children can:

1. Identify similarities and differences between different versions of a story.

2. Compare characters in stories.

3. Write a short caption.




Plenary

Choose chn to describe the differences between Cinderella and the ugly sisters.


Week 1 Wednesday


Main focus: Compare film and story versions of a traditional tale

1/2 Watch movies & express how a story was presented.

1&2/7 Identify main events/characters in stories/draw ideas together.

2/2 Respond to stories describing characters.

2/3 Listen to each others views.

2/8 Explain their reactions to stories, commenting on important aspects.



This session will involve chn watching the DVD of the Disney Cinderella.

Look again at the different versions of Cinderella read so far. Remind chn which ones they liked best. Show the film of Cinderella. Ask chn to pay particular attention to the characters of the Fairy Godmother and the Prince in the film.



Easy /Medium / Hard

Watch the film together. Encourage and praise good listening skills. Can chn remember and recount different parts at the end of the film? Have they paid attention to the characters of the Fairy Godmother and the Prince?


Children can:

1. Identify similarities and differences between characters in different versions of a story.


Plenary

At the end of the film, discuss how the characters of the Fairy Godmother and the Prince differed from those in the story.


Week 1 Thursday


Main focus: Compare stories

1/7 & 2/8 Identify and comment on main events & characters

1/7 Recognise main elements that shape different texts.

2/8 Explain their reactions to texts, commenting on important aspects.

2/7 Draw together ideas from a text.

2/7 Give reasons why things happen or characters change.



Read a non-European version of Cinderella (see resources for choices). Look at the pictures. Discuss where this version of the story is set. (South Africa, Caribbean, China) How can we tell? Read the story carefully and talk briefly about the differences and similarities with the European versions.

Easy /Medium/Hard

Chn work in pairs to compare the different versions of Cinderella. Chn use the prompt sheet (plan resource) to discuss the equivalent characters in the story they have just listened to. Perhaps a character is missing or the role is fulfilled in another way. Chn also discuss the plot – What happens in the story that is different? After discussions…

Y2: Write one or two sentences about what is different about this version of the story.

Y1: draw a picture to represent a difference. TD where necessary


Children can:

1. Identify similarities and differences between characters and plots from different versions of the same story.


Plenary

Take feedback about the differences in different versions


Week 1 Friday


Main focus: Write a character profile.

1/2 Listen to stories & express views.

1/8 Visualise & comment on events, characters & ideas.

1/7 Identify main events & characters in stories.

2/1 Tell real & imagined stories using familiar story language.

2/2 Respond to books read by describing characters.

2/8 Explain their reactions to texts, commenting on important aspects.

2/8 Engage with books through exploring & enacting interpretations.

2/7 Draw together ideas from across a whole text.


Remind chn of the film of Cinderella. Recap the different characters in the story. What other fairy stories do chn know? Write a list on f/c. Where have they heard or seen these stories? (TV, Film, books) Discuss any chn know & how the stories are similar in characters or plot (they all have good & bad characters, some involve magic, they all have a happy ending). Underline Sleeping Beauty on list of fairy tales. Who has heard of this story? Briefly discuss the characters & plot of the story. Show a picture book version of Sleeping Beauty. Read the story with plenty of expression. Was it how chn remembered the story?

Easy /Medium / Hard

Chn work in small groups to discuss the character of the Fairy Godmother from Cinderella and the good fairy in Sleeping Beauty. What do they have in common? (both kind, wanted to help their godchild) Chn write a character profile on one of the fairies (plan resource). Chn write descriptive sentences about their chosen fairy character to complete the profile.

Easy/Med – Write words and short sentences. TD

Hard – Write in complete sentences.


Children can:

1. Compare characters in a story.

2. Contribute to group discussions.

3. Write in complete sentences.

4. Write descriptions using appropriate vocabulary.


Plenary

Take feedback on these two characters. What is their role in the story? (to ensure a happy ending!)







Objectives

Text/Speaking/Listening


Word/Sentence

Independent group activities

Outcomes

These plans run alongside a structured synthetic phonics programme. Hamilton Code-Breakers, which fits all the Rose criteria, is available from the English section of the Hamilton website.

Essential texts are the Princess and the Pea by Mini Grey ISBN 978-0-099-43233-3 and by Lauren Child ISBN 978-0-141-50014-0

Week 2 Monday

Main focus: Act out a familiar story.

1/1 Tell stories in an audible voice.

1&2/1 Retell using story lang.

1&2/4 Act well known stories using voices for characters.

1&2/4 Discuss a performance.

1&2/4 Explore familiar themes & characters through role-play. 2/8 Engage with books through enacting interpretations.

2/1 Speak with clarity & use intonation when reciting texts.


Beforehand, read/ rehearse oral story The Princess and the Pea (plan resource). Tell the class the story – make it exciting by adding detail. Discuss. Choose chn to describe what happened in each part in their own words. Explain the differences between how we tell a story and how we write it. Explain to chn that they will be acting it out in groups. Rehearse story stages (1) There is a prince who lives in a castle by the sea. (2) The king & queen want to find a real princess for him to marry. (3) The queen makes up a special bed with 20 feather mattresses and a pea hidden underneath them all. (4) Lots of princesses come but none of them feel the pea. They are not real princesses. (5) A princess arrives in the middle of a storm. She does feel the pea under the mattresses. (6) The prince marries the real princess!

Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn work in mixed ability groups of 4-5. Chn use the sheet provided giving the stages of the story in pictures (plan resource pdf). Each member of the group takes on a different part. Chn rehearse acting out the story. Remind chn of the type of language they need to use, particularly at the beginning and the end of their ‘play’. (once upon a time, happily ever after) Encourage good role play skills, expressive speaking & audible voices. TD where necessary


Children can:

1. Act out part of a familiar story to an audience.

2. Develop & use good role play skills.

3. Take on the role of a story character.

4. Work co-operatively with others.


Plenary

Chn share really good parts of their acting of the story. Ask audience to make positive comments about the performance.


Week 2 Tuesday


Main focus: Retell a familiar story through dialogue.

1/2 Listen to stories & express views.

1/8 Visualise & comment on events, characters & ideas.

2/1 Tell imagined stories using familiar story language.

2/8 Explain their reactions to texts, commenting on important aspects.

2/8 Engage with books through exploring & enacting interpretations.

2/7 Draw together ideas from across a whole text.

Read The Princess and the Pea by Lauren Child. Discuss how the words and dialogue (what is said) can change but what happens in the story stays the same. What are differences between Lauren Child’s version and the one we acted out yesterday? Draw two heads on f/c. One is the King and one is the Queen. Tell chn they are going to think of something they might say to each other at the start of the story. Draw a speech bubble for the king. Model writing ‘We need to find a wife for the prince to marry’. Then draw a speech bubble for the queen and model writing ‘I will make sure she is a REAL princess!’ Discuss why REAL is in capital letters (for emphasis). Point out how Lauren Child uses the different types of fonts for emphasis. Y1 chn go to do their activities.

Most Y2 Stay on carpet for Hard activity. .

Easy

Chn use sheet provided to write dialogue for king and queen at the start of the story (plan resource pdf part 1). Chn then draw the prince and write what he says. Chn can use f/c to help them.

Med

Chn work in pairs with a sheet to write dialogue for a particular part of the story (plan resource pdf parts 1-5). Each pair should be given a different part of the story so that at the end all the groups can contribute to the class book where the story is told in dialogue.



Hard – still on carpet

Point out in Lauren Child’s book how speech can be written using speech marks. Demonstrate how to write the dialogue between the king and queen using the speech marks. TD



Children can:

1. Retell a familiar story in own words.

2. Write dialogue in speech bubbles.

Hard

3. Recognise and use speech marks to write dialogue.



Plenary

Ask Med group to share their dialogues. Put them in order to make a class book of the Princess and the Pea.



You will need the Lauren Child, the Mini Grey and several other versions of the Princess and the Pea for Wednesday’s session.

Week 2 Wednesday

Main focus: Read/compare fairy tales.

1/2 Express views on how a story has been presented.

1/3 Explain their views to others.

1/7 Recog. main elements shape texts.

2/2 Respond by describing characters.

2/8 Engage with books.

2/3 Listen to each others views/prefs.

2/8 Read whole books on their own.

2/1 Explain ideas/imaginative vocab.


Read The Princess and the Pea by Mini Grey. As you read this, quietly point at the gardener-girl we see through the window on pages 7/8, 11/12, 15/16. Hopefully chn will realise that this is the girl who turns up at the door the next night. Look at end. The prince & his bride are gardening in palace allotment! Look back through book at the vegetable images on the wall paper, etc. What’s in the wedding bouquet? Discuss why this gardening focus is appropriate since the story is being told by the pea itself!
Easy/ Medium /Hard

Chn work in small groups of 2s/3s to read different versions of The Princess and the Pea (Lauren Child, Mini Grey and conventional versions, Ladybird, etc) Spread the books out and let the chn choose and read different versions. (This could be a guided reading session if appropriate). TD where necessary

Children can:

1. Read and compare different versions of the same story.

2. Express their views and preferences.


Plenary

Ask chn for their opinions on which versions of the story they liked best. Ask Y2 chn to explain why they liked it.


Week 2 Thursday

Main: Create a wanted poster.

1&2/7 Draw together ideas from across a whole text.

2/7 Explore how words are used.

1&2/12 Write legibly/with spaces between words.

1/11 Write simple sentences/with capital letters & full stops.

1/10 Write non-chronological texts using simple structures.

2/10 Use planning to establish clear sections for writing.

2/10 Use appropriate language to make sections hang together.

2/5 Spell with increasing accuracy.


Re-read parts of Lauren Child’s version. What sort of princess does the prince say he is looking for? He wants a wife who is more mesmerising than the moon, more fascinating than all the stars in the sky, and she must have a certain something’. Discuss the meaning of these words ‘mesmerising’ and ‘fascinating’. Look again at Mini Grey’s version, at page 13 – ‘Wanted’ poster. What would the king or queen have wanted to write on their advertisement for the prince’s wife? Draft a ‘Wanted’ poster with chn on f/c. What picture will we need? (castle/prince) What words will we need to use? (Wanted! A wife for the prince. She must be …) What qualities will the prince want his future wife to have? Model writing the start of the poster using the words from the Lauren Child’s version. Demonstrate writing in sentences, using capital letters & full stops & leaving spaces between words.
Easy/ Medium /Hard

Chn work in pairs or individually to design their own ‘Wanted’ poster for the princess. Chn should discuss what they are going to write on it and what picture they will need to draw. What do they want the princess to be like? The chn can use Lauren child’s words or their own or a mixture of the two.

Y2 chn must write in complete sentences. Stress that all chn must use clear handwriting with spaces between words or their poster will not be legible! TD as necessary



Children can:

1. Identify with characters in stories read.

2. Present their work neatly for display purposes.


Plenary

Chn show their ‘Wanted’ posters & read the descriptions of the princess they are looking for, for their prince.

Week 2 Friday

Main focus: Compare trad stories.

1/11 Compose sentences to communicate meaning.

1/9 Find and use new and interesting words and phrases, incl story language.

1/9 Convey ideas in simple non-narrative forms.

2/8 Explain their reactions to texts.

2/2 Remember specific points & identify what they have learned. 2/9 Draw on knowledge of texts in deciding what to write.

2/9 Make adventurous word choices.


Look back over all the versions of the Princess and the Pea. Discuss which were favourites and why? Can chn give good reasons to justify their opinions? Encourage chn to refer to the text in giving a reason. Turn to Lauren Child version and look at page where Princess looks at the Prince and thinks there is something ‘romantic, and something dramatic, and something strangely charming’ about the prince and how ‘there was a light in the prince’s dark eyes which reminded her of all the stars in the night sky.’ Discuss what chn think a REAL prince should look like. What test would they devise to make sure that someone coming to their door was a REAL prince? The queen had the pea under the mattress to sort the real princess from the fakes – What test would sort out a REAL prince? Brainstorm ideas.

Easy /Medium/Hard

Chn work in groups to discuss ideas for the test of a REAL prince. Discuss the qualities they want in their prince and use this to help them devise a test (kindness, strength, good looks, brave, money, interests). Then each child writes a short description of this. TD scribe as appropriate for some Y1 chn.


Children can:


    1. Express their views and preferences.

    2. Identify with characters from stories read.

    3. Write descriptive phrases.


Plenary

Chn each draw a picture of their prince, alongside their descriptions of the test. Display these on the working wall.









Objectives

Text/Speaking/Listening


Word/Sentence

Independent group activities

Outcomes

These plans run alongside a structured synthetic phonics programme. Hamilton Code-Breakers, which fits all the Rose criteria, is available from the English section of the Hamilton website.

Children will be preparing for a PowerPoint presentation on Friday. You may want to invite parents.

Week 3 Monday

Main focus: Write questions and answers.

1/7 Identify main events & characters in stories. /Recognise main elements that shape texts./ Explore the effect of patterns of language & repeated words.

1/11 Compose & write simple sentences using correct punctuation.

1/12 Write with spaces.

2/11 Use question marks.

2/8 Explain reactions to texts, commenting on important aspects.

2/7 Draw tog. ideas from texts.

2/10 Use appropriate language to make sections hang together.


Read Goldilocks by Lauren Child. Compare this version with others chn have heard or seen before. Is this book a bit like the Lauren Child version of Princess and Pea read last week? In what ways could the chn have told it was the same author telling this fairy story? (the way she uses different types of printing for emphasis, the way she tells the story as if she were talking to you, the use of photos) Discuss how this story is another traditional tale. It can be told in many different ways, but certain things remain the same – the man story, the characters and the repeating phrases. Rehearse these repeating phrases, writing them on f/c: Who’s been eating my porridge? Who’s been sitting in my chair? Who’s been sleeping in my bed? Point out that these are all questions. They start with a question word & end with a question mark. Rehearse the punctuation of questions & answers.
Easy
Give chn a set of jumbled words (plan resource) to make into a sentence ‘Who’s been sleeping in my bed?’ Ask chn to write this in the speech bubbles (PDF plan resource).

Medium

Chn write other questions the bears could have asked naughty Goldilocks. ‘Who’s been opening my door? Who’s been fiddling with my toys? Etc. Chn should write clearly with spaces between words & using correct punctuation.



Hard

As medium, but chn should also write answers giving a reason from Goldilocks. E.g. I played with the toys because they looked so cool! I ate the porridge because I was hungry! TD



Children can:
Easy

1. Use repetitive phrases to reconstruct simple sentences.

2. Use a speech bubble.


Medium / Hard

3. Write questions (& answers) based on repetitive phrases from a well-known story.

Plenary

Read the poem of Goldilocks (plan resource) Discuss the poem with chn.

Week 3 Tuesday


Main focus: Write questions and answers.

2/8 Engage with books.

2/8 Explain their reaction

2/9 Make adventurous language choices.

2/7 Draw together ideas

2/11 Use question marks. 2/9 Draw on knowledge of texts deciding what to write

1/2 Express views on how a story has been presented. 1/7 Recognise main elements that shape texts.

1/8 Comment on events, characters & ideas.


Read Ian Beck’s version of Goldilocks and the Three Bears – or another traditional version. Point out that the repeated phrases are the same & that the characters have not changed. How was Lauren Child’s version different? Look again at the LC version – it tells us more about what Goldilocks is thinking. It has the red shoes. Explore what makes this version different. Look at the doll that is used for Goldilocks in Lauren Child’s version. Then look at the Goldilocks with dreadlocks in Nick Sharrett’s version. How do chn imagine Goldilocks? Not so much what she looks like, but more what her character is like. To do this we need to ask her some questions!! (Explain that you have a hotline to Goldilocks and so you will be able to see that their questions get answered!) Encourage the chn to suggest a few opened-ended questions they would like to ask Goldilocks, e.g. Why did you go into the house? What did you feel as you opened the door? How did you feel after the chair broke? Create a list of words to describe Goldilocks on f/c. Discuss words with similar meanings and select those most appropriate to fairy stories, e.g. curious/ inquisitive, clever/shy, naughty/wicked etc.


Easy

Chn use picture of Goldilocks (plan resource) and write a question above the picture. Chn write the answer in a speech bubble coming from her mouth.



Medium

On a postcard (plan resource) chn write two questions they would like to ask Goldilocks. Chn need to use correct punctuation. TD



Hard

As medium, but chn also imagine and write Goldilocks’ answers.



Children can:

1. Write questions and answers relating to stories read.

2. Compare stories.

Medium/Hard

3. Use correct punctuation, including question marks.




Plenary

Collect all the chn’s questions, asking different chn to read theirs. Promise that Goldilocks will answer their questions by tomorrow!




Before the next session you will need to have written some answers from Goldilocks on the f/c. These should provide answers to the children’s questions.

Week 3 Wednesday

Main focus: Use traditional stories as a starting point

1/4 Explore familiar themes & characters.

1/7 Recognise main elements that shape texts. 1/7 Identify main events & characters in stories. 1&2/3 Take turns to speak, listen to others’ suggestions & talk about what they will to do.

Choose chn to read the answers that Goldilocks has provided. Discuss what we now know about Goldilocks’ character. What is she like? What words best describe her? Explain that we are going to plan a sequel to the story in which Goldilocks saves Baby Bear! Our story will use characters from traditional stories we have read this week or others that we know. With chn, list some ‘baddy’ characters from traditional stories: The wicked fairy (sleeping Beauty), the ugly sisters or step mother (Cinderella), the wolf (Red Riding Hood). They then think about the pattern of a traditional tale. How will this pattern work for us? (i) Goldilocks sets out through the wood; (ii) she sees baby bear in some sort of trouble. Perhaps a baddy is involved, (iii) she works out a way to rescue him; (iv) Baby Bear and Goldilocks go home safe and happy!


Easy /Medium / Hard

Chn work in groups of three/four to brainstorm ideas for their story. They will work together to act out their story – making sure they are clear about; how the story begins, what happens in the middle and how the story ends.



TD where needed.

Children can:

1. Work co-operatively in a group.

2. Share ideas and listen to the ideas of others. 3. Make a group decision for their story ideas.


Plenary

Ask each group to share the characters they have chosen to include in their story.



Before next session, download several pictures of (i) Goldilocks, (ii) Baby Bear, (iii) Some ‘baddy’ characters and (iv) a happy mummy and daddy bear! These should be placed in a bank for the chn to use electronically. You will need to be in the computer suite so that each group of chn has access to a computer.

Week 3 Thursday


Main focus: Use PowerPoint to present their ideas.

1&2/9 Select from different presentational features (on screen)

1&2/3 Work effectively in groups by ensuring each member takes a turn.

1&2/9 Make adventurous language choices appropriate to purpose of text (story).

2/9 Draw on knowledge of texts in deciding what to write.

1&2/10 Use appropriate language to make sections hang together.


Today chn are going to think about how they tell their story working together and using PowerPoint. Remind chn that our story follows the pattern of a traditional tale; (i) Goldilocks is going through the wood and sees baby bear in trouble with a baddy; (ii) she manages to rescue him; (iii) they both come home happy and safe. Explain that chn will create one slide for their PowerPoint presentation each – one page with a picture and also some text. This means that they have to break down their story into three pages. What happens first? What happens next? And then what happens? And finally how the story ends.


Easy /Medium/Hard

Chn layout and create pages in PowerPoint, making sure that they have each agreed which bit of the story they are telling on their page. They choose pictures from the bank downloaded and selected by the teacher to add to each page.



TD where needed. Additional support required.

Children can:

1. Plan with others & make decisions about what to do.

2. Select pictures & construct sentences to tell part of a story through PowerPoint.


Plenary

Ask each group to report back their progress so far and any difficulties they have encountered. Ask chn questions about how they will continue their stories in next session.



You will need to plan time on Friday afternoon when parents can come in and view their child’s PowerPoint presentation.

Week 3 Friday


Main focus: Use PowerPoint to present their own traditional story.

1&2/9 Select from different presentational features (on screen)

1&2/3 Work effectively in groups by ensuring turn-taking, supporting & moving on.

1&2/4 Act out their own and well-known stories, using voices for characters.

1&2/4 Discuss why they like a performance. 1&2/4 Explore familiar themes thro. role play.

Brief teaching – show chn a simple 3-page presentation (see plan resource). As you show the presentation, embellish the story by adding oral details to the text on the page. At the end of the presentation, explain that the text on the page is a basis for the story – we can add to it as we present our slides. Stress that chn need to write their story in simple clear sentences, correctly punctuated.


Easy /Medium / Hard

Chn work in their groups to finish their stories. Stress that sentences have to have a capital letter at the beginning and a full stop at the end. TD as needed. Additional adult support required.



Children can:

1. Work cooperatively with their group to finish stories. 2. Present stories to others with confidence.



Plenary Ask the chn to show their PP presentation to another group before they present it to their teacher/parents. This will give chn opportunity to practise adding the extra oral details and build their confidence. Each member of the group is responsible for telling their part of the story.

Scroll down for Success Criteria and book list

Success criteria for the plan – these should be selected & adjusted to match the specific needs of the class being taught.



Easy

Medium

Hard

  • Listen and respond to stories read.

  • Begin to compare well known stories.

  • Begin to contribute to group discussions.

  • Identify some similarities & differences between stories.

  • Begin to compare characters in stories.

  • Write a short caption with support.

  • Identify some similarities & differences between characters in different stories.

  • Identify some similarities and differences between characters and plots from different versions of the same story.

  • Begin to contribute to group discussions.


  • Act out part of a familiar story to an audience.

  • Develop & use role play skills.

  • Take on the role of a story character.

  • Begin to work co-operatively with others.

  • Retell a familiar story with some support.

  • Write dialogue in speech bubbles with support.

  • With support read and compare different versions of the same story.

  • Begin to express their views and preferences.

  • Begin to identify with characters in stories read.

  • Present their work neatly for display purposes.

  • Write descriptive phrases with support.

  • Listen and respond to stories read.

  • Compare well known stories.

  • Contribute to group discussions.

  • Identify similarities & differences between stories.

  • Compare characters in stories.

  • Write a short caption.

  • Identify similarities & differences between characters in different stories.

  • Identify similarities and differences between characters and plots from different versions of the same story.

  • Compare characters in a story.

  • Contribute to group discussions.

  • Act out part of a familiar story to an audience.

  • Develop & use good role play skills.

  • Take on the role of a story character.

  • Work co-operatively with others.

  • Retell a familiar story in own words.

  • Write dialogue in speech bubbles.

  • Read and compare different versions of the same story.

  • Express their views and preferences.

  • Identify with characters in stories read.

  • Present their work neatly for display purposes.
  • Write descriptive phrases.





  • Confidently listen and respond to stories read.

  • Compare well known stories in some detail.

  • Contribute to group discussions.

  • Identify in detail similarities & differences between stories.

  • Compare characters in stories.

  • Write a short caption independently.

  • Identify similarities & differences between characters in different stories.

  • Identify similarities and differences between characters and plots from different versions of the same story.

  • Compare characters in a story.

  • Contribute to group discussions.

  • Confidently act out part of a familiar story to an audience.

  • Use good role play skills.

  • Take on the role of a story character with confidence.

  • Work co-operatively with others.

  • Confidently retell a familiar story in own words.

  • Write dialogue in speech bubbles independently.

  • Recognise how speech marks can be used.

  • Read and compare different versions of the same story.

  • Confidently express their views and preferences.

  • Identify with characters in stories read.

  • Present their work neatly for display purposes.

  • Independently write descriptive phrases.



Essential Books

Lift-the-flap Cinderella Retold by Nick Sharratt (Children’s Books, ISBN: 978-0333965337 or 978-0230736122)

Cinderella by Charles Perrault (Illustrated by Loek Koopmans) (North South Books, ISBN: 978-0735814868)

The Princess and the Pea Retold by Lauren Child (Puffin, ISBN: 978-0-141-50014-0)


The Princess and the Pea Retold by Mini Grey (Red Fox, ISBN 978-0-099-43233-3)

Goldilocks Retold by Lauren Child (Puffin, ISBN: 978-0141501253)
You will need one of…

A non-European picture book version of Cinderella, e.g.



Yeh_Shen A Cinderella Story from China Retold by Ai-Ling-Louie (Philomel Books US, ISBN: 978-0-399-20900-0)

Cendrillon A Caribbean Cinderella Retold by Robert D. San Souci (Aladdin, ISBN: 978-0-689-84888-9)

Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters An African Tale Retold by John Steptoe (Puffin, ISBN: 978-0-140-55946-9)
You will need several other book versions of

(a) Cinderella

(b) The Princess and the Pea

(c) Goldilocks and the Three Bears


Suggestions include:

Goldilocks and the Three Bears Retold by Ian Beck (OUP, ISBN: 978-0-19-272540-0)

Lift-the-flap Goldilocks Retold by Estelle Corke (Child’s Play, ISBN: 978-18-4643085-5)

Goldilocks and the Three Bears Ladybird Version (Ladybird, ISBN: 978-18-4646981-7)

The Princess and the Pea Ladybird version (Ladybird, ISBN: 978-18-4646987-9)

The Princess and the Pea by Susanna Davidson (Usborne Publishing Ltd, ISBN: 978-07-4606324-8)

Cinderella Retold by Margaret Mayo (Orchard, ISBN: 978-1841211503)

Cinderella Ladybird version (Ladybird, ISBN: 978-18-4646976-3)


Sleeping Beauty Retold by Margaret Mayo (Orchard, ISBN: 978-18-4121144-2)
For an audio telling of Cinderella click the play button at the following link –
http://www.hamiltonathome.org.uk/3to5/Things2Do/ListenHere/Cinderella/106.html
The links to the websites and the contents of the web pages associated with such links specified on this list (hereafter collectively referred to as the ‘Links’) have been checked by Hamilton Trust and to the best of Hamilton Trust’s knowledge, are correct and accurate at the time of publication. Notwithstanding the foregoing or any other terms and conditions on the Hamilton Trust website, you acknowledge that Hamilton Trust has no control over such Links and indeed, the owners of such Links may have removed such Links, changed such Links and/or contents associated with such Links. Therefore, it is your sole responsibility to verify any of the Links which you wish you use. Hamilton Trust excludes all responsibility and liability for any loss or damage arising from the use of any Links.



©
Y1_Y2 N Unit 3A/2B – Spr B – 3 Weeks
Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users


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