Literacy Year 3: Summer – Weeks 1-4 Narrative: Unit 3 Adventure and Mystery



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Literacy Year 3: Summer – Weeks 1-4 Narrative: Unit 3 Adventure and Mystery





Objectives

Text/Speaking/Listening


Word/Sentence

Independent group activities

Outcomes

Read Charlie and the Choc factory by Roald Dahl to chn over next 2 weeks during a daily story time outside of literacy lessons. Weeks 3 & 4 of this block build on this story.

Week One uses Gorilla and The Tunnel by Anthony Browne. If possible it is useful (but not essential) to have four or more copies of each book to hand!


Week 1 Monday


Investigate plot structure (7. Identify the main section(s) of text)

1. Explain or give reasons for their views or choices

3. Actively include and respond to all members of the group

Explain to chn that you are starting to look at adventure stories this week. Discuss what ‘adventure’ means. Consider adjectives such as exciting, unusual, scary, funny etc. Look at cover of ‘Gorilla’. What kind of adventure do chn think this might be? Refer to list of adjectives & ask for reasons for their ideas. Read the story to/with chn, depending on number of copies available. Explain that many adventure stories follow the same structure. 1. Introduce characters 2. Introduce a problem or unexpected difficulty 3. Solve the problem by having an adventure and 4. The ending or resolution (when everything gets sorted out again). Write these 4 stages up clearly on the board for chn to refer to. Ask chn (in talking partners) to discuss what they think the ‘problem’ in this story is. Is it that Hannah is lonely? Or that her Dad is work-obsessed? Or that her present isn’t quite what she wanted? Throughout, chn should be encouraged to give reasons for their ideas.

Easy

Discuss again what the ‘problem’ in this adventure story might be. Chn write down a sentence or two describing what they think the problem is. They must give at least one reason for their idea. Sentences should be correctly punctuated. TD
Medium/Hard

In small groups (up to 4), chn discuss which parts of the story fit the 4 different stages of an adventure (as described in main lesson). Emphasise that there are no ‘correct’ answers here. Many groups will have different ideas and that’s OK. Using multiple copies of story, chn mark the start of each stage with a Post-it. [If your class are still learning how to discuss things in groups, it can help to have a couple of scrupulously honest ‘monitors’ who walk around the class, awarding groups points for good group talking behaviour. The monitors can use a checklist which they refer to for awarding points e.g. taking turns to talk, using someone else’s idea etc. See Speaking, listening, learning: Working with chn in KS1 & KS2, DfES0623-2003G].

Children can:

1. Identify the different stages of an adventure story.

2. Give reasons for their ideas.

Medium/Hard

3. Take turns to speak in a group, listening to everyone’s ideas.


Plenary

Bring together chn’s ideas of the story structure. Do all groups agree? Easy group read out their descriptions of the problem.

Week 1 Tuesday

7. Infer characters' feelings in fiction and consequences in logical explanations

8. Empathise with characters

11. Compose sentences using adjectives for precision & impact. 6. Spell high & medium frequency words



With chn, identify the characters in Gorilla. Explain to that today we are going to be detectives, hunting thro the text. What kind of a person do chn think Hannah is? Remind chn they MUST give reasons for their ideas. Ask them to read through the text, finding sentences which give us clues about her. Some of these will be quite straightforward, e.g. Hannah loved gorillas. Others will be harder to find, e.g. Hannah is lonely. How do we know that Hannah is lonely? Look at pictures and conversations in the text for clues. Discuss how Hannah might be feeling at different parts of the story.

Look at some of the adjectives chn have selected e.g. lonely, quiet, kind, imaginative, etc. Write these as a list/identify as adjectives with chn. On w/bs or paper, pairs choose adjectives to describe her Dad. How does he CHANGE in the story?

Easy

Chn write a character description of Hannah. Each sentence MUST include an adjective and a good reason for that describing word. E.g. Hannah is kind because she feels sorry for the chimpanzee in the zoo who looks sad. Chn underline the adjectives they have used.



Medium

Chn write a character description of the Gorilla. Encourage the chn to make a short list of adjectives describing the gorilla’s character first. Then they should use the adjectives to create clear sentences providing reasons for their ideas.



Hard

Chn write a comparison between Hannah’s dad and the gorilla. Are they completely different or are they similar in any way? Chn create a list of adjectives for each character before beginning their comparison.



TD

Children can:

1. Identify and select adjectives.

2. Understand and use the term ‘character’.


Medium/Hard

3. Give reasons for their ideas.




Plenary

Hard group share their comparisons. Have the other chn used any adjectives that could be useful in the comparisons?


Week 1 Wednesday


8. Empathise with characters and debate moral dilemmas portrayed in texts

4. Use some drama strategies to explore stories or issues (conscience alley)



Read The Tunnel to the class, as far as the page where Rose has to decide whether or not to go thro the tunnel. Introduce the word ‘dilemma’ – a difficult decision. Rose faces a dilemma here – what is it? What choices does she have? What do chn think might be going through her head? Ask each pair to think of at least two different thoughts which might be going through Rose’s head, as she faces her dilemma. ‘There might be something dangerous in there’ vs ‘But what if my brother needs my help?’ Choose a child to go through ‘conscience (or ‘dilemma’) alley’. The class create two long lines facing each other. Rose walks down the alley between the lines. Chn in the lines voice Rose’s thoughts (in whispers) both for and against going through the tunnel, acting as her conscience. Having walked SLOWLY through the tunnel (and LISTENED to her conscience), Rose makes her decision. See website list for DfES leaflet describing conscience alley. Repeat with other ‘Rose’s’, asking class to focus on differing elements – e.g. do chn think Jack would do the same for Rose?

Easy/Medium/Hard

Ask chn to imagine that Rose DOESN’T go through the tunnel (although from the front cover they will know that she does!). Instead she leaves a note under a stone for Jack to find when he comes out. Chn write a note to Jack from Rose, explaining why she did not follow him down the tunnel. What reasons does she give? Is Rose sorry? Does she say she will come back to the tunnel? [Hand out torn-off pieces of paper for chn to write their notes on.]. As chn write, share individual good ideas aloud with the whole class from time to time. (This can help keep minds focussed on the task in hand!). When finished, chn fold and leave their notes under stones around the class. Give chn a couple of minutes to wander around reading the notes. How do they think Jack would feel if he found the note?


Children can:

1. Look at a dilemma from a character’s point of view.

2. Explore endings which are different from the original ending of a story.

3. Listen to other people’s ideas to help them make up their own minds.



Plenary

Put a child in the hot seat (as Rose). Jack has never reappeared and Rose is being questioned by some police officers in her house about what happened. Other chn, pretending to be the police, question Rose about her actions that morning.


Week 1 Thursday


7. Infer characters' feelings in fiction

8. Empathise with characters

4. Use some drama strategies to explore stories or issues (conscience alley)


Read the rest of The Tunnel to the chn. Look at the adventure story structure discussed on Monday. Who are the characters in The Tunnel? What is the problem? What is the adventure? Where do the chn think the adventure begins? Is it when the boy enters the tunnel, or when Rose does? What do chn think might have happened to Jack? How did he get turned to stone? Look at the picture of Jack as a stone statue. He seems to be running away from something. What do chn think that might have been? Brainstorm and discuss some ideas together.
Easy/Medium/Hard

In groups of 3 chn discuss what they think might have happened to Jack when he went through the tunnel.

Give chn time to create a series of three freeze frames:



  1. Jack emerging from the tunnel – what does he see? Other chn in group can be trees or other people/characters. How will Jack show fear? How will other characters show wickedness?
  2. What happened next! How will all the parts of the children’s ideas be shown in one freeze frame?


  3. Jack being turned to stone.

For the final freeze, each group’s ‘picture’ will be quite similar because it will show the same image as in the book, but the way the groups get there should be completely different.

For a more in-depth version of this lesson, chn could create props and write captions for each frame.



Children can:

1. Look at a story from a character’s perspective.

2. Listen to other people’s ideas.

3. Use a story as the starting point for imagining their own story.


Week 1 Friday


Investigate plot structure

7. Identify the main section(s) of text)

10. Signal sequence, place and time to give coherence

6. Spell high and medium frequency words


Hand out any copies of Gorillla and The Tunnel for chn to look through. Which story do the chn prefer and why? Which do they think is a better adventure?

Pin up the adventure story structure again. Briefly run through the four parts of an adventure so that everyone is clear. There are 29 story pages in Gorilla (including the pictures which are a very important part of the story!) and 24 pages in The Tunnel. Divide the class into eight groups, give each group one section of each story to look through (the character part of Gorilla, the adventure part of Tunnel, etc). Ask each group to count how many pages there are in their section. You will have to help chn decide exactly where the problem ends and the adventure begins (see plan resources for Hamilton’s opinion!). Write up the results for everyone to see. Which of the four parts is the longest? Why does the adventure take up much more time and pages than the character descriptions? What would be wrong with a story that spent 10 pages describing the characters and 2 pages describing their adventure?

Easy/Medium/Hard

Each child or pair picks a mystery story (available to them in class, or from the library or home). It doesn’t matter how long or short the story is. Chn count how many pages (or, for longer stories, how many chapters) make up the ‘opening/character introduction’, how many are in the ‘problem/unusual event’ part, how many make up the adventure and how many the ending. Make a simple table to record the results. Was the adventure the longest part in every story? Which was the shortest part?

Children can:

1. Understand the structure of an adventure clearly.

2. Understand the importance of sequence in a story.

3. Access a bank of time and sequence words.



Just like the structure, getting things in the correct order matters a lot in adventure stories. A writer has to be sure that the reader knows what is happening when. Words or phrases which tell us WHEN something happens are very useful when we are writing adventure stories. Chn are going to create a ‘bank’ of time words to use in own writing. Look briefly at some of the time words in Gorilla. Give chn five minutes to look carefully through their pages of the story and identify the ‘time’ words or phrases. Make a class bank of these which chn can access to add to.






Objectives

Text/Speaking/Listening

Word/Sentence

Independent group activities

Outcomes


Week Two uses the short film The Wrong Trousers (Wallace and Gromit) by Nick Park as well as Gorilla and The Tunnel by Anthony Browne.

For Tuesday’s and Friday’s lessons, chn need to have looked at a range of other simple adventure stories. See plan resources for a list of possible titles to help you get started.


Week 2 Monday


11. Read and analyse sentences using adjectives for precision, clarity and impact

Tell chn that today you are going to look at two descriptions from The Tunnel today which are quite similar. Enlarge the first version of An adventure (extract from The Tunnel but without adjectives, see plan resources). Do chn recognise this? Now, alongside, pin up an enlarged version of A Better Adventure (more accurate extract, see plan resources). Look at the first sentence closely. What is the difference between the two first sentences? There are no adjectives in the first sentence. Ask chn to identify the adjectives. What job do they have in the sentence? To describe the tunnel. Discuss their impact on the story. Continue through the second extract like this, identifying the adjectives. Make special note of the simile ‘still as stone’.
Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn identify the adjectives in the progressively difficult extract from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, describing Willy Wonka (see resources). When they have completed this, they use the descriptions to draw the most accurate picture of Willy Wonka they can, labelling each part using the words from the text.


Children can:

1. Identify adjectives in a text.

2. Understand the impact adjectives have on writing.

Plenary

Share and compare drawings. Are they similar? What differences can chn spot?

Week 2 Tuesday


11. Compose sentences using adjectives for precision, clarity and impact

9. Select and use a range of technical and descriptive vocabulary

6. Spell high and medium frequency words


Identify the author of Gorilla and The Tunnel – Anthony Browne. AB is also the illustrator. If possible, hand out multiple copies and give the chn time to discuss and identify the picture they find most interesting (in either of the books) and WHY. Imagine this book was on an audiotape/CD and the pictures couldn’t be seen. Look at the wordless double-spread of Rose running through the dark and frightening forest.

Brainstorm as many adjectives as possible to describe the forest and note these ideas on the board. Accept other non-adjective words, but write them in a different colour so that the adjectives stand out. Choose one, e.g. dark and model how to turn a simple sentence ‘The forest was dark’ into a simile ‘The forest was as dark as night/a cellar/a haunted graveyard, etc! Chn practise writing simile sentences starting from a different adjective. Identify the exciting or unusual adjectives from your brainstormed list.

Easy/Medium

The chn write a descriptive paragraph for the forest (or another) picture (4 or 5 correctly punctuated sentences). They should try to include unusual/exciting adjectives rather than just simple adjectives. Each paragraph should also have one or two similes, along the lines of those modelled in the lesson. At the end, ask chn to stop writing and give them a minute to read through their work. Everyone has to make one improvement to what they have written so far.


TD where needed


Hard

Chn choose their favourite picture from these (or other Anthony Browne) stories and write a descriptive paragraph, making some use of similes. [Extra challenge: Only one of their sentences is allowed to begin with ‘The’. The others have to start with different words….]



Children can:

1. Write a simple descriptive passage.

2. Understand and use adjectives to enhance their writing.

3. Write simple similes.



Plenary

Share some of the similes chn have used.


Week 2 Wednesday


8. Identify features that writers use (such as dialogue)

11. Clarify meaning through the use of and speech marks

11. Use adjectives for precision, clarity and impact

1. Choose and prepare poems or stories for performance, identifying appropriate expression, tone, volume and use of voices and other sounds


Look at the two stories, The Tunnel and Gorilla. Ask a few chn to think of an adjective to describe one of the stories and to write their word on a Post-it. Stick these Post-its to the front of the books. (Gorilla: imaginative, heart-warming, exciting adventure; Tunnel: haunting, scary adventure). Look at page from The Tunnel where Jack and Rose discuss whether or not to go through the tunnel (‘Hey come here…’. See plan resources). Explain that this is ‘dialogue’ – when two people in a story are talking. Identify the speech marks and discuss what these show. Look at how each time someone else speaks, a new line starts. Divide the class into three sections. The first read out Jack’s voice, the second section read Rose’s voice and the third read the narrator’s parts. Read the page together. Look at why the speech marks go around the words coming out of the characters’ mouths, e.g. “Hey! Come here!” he yelled, NOT “Hey! Come here! he yelled”. Jack doesn’t say ‘he yelled’.


Easy

To each group of four, hand out the long extract of the conversation between Jack and Rose (One morning…see plan resources). Chn practise reading it aloud so that the distinction between character and narrator voices is clear.



Middle

Give each group of three children an ability-appropriate adventure story (see plan resources for suggestions). They have to identify a sustained passage of dialogue and practise reading it aloud so that the distinction between character and narrator voices is clear.



Hard

In groups of three or more, children pick a passage of dialogue from another adventure story of their choice. They practise reading it aloud in expressive and interesting voices, so that the distinction between character and narrator voices is clear.



Children can:

1. Identify dialogue (speech) in a story.

2. Read aloud in an expressive voice, so that the writing makes sense to an audience.

Medium/Hard

3. Select dialogue passage from a book of their choice.



Plenary

Each group reads their dialogue aloud (perhaps, to save time and attention spans, more able groups could read it to different classes or other adults, e.g. TAs, the secretary, Headteacher etc!).



Chn should have watched The Wrong Trousers BEFORE Thursday’s lesson which will just focus on the train chase.

Week 2 Thursday

    7. Identify how different texts are organised, incl reference texts, magazines, leaflets, on paper and on screen

    7. Explore how different texts appeal to readers using varied sentence structures and descriptive language


Adventures make great films because sometimes it is harder to WRITE about something exciting happening than it is to SHOW it (with great respect to Nick Parks!). Show chn the train chase scene again from Wrong Trousers (up as far as Feathers landing in the bottle). At one point, ask chn to close their eyes as so they can focus on the music. What kind of music is it? What atmosphere does the music create? How could a writer create this? Look at sentence: ‘The train went really quickly. Gromit tried to catch Feathers’. Would chn like to read a story, written like this, or would they prefer to watch the film?! The challenge today is to write the train chase in a way that is just as exciting as the film! Together, work on the above sentences so that they are more exciting, e.g. The train whizzed around the track. Faster and faster it went. Gromit’s heart was pounding. Feathers was getting away! Compare the impact of long sentences and short sentences for writing about something exciting.
Easy/Medium/Hard

Put a print out of the pictures from the train chase on each table so all groups can see a set of pictures. Each child writes a short paragraph (four or five lines in length) to describe each of the pictures. Chn might only write about one picture or all three. The important things to include for exciting writing are:

  • Use short sentences

  • Use exciting/unusual words

  • Tell us about how the characters FEEL as well as what they DO

Children can:

1. Write a short description of an exciting adventure.

2. Begin to understand the impact of short sentences when writing.


Plenary

Chn swap their writing with a partner, who writes a comment at the bottom about what they have done WELL to make this writing exciting.

    For Friday’s lesson, chn need to have thought about and chosen their favourite adventure story, whether a film or a book.

Week 2 Friday


8. Share and compare reasons for reading preferences, extending range of books read

7.Identify how different texts are organised




Ask chn to identify their favourite adventure story – it can be in a book or a film (so LOTS of scope). Today class will be making a book to recommend adventure stories to other chn in the class/school. Enlarge the poster (see plan resources) and go through, demonstrate filling it out for Gorilla. Emphasise the importance of thinking your answers through before you write them. Model also that you are doing your best writing because this is for lots of other people to read. Slapdash or scruffy posters probably won’t get read by anyone, but carefully written sentences WILL get read because they are easy to read.
Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn use the poster sheet to create an information leaflet about their favourite adventure story ever. This straightforward writing activity can be a good opportunity to focus on handwriting. Highlight the importance of this being easy to read. Scruffiness will not be tolerated!

    Children can:

    1. Identify the structure of a well-known adventure story.

    2. Write simple sentences clearly and legibly.


Plenary

Chn can swap their posters before they are put in the book. Are there any posters which made someone want to read that adventure story?






Objectives

Text/Speaking/Listening

Word/Sentence

Independent group activities


Outcomes

Week 3 uses Charlie and The Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl. The following lessons assume that the children have had the story read to them over the previous 2 or 3 weeks.

Week 3 Monday


7. Identify how different texts are organized

10. Signal sequence, and time to give coherence

6. Spell high and medium frequency words



Chop up a list of the chapters (see plan resources) in Charlie and the Chocolate factory and give one to each child (30 in all, so possibly one per child!) Identify four areas of the classroom: one corner is Characters, one corner is problem/something unexpected, another is the adventure and another is the ending, Chn have to decide which area they and their chapter title belong in and go to that area. Discuss where everyone has ended up.

Look again at the bank of time words which you have collected as a class. How many have you got?! Can chn brainstorm any more? Are they any which are best suited to the beginning of the story? Are there any more suited to the action adventure in the middle? Which might belong at the end?

Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn are going to create a storyboard for the whole of Charlie and the Chocolate factory. Keeping their chapter titles, each child writes a short description of what happens in their chapter (no more than 2 sentences if possible!). Chn can also illustrate their description if time allows.

When this is complete, hang the chapter synopses around the class (on a washing line?). Give each child a Post-it. They add a time word to the beginning of their chapter: Once upon a time/next/later/suddenly/afterwards/eventually/finally, etc.

Look at section 7 (Inside his hut) in the Biography area on http://www.roalddahl.com (click on Roald Dahl then RD Biography) to find out how RD really did write and plan his stories.


Children can:

1. Understand the importance of sequence in a story.

2. Write a short synopsis of a chapter.

3. Identify the structure of a story.


Week 3 Tuesday


8. Identify features that writers use (such as dialogue)

11. Clarify meaning through the use of and speech marks

1. Choose and prepare poems or stories for performance, identifying appropriate expression, tone, volume and use of voices and other sounds

4. Present events and characters through dialogue



Enlarge the extract of Veruca Salt saying she wants a squirrel (see plan resources). As a class, read this dialogue through as dramatically as you possibly can, dividing chn into parts and narrator. There should be a clear distinction between the voices of the characters and the voice of the narrator. Towards the end of the extract, chn have to come up to the board and identify where the speech marks need to go.

The author Jacqueline Wilson thinks dialogue (writing down what people say) is one of the most important things when writing a book. Watch this video clip together and discuss her ideas:


http://www.channel4.com/learning/microsites/B/bookbox/writerstoolkit/char/clip3.htm

Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn have to imagine that it is their mum or dad who is with Veruca in Wonka’s factory. What would their mum/dad say to Veruca when she says ‘I’ve decided I want a squirrel! Get me one of those squirrels!’

They write the whole conversation down (‘I’m not made of money you know etc), punctuating it properly with



  • Speech marks

  • A new line every time someone new starts to speak.

Children can:

1. Read dialogue, paying attention to speech marks, etc.

2. Write a dialogue.

Medium/Hard

3. Punctuate dialogue accurately.


Week 3 Wednesday


9. Use beginning, middle and end to write narratives in which events are sequenced logically and conflicts resolved

Term 3 T10

Plan by plotting a sequence of episodes

3. Use talk to organise roles and actions


Today the class will begin planning their own extended story, which will have chapters and be presented in a book! Explain the process of writing this to the chn (see plan resources). The first hardest thing to do is to decide on your story. Emphasise that you are NOT going to be writing in detail today. Today chn are only going to come up with a vague outline. Tell the chn that their story is going to be a little bit like C&CF because the main character is a child who goes somewhere amazing/unusual and has an adventure. But each child has to decide what their character is like, who they live with, why they go somewhere amazing, what that place is like (is it in space, is it on an island, is it underground, is it around the corner, is it another house etc etc), what happens to them there and how they get back home. How do you begin? Look at the clip of David Almond explaining how he starts planning a story at http://www.channel4.com/learning/microsites/B/bookbox/writerstoolkit/plan/clip1.htm (Don’t show Philip Pullman who recommends not planning stories!) Hand out whiteboards and give chn 2 or 3 quiet minutes to write/doodle/draw some ideas.

Easy/Medium/Hard

Give chn the planning sheet, divided into four sections. Discuss why the adventure section is bigger than the rest of the sections (because this should form the biggest part of the chn’s stories!). Explain that this plan is not to be used for writing sentences in, just drawing quick sketches and writing words (frightening, wicked etc). Give chn just 2 minutes (literally!) to draw a sketch (just pencil, no colours or much detail) and to write some words for each section of their plan. After 2 mins, they have to move on to the next section. When they have done this, chn take it in turns to tell a partner what their story is about. After telling their story to someone else, allow the chn another 5 mins to make changes or additions to their rough outlines. Remind chn that Roald Dahl said that he had to rewrite his stories several times because ‘I never got it right first time’.

HOMEWORK


As homework, chn have to tell someone at home about their story and what is going to happen in it. Allow chn time to change their plans the following morning if they want to.

Children can:

1. Plan a brief overview for their extended story using pictures.

2. Explain their ideas to someone else.

Week 3 Thursday


9. Use beginning, middle and end to write narratives in which events are sequenced logically and conflicts resolved

Term 3 T10

Plan by plotting a sequence of episodes

Today chn are going to plan the first chapter of their book which is all about their characters. Show them the first chapter of C&CF ‘Here comes Charlie’. Look at what Dahl does in this chapter – introduces the characters AND the setting. Ask chn to think about WHERE their story is going to start. Give chn a minute or two to tell a partner about where their character lives. (Remind them this can be quite ordinary, the adventure hasn’t started yet!)


Look again at C&CF. What kind of things do chn think RD wrote when he was planning his characters and setting for C&CF? Model the kind of notes he might have written: four grandparents, poor, small wooden house, only one bed! toothpaste factory, house beside enormous choc factory. Charlie – loves choc, only on birthday etc. Read these notes and identify adjectives. Encourage chn to draw sketches too – chn often plan better in pictures than words.
Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn plan their first chapter, using notes and pictures. Repeat fact that the adventure hasn’t started yet. They are introducing their character before their character even knows that they will have an adventure. They should include at least 3 adjectives for their main character and at least 3 for the setting.

When chn have planned their first chapter, they tell a partner about their character and the setting for their story.



Try not to give chn too long to do this, they shouldn’t progress too far into the story structure at this stage. TD Easy group

Children can:

1. Use notes and pictures to plan their first chapter.

2. Use known stories to help them plan their own story.

Plenary
Volunteers describe their main character and the setting where their story begins.
If possible, read these plans before the next lesson. Some chn will need curbing because they will have strayed into the actual adventure. Draw a line on their plan to show at what point they should STOP Chapter 1!

Week 3 Friday

9. Make decisions about form and purpose; identify success criteria and use them to evaluate their own writing

9. Use beginning, middle and end to write narratives in which events are sequenced logically and conflicts resolved



Chn are going to start writing their stories today, just writing Chapter one, introducing the characters and the setting. Briefly model how to change notes into sentences. Emphasise that chn should say each sentence to themselves before they start writing it. Would I like to read that sentence in a book? Also remind chn to USE their adjectives! Before they start to write, show chn Geraldine McCaughrean discussing how she starts stories by engaging the reader from the beginning: http://www.channel4.com/learning/microsites/B/bookbox/writerstoolkit/begin/clip1.htm
Easy/Medium/Hard

Children write their first chapter of their extended story (either in draft or straight into the final book format. At Y3 many chn will get a bit fed up if, having planned their story, they have to rewrite a first and then a second draft later on. However, for some more able children this may be appropriate.)

As chn write (in a quiet classroom), remind them from time to time about using interesting adjectives and saying their sentences to themselves etc.

At the end of the lesson, ask chn to read their own writing. Have they left out any words by mistake? Everyone has to make two small improvements to their chapter.

TD those experiencing difficulty!

If possible, allow those who need more time the chance to write more at another time during the day.


Children can:

1. Write a chapter of their extended story.

2. Use their notes to write in complete sentences.

3. Use adjectives to add impact to their writing.








Objectives

Text/Speaking/Listening

Word/Sentence

Independent group activities


Outcomes

In Week Four, chn continue to plan and write their own adventure and mystery stories based on their reading of past 3 weeks

Week 4 Monday


9. Use beginning, middle and end to write narratives in which events are sequenced logically and conflicts resolved

Term 3 T10

Plan by plotting a sequence of episodes

3. Use talk to organise roles and actions


Give chn time to re-read their first chapter again. Do they notice anything new about it? Did they leave anything out by mistake? Give a couple of mins for minor improvements to be made.

Today chn are going to plan the ADVENTURE! Ask chn to look again at their original sketch plans so they can remember their ideas for the amazing/unusual place their character is going to go to. Give chn a minute to think carefully about WHY their character is going there. Charlie goes to the chocolate factory because he wins a ticket, Rose goes through the tunnel because Jack disappears, Wallace steals the diamond because the Wrong Trousers take him to the museum. Chn turn to their partners to tell them two things:


  1. WHERE their adventure will take place

  2. WHY their character goes there
Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn have a short amount of time to plan out their adventures using sketches and notes. Remind children that their adventure should be a bit longer than their first chapter, so they might have two or more parts to their adventure. In Gorilla, Hannah went to the zoo AND the cinema AND for some fancy food! Chn should have some notes or sketches showing WHAT HAPPENS TO THEIR CHARACTER in their amazing or unusual place. Is theirs a frightening adventure (like The Tunnel), a magical adventure (like Gorilla) an exciting and weird adventure (like Charlie) etc? Chn identify 3 adjectives they will use in their adventure and write on their plan to use tomorrow.

Again, chn tell someone else their ideas for their story when they have finished their plan. TD where needed



Children can:

1. Use notes and pictures to plan their adventure story.

2. Use known stories to help them plan their own story.

Plenary

Chn share some of the excellent ideas that they have heard from their partner.
Again, looking through the children’s plans will help you identify those who need more guidance with their writing tomorrow.

Week 4 Tuesday

11. Show relationships of time, reason and cause

11. Compose sentences using adjectives for precision, clarity and impact

Term 3 T13 write extended stories set out in chapters


It’s the Big Day – chn finally get to write the adventure part of their chapter book!

Look at the list of time words that you have compiled together. Ask chn to identify three time words or phrases that they will use when writing their adventure today. Chn write their words down on w.bs or their plans from yesterday.

Remind chn about the need for dialogue too. Look at the Augustus extract from C&CF (p97). Note the use of speech marks and a new line for each speaker. Ask chn to think carefully about a conversation which will take place during their adventure. Who will be speaking and what will they talk about? Chn should note this down on their plans or on w/bs.

Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn start to write their adventures, the middle of their stories. Remind them to include

  • Time/sequence words

  • A dialogue

Writing this part of the story is a terrific juggling act and few children will remember to include everything you have discussed (adjectives, speech marks, complete sentences, nice handwriting, accurate spelling etc). Choose one or maybe two elements for chn to focus their attention on. TD where needed

Children can:

1. Write a chapter of their extended story.

2. Use their notes to write in complete sentences.

3. Use adjectives to add impact to their writing.



Plenary
Give chn time to read through what they have written at the end of the lesson.

Week 4 Wednesday

Term 3 T13 write extended stories set out in chapters

9. Make decisions about form and purpose; identify success criteria and use them to evaluate their own writing


This day could be used for children to continue their writing of the middle section of their stories (the Adventure). Most chn will need extra time to complete this part of their story.

Alternatively, you may choose to use this lesson to draw individual chn’s attention to areas they need to focus on in order to create a second draft of their adventure chapter.



Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn read (and re-read) their writing from yesterday and make small improvements as appropriate. Before continuing to write, ask chn to swap their work with someone else in the class who reads what they have written so far and makes 2 comments: one praising comment and one improving comment. The comments could relate to use of time words, inclusion of a dialogue/conversation, use of adjectives.

Chn continue writing or redrafting, having made some changes to their work so far.



Children can:

1. Write an extended story

2. Read their own work and identify improvements.

Hard

3. Write a second draft of their stories.


Week 4 Thursday


Term 3 T10

Plan by plotting a sequence of episodes

Term 3 T13 write extended stories set out in chapters

9. Make decisions about form and purpose; identify success criteria and use them to evaluate their own writing


Nearly there! Today chn plan AND write the ending to their story. Before they do, show them the clip of Bob Swindells on how to end a story: http://www.channel4.com/learning/microsites/B/bookbox/writerstoolkit/end/clip1.htm.

He recommends having ‘a clever way’ to get your character out of their situation’. Remind chn that in many adventures the character returns home. How will their adventure end? Will it leave the reader wanting to know more? Go through the importance of saying a sentence to yourself before you write it. Lots of people make mistakes at this stage because they are so excited to be reaching the end!


Easy/Medium/Hard

Give chn a bit of time to plan the ending to their story again, using notes and sketches. When they have completed this they can start writing the ending of their adventure story. When it is finished, they can ask someone else to read it to see if it makes sense. Are their any small improvements they need to make (to spellings, including missing words, etc)?



Children can:

1. Write a final chapter for their extended story

2. Use their notes to write in complete sentences.


Plenary

Chn suggest stories which they think should be heard by the rest of class. Author reads out the story if willing.


Week 4 Friday


8. (adapted) Give reasons for audience to choose their story

After all their hard work and concentration, today’s lesson is to give chn time to create the front and back covers of their story. Have they thought of a title? Hand out some of the mystery stories chn have become familiar with. What kind of things do they have on the back cover? Short descriptions of the story and a praising comment about the story. Give chn a few minutes to think of a description of their story and write it on paper/w/bs. Offer chn suggestions for how to start ‘A haunting/magical/hair-raising adventure about…’. The description shouldn’t be longer than two sentences. Then chn ask someone who has been reading their story so far to offer them a praising comment e.g. ‘A fantastic story about an incredible adventure in space’ etc. Chn write this down for use on their back cover.

Easy/Medium/Hard

Chn create and illustrate their front cover (to include picture, title and – most importantly – author’s name) and back cover (to include description of the story and praising comment attributed to the classmate who made it!)


Children can:

1. Write a short synopsis of their story

2. Read their own story aloud


Plenary

Heap generous praise on your hardworking class!!!



A nice follow up:

Invite a Y6 class (and teacher) into your class and pair the chn up. The younger child reads their story to the older child who makes an additional praising comment on a special ‘medal’ sticker on the front of the book. Invite parents in to read these masterpieces!



Scroll down for success criteria and books and websites
Success criteria for the plan – these should be selected & adjusted to match the specific needs of the class being taught.

Easy

Medium

Hard

  1. Understand that an adventure story has stages

  2. Take turns to speak in a group, listening to everyone’s ideas

  3. Use a story as the starting point of our own writing

  4. Use suitable descriptive language in own writing

  5. Begin to take the viewpoint of a character in a story

  6. Identify dialogue in a story

  7. Write dialogue using a new line for each speaker

  8. Write a few sentences to sum up a stage in the story

  9. Begin to understand the structure of an adventure story

  10. Use time sequencing words in writing a story

  11. Plan each stage of an adventure story

  12. Write each stage of an adventure story
  • Identify the different stages of an adventure story


  • Take turns to speak in a group, listening to everyone’s ideas

  • Use a story as the starting point of our own writing

  • Use suitable descriptive language in own writing

  • Take the viewpoint of one of the characters in a story/ write in the role of this character

  • Identify dialogue in a story

  • Write dialogue, using appropriate punctuation

  • Write a short synopsis of a chapter or story

  • Understand the structure of an adventure story

  • Understand the importance of time sequencing words in an adventure story and use these in own writing

  • Plan each stage of an adventure story

  • Write a chapter for each stage in an adventure story

  • Identify and name the different stages of an adventure story

  • Take turns to speak in a group, listening to everyone’s ideas

  • Use a story as the starting point of our own writing

  • Use elaborated descriptive language in own writing

  • Take the viewpoint of one of the characters in a story/ write in the role of this character

  • Identify dialogue in a story

  • Write dialogue, using appropriate punctuation

  • Write a short accurate synopsis of a chapter or story

  • Understand the structure of an adventure story

  • Understand the importance of time sequencing words in an adventure story and use these in own writing

  • Plan each stage of an adventure story.

  1. Write a chapter for each stage in an adventure story


Books

Gorilla by Anthony Browne, Walker Books, ISBN 0744594391/ 978-1406313277

The Tunnel by Anthony Browne, Walker Books, ISBN 0744552397/ 978-1406313291

Charlie and the Chocolate factory by Roald Dahl, Puffin, ISBN 0141311304/ 978-0141322711


The Wrong Trousers (FILM!) by Nick Park, Aardman Animations

Speaking, listening, learning: Working with children in KS1 and KS2, DfES0623-2003G, published November 2003 (plan resources)




Websites

  • http://www.wallaceandgromit.net/pictures/the_wrong_trousers_pictures.php (excellent for source of pictures from Wrong Trousers).

  • http://www.channel4.com/learning/microsites/B/bookbox/writerstoolkit (a terrific resource, showing lots of well-known children’s authors discussing how they write stories in bite-sized video-clips. Worth a browse.)


The links to the websites and the contents of the web pages associated with such links specified on this list (hereafter collectively referred to as the ‘Links’) have been checked by Hamilton Trust and to the best of Hamilton Trust’s knowledge, are correct and accurate at the time of publication. Notwithstanding the foregoing or any other terms and conditions on the Hamilton Trust website, you acknowledge that Hamilton Trust has no control over such Links and indeed, the owners of such Links may have removed such Links, changed such Links and/or contents associated with such Links. Therefore, it is your sole responsibility to verify any of the Links which you wish you use. Hamilton Trust excludes all responsibility and liability for any loss or damage arising from the use of any Links.



© Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users Y3 N Unit 3 –Sum – 4 Weeks


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