Local Offer: Template for Schools/Academies



Download 129.47 Kb.
Date conversion07.06.2018
Size129.47 Kb.

Local Offer: Template for Schools/Academies
The SEN/D Reforms place a statutory requirement on schools from 1 September 2014 to make information available to young people and parents about how the school supports children and young people with SEN/D. This information will form the main basis for the school’s Local Offer, which has to be published on the school’s website. Your website must include the name and contact details of your SEN/DCO and a link to the Local Authority’s Local Offer. We are currently working on the LA’s Local Offer and we will advise you of our website link in due course.
This template has been designed by a working group of schools in Salford to help you to pull together information so that children and young people with Special Educational Needs (SEN) or disabilities and their parents/carers know what support they can expect if they attend your school/academy. You do not have to use this template but we hope that you find it useful.
The questions in the template are intended as prompts and reflect key issues that parents have told us they would like to know about when deciding which school could best meet their child’s needs. It would also be good practice to consult your own pupils, parents about what to include in your Local Offer. One Salford school has already trialled the development of their local offer and their completed document is attached as an example. The SEN/DCO led on this piece of work and other staff. A stakeholder group of pupils, parents, staff and governors provided a useful consultation group for the school
When you have completed your Local Offer, please could you complete the following details and return the document by email to Children.families@salford.gov.uk .

School/Academy Name


Mesne Lea Community Primary School

Name and contact details of your school’s SEN/DCO

  • School SEN/DCO- Mrs Fiona Zino

  • mesnelea.primary school@salford.gov.uk- Tel 0161 790 4234




We want to ensure that we keep your information up-to-date. To help us to do this, please provide the name and contact details of the person/role responsible for maintaining details of the Local Offer for your school/academy





Name of Person/Job Title


Julie Finlay- Head teacher

Contact telephone number


Tel 0161 790 4234

Email

mesnelea.primaryschool@salford.gov.uk


Promoting Good Practice and Successes

The Local Offer will give your school the opportunity to showcase any good practice you have around supporting children with Special Educational Needs to achieve their full potential. If you have any examples of good practice or success stories, we would encourage you to include these on your Local Offer webpages. For reasons of confidentiality, please do not include a child/young person’s full name in any case studies you promote.



I confirm that our Local Offer has now been published on the school/academy website.

Or


I confirm that the Local Offer will be published on ________ ( please give date)


Please give the URL for the direct link to your school’s Local Offer

mesnelea.primary school@salford.gov.uk-

Name


Julie Finlay- Head teacher

Date


16/11/16



Please return the completed form and the Local Offer document by email to: Children.families@salford.gov.uk

Teaching and Learning




  1. What additional support can be provided in the classroom?

  2. What provision do you offer to facilitate access to the curriculum and to develop independent learning? (This may include support from external agencies and equipment/facilities)

  3. Staff specialisms/expertise around SEN or disability

  4. What ongoing support and development is in place for staff regards supporting children and young people with SEN?

  5. What arrangements are made for reasonable adjustments in the curriculum and support to the pupil during exams?

  6. How do you share educational progress and outcomes with parents?

  7. What external teaching and learning do you offer?
  8. What arrangements are in place to ensure that support is maintained in "off site provision"?


  9. What work experience opportunities do you offer?




Teaching and Learning

  1. What additional support can be provided in the classroom?



  • Teaching assistants are employed and used to support and enhance learning.

  • Smaller group work to support and enhance learning.

  • Word walls and individual resources to support learning i.e. word books, key vocabulary.

  • Pre-teaching of topics.

  • Differentiated activities, learning and resources.

  • Teaching linked to pupils’ specific needs

  • We are a Dyslexia Friendly School(validation received May 2017)



  1. What provision do you offer to facilitate access to the curriculum and to develop independent learning? (This may include support from external agencies and equipment/facilities)

  • Advice from the Educational Psychologist

  • Advice from external agencies such as Speech and Language, occupational therapy, where appropriate.

  • Advice from Learning Support Services

  • ELKLAN Trained staff (for Speech and Language support)




  1. Staff specialisms/expertise around SEN or disability



  • Experienced SEN/DCO

  • TA’s trained in first class at number interventions and phonics catch up programmes.
  • CPD training in Autism, ADHD and SEN


  • ELKLAN trained Staff

  1. What ongoing support and development is in place for staff regards supporting children and young people with SEN/D?




CPD training offered regularly on:

  • ADHD training

  • Dyslexia training

  • Behaviour modification programmes

  • Sensory Processing Disorder Training

  • Supporting EAL pupils in/out of the classroom

  • EMTAS support for specified EAL pupils

  • Moving and Handling Training

  1. What arrangements are made for reasonable adjustments in the curriculum and support to the pupil during exams?




  • Access arrangements – which includes readers, scribes, extra time, small classroom where appropriate.

  • Differentiated activities, papers and resources.

  • Teachers informed of all pupils’ reading ages and spelling ages to ensure the correct level of test is administered.

  • Teachers informed of all pupils having special needs.

  • Teachers delivering Quality First Teaching as part of the Graduated Response

  • Training for readers and scribes before exams.


  1. How do you share educational progress and outcomes with parents?




  • Parents evenings

  • Informal parent drop in sessions half termly

  • School reports annually

  • Meetings with parents informally

  • Review of statements

  • Review of ISPs termly with parental input.

  1. What external teaching and learning do you offer?




Where appropriate pupils are engaged in external learning within a variety of contexts which include;

  • Residential Trips

  • Class Trips

  • Crucial Crew

  • Additional transition days at the local high school




  1. What arrangements are in place to ensure that support is maintained in "off site provision"?




No pupils access offsite provision

Annual Reviews

  1. What arrangements are in place for review meetings for children with Statements or Education, Health and Care (EHC) Plans?

  2. What arrangements are in place for children with other SEN/D support needs?




Annual Reviews

  1. What arrangements are in place for review meetings for children with Statements or Education, Health and Care (EHC) Plans?



  • Invites to all parties involved

  • Review meeting held at a convenient location

  • Review meeting held at a convenient time for parents who work/have commitments during the day

  • Consultation with staff prior to the meeting and discussion surrounding next steps and provision for the child.

  1. What arrangements are in place for children with other SEN/D support needs


  • SENDO support


  • Small class sizes

  • Small group/individual interventions determined based on half termly assessments.

  • Educational Psychologist for assessments and strategies

  • Access to Learning Support Services

  • Access to the Primary Inclusion Team

  • Access to the portage team

  • Regular meetings with Occupational and Physiotherapists

  • Health Care Plans

  • Personal Evacuation Plans

  • Wheelchair access

  • Access to a lift




Keeping Children Safe

  1. What handover arrangements will be made at the start and end of the school day? Do you have parking areas for pick up and drop offs?

  2. What support is offered during breaks and lunchtimes?

  3. How do you ensure my son/daughter stays safe outside the classroom? (e.g. during PE lessons and school trips)

  4. What are the school arrangements for undertaking risk assessments?

  5. Where can parents find details of policies on bullying?







Keeping Children Safe

  1. What handover arrangements will be made at the start and end of the school day? Do you have parking areas for pick up and drop offs?




  • Parents can wait for pupils at the classroom exit doors. Where disabled access to a car is required this can be arranged through discussion with the Headteacher.
  • Pupils with SEN/D have staff entrance and exit accessibility.



  1. What support is offered during breaks and lunchtimes?




  • At least 2 members of staff are on duty at break time who can be approached by children any time on the playground.

  • Where a statement or EHC was in place support would be offered in accordance with this.




  1. How do you ensure my son/daughter stays safe outside the classroom? (e.g. during PE lessons and school trips)




  • Risk assessments are undertaken for all school trips.

  • Pupil Specific Risk Assessments are used where appropriate

  • PE lessons are always taught by a teacher or qualified coach. Care plans are put in place where amendments are necessary for individual pupils.

  1. What are the school arrangements for undertaking risk assessments?




  • All in line with Salford LA Risk Assessment Policy

  1. Where can parents find details of policies on bullying?

  • The school behaviour and anti-bullying policy can be found on the school website and a copy can be requested from school.





Health (including Emotional Health and Wellbeing)




  1. What is the school’s policy on administering medication?
  2. How do you work with the family to draw up a care plan and ensure that all relevant staff are aware of the plan?


  3. What would the school do in the case of a medical emergency

  4. How do you ensure that staff are trained/qualified to deal with a child’s particular needs?

Which health or therapy services can children access on school premises?





Health (including Emotional Health and Wellbeing

  1. What is the school’s policy on administering medication?




  • School has a policy on medication administration, ratified and agreed by governors.

  1. How do you work with the family to draw up a care plan and ensure that all relevant staff are aware of the plan?




  • A meeting is held with the parent/carer to discuss amendment. The

  • Care plan is then shared with staff.

  1. What would the school do in the case of a medical emergency



  • Call 999

  • Contact a qualified first aider

  • Contact parent/carer or emergency contact if parent/carer unavailable

  • In absence of parent/carer a first aider would accompany the pupil to the hospital

  1. How do you ensure that staff are trained/qualified to deal with a child’s particular needs?



  • All staff are trained every 18 months on Safeguarding/Child protection
  • Relevant staff undertake external courses provided by the LA and private companies


  • Relevant staff are trained on CAF completion and other relevant documents, i.e. RIATs, EWO referrals, etc.

  • Training by outside professionals for ASD, ADHD, EAL, etc.

  • All staff receive First Aid Training every three years

  1. Which health or therapy services can children access on school premises?




  • Where a health professional requests to visit a child in school this is arranged.

Communication with Parents

  1. How do you ensure that parents know “who’s who” and who they can contact if they have concerns about their child/young person?

  2. Do parents have to make an appointment to meet with staff or do you have an Open Door policy?

  3. How do you keep parents updated with their child/young person’s progress?

  4. Do you offer Open Days?

  5. How can parents give feedback to the school?



Communication with Parents

  1. How do you ensure that parents know “who’s who” and who they can contact if they have concerns about their child/young person?



  • Parents are encouraged to attend a Meet the Teacher/Curriculum meeting prior to the child starting in a new class, where they are introduced to staff in school.

  • Contact details for the SENDCO are on the School Information Report on the website

  • Home visits are made to new Nursery and Reception pupils into school.
  • Welcome Meetings are arranged for new intake


  • Information is also available on the school website

  1. Do parents have to make an appointment to meet with staff or do you have an Open Door policy?




  • Open door policy to speak to a member of staff but an appointment will be made if they request to speak to a teacher, due to their teaching commitment. All parents are dealt with as swiftly as possible; usually on the day of initial contact or at the latest, the day after.

  1. How do you keep parents updated with their child/young person’s progress?

  2. Do you offer Open Days?




  • Parents evenings

  • School reports

  • Parents can make an appointment to tour the school

  • Informal meetings and discussions between parents and teachers/Head teacher

  • Parent drop in sessions are available half termly.

  1. How can parents give feedback to the school?



  • Via email

  • Via questionnaires

  • Parental meetings

  • Telephone calls

  • Arrange to see staff or the Head teacher at a mutually convenient time.

Working Together

  1. Do you have home/school contracts?

  2. What opportunities do you offer for pupils to have their say? e.g. school council
  3. What opportunities are there for parents to have their say about their son/daughter’s education?


  4. What opportunities are there for parents to get involved in the school or become school governors?

  5. How does the Governing Body involve other agencies in meeting the needs of pupils with SEN and supporting their families? (e.g. health, social care, voluntary groups)


Working Together

  1. Do you have home/school contracts?




  • Yes- We also have specific home/school agreements for those children who access our enhanced resource provision

  1. What opportunities do you offer for pupils to have their say? e.g. school council



  • Student Council meetings with representatives of children with SEN included are held weekly

  • Eco schools meetings

  • Pupil interviews

  • Listen to them on an informal basis.

  • Pupil questionnaires

  • Pupil voice incorporated into Learning Walks, Lesson Observations etc

  1. What opportunities are there for parents to have their say about their son/daughter’s education?



  • Parents Evenings

  • Review meetings

  • Open door policy

  • Arranging a meeting with teachers/Head teacher.

  • Questionnaires from school

  • Parent View

  1. What opportunities are there for parents to get involved in the school or become school governors?



  • Invitation via the newsletter


  • Invitation via the website

  • Letters sent to all parents when a parent governor vacancy becomes available.

  • Volunteers are in school supporting extra curricular visits

  • Volunteers are in class supporting learning,

  1. How does the Governing Body involve other agencies in meeting the needs of pupils with SEN and supporting their families? (e.g. health, social care, voluntary groups

  • Governor linked to SEN/D







What Help and Support is available for the Family?

  1. Do you offer help with completing forms and paperwork? If yes, who normally provides this help and how would parents access this?

  2. What information, advice and guidance can parents and young people access through the school? Who normally provides this help and how would they access this?

  3. How does the school help parents with travel plans to get their son/daughter to and from school?




What Help and Support is available for the Family?

  1. Do you offer help with completing forms and paperwork? If yes, who normally provides this help and how would parents access this?




  • Yes, SEN/DCO would arrange to meet with them and help them complete all the necessary paper work.

  • School Business Manager helps with admission forms and other paperwork or online assistance.

  1. What information, advice and guidance can parents and young people access through the school? Who normally provides this help and how would they access this?





  • SEN/DCO or class teacher will provide advice and guidance regarding any issues.


  1. How does the school help parents with travel plans to get their son/daughter to and from school?

  • Parent can contact school to discuss any issues arising.

Transition from Primary School and School Leavers

  1. What support does the school offer for year 6 pupils coming to the school? (e.g. visits to the school, buddying)

  2. What support is offered for young people leaving the school? (e.g. careers guidance, visits to colleges, apprenticeships, supported employment etc)

  3. What advice/support do you offer young people and their parents about preparing for adulthood?






Transition from Primary School and School Leavers

  1. What support does the school offer for year 6 pupil’s transfers to High School? (e.g. visits to the school, buddying)



  • Year 7 co-ordinator visits school to speak to pupils in Year 6.

  • Year 6 pupils visit their secondary school for transition days in the final term of Year 6.
  • Addition transition days for SEN/D children


  • School transfers all data to the secondary school about the child with all records. Year 6 teacher discusses individual pupils with the transition coordinator of the High School.




Extra Curricular Activities

  1. Do you offer school holiday and/or before and after school provision? If yes, please give details.

  2. What lunchtime or after school activities do you offer? Do parents have to pay for these and if so, how much?

  3. How do you make sure clubs, activities and residential trips are inclusive?

  4. How do you help children and young people to make friends?






Extra Curricular Activities

  1. Do you offer school holiday and/or before and after school provision? If yes, please give details.




  • Extra-curricular activities are offered on a rota system and consent letters are sent to parents when pupils are eligible to attend an after school club.

  • There is wrap around care in the form of before and after school provision which is led and managed by the school

  1. What lunchtime or after school activities do you offer? Do parents have to pay for these and if so, how much?

  • There are numerous after school activities that pupils are warmly invited to and we actively encourage pupils to participate in these. All activities are free


  • All clubs are mentioned in newsletters including the year groups the club is aimed at.



  1. How do you make sure clubs, activities and residential trips are inclusive?



  • Pupil Specific Risk assessments are carried out.

  • Trips are accompanied by qualified teaching and support staff. Where a statement or EHC was in place a 1-1 support assistant would accompany the trip where necessary

  1. How do you help children and young people to make friends?

  • SEAL programme is carried out in school.

  • Learning Mentor is employed full time

  • British Values are promoted throughout the school




Glossary of terms




Annual Review


All statements and Education, Health and Care Plans must be reviewed annually. The Annual Review ensures that that once a year the parents, the pupil, the Local Authority, the school and all professionals involved consider the progress the pupil has made over the last 12 months, and whether amendments need to be made to the statement or Education, Health and Care Plan.

ADHD/ADD

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder/Attention Deficit Disorder

ADHD/ADD is a disorder that appears in early childhood. ADHD/ADD makes it difficult for students to hold back their spontaneous responses (responses can involve everything from movement to speech to attentiveness). Students with ADD are not diagnosed as having excessive hyperactive behaviour but display all other symptoms.

Children with ADD/ADHD may be:

Inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive (the most common form)


  • Inattentive, but not hyperactive or impulsive.

  • Hyperactive and impulsive, but able to pay attention.




Assessment


This involves building a picture of your child’s abilities, difficulties, behaviour, his/her special educational needs and the support required to meet those needs. Assessment is an important part of deciding whether your child’s progress rate is as good as is expected. Teachers carry out routine assessments regularly.

More specialised assessments may be required if progress is not at an expected rate. This may be carried out by the SENCO, an Educational Psychologist or an Advisory Teacher.


A statutory assessment is a formal procedure which involves the collection of information from as many people as possible who have detailed knowledge about your child. This may lead to the issue of a statement of special educational needs.




Code of Practice


The SEN Code of Practice (often referred to as ‘The Code’) gives practical guidance on how to identify, assess and support children with special educational needs. All early education settings, state schools and Local Education Authorities must take account of this Code when they are dealing with children who have special educational needs. 




Differentiation


Differentiation is the adjustment of the teaching methods and/or resources according to the learning needs of the pupils. It can be aimed at the groups within the class or individuals. See also personalised learning.




Differentiated Curriculum

A curriculum that is specially adapted to meet the special educational needs of individual children.

EHCP

Education, Health and Care Plan


From 1st September 2014, Education, Health and Care Plans (EHCPs) will be issued instead of statements of SEN. Existing statements will be converted to EHCPs over the next three years. An EHCP has the same statutory protection as a statement but it can be issued at and maintained to any point from birth to the age of 25. The criteria and procedure for securing an EHCP for your child is detailed as part of Salford’s Local Offer.

EP


Educational Psychologist

Most, but not all, Educational Psychologists are employed by local authorities (LAs). Their main work is with schools and pre-school settings to provide advice, support and staff training for children with SEN. They may perform assessments of children with SEN and produce a report as part of the statutory assessment.




Exam Special Arrangements

Special arrangements can be made for pupils who are disadvantaged during exams because of certain difficulties such as dyslexic tendencies. Readers, scribes and or extra time can be arranged, for pupils who meet the exam board criteria, in order that the disadvantage they have can be redressed.




Exam Special Concessions

Special concessions can be arranged for pupils who qualify for these e.g. the exam paper can be enlarged or written in Braille for pupils with visual difficulties or a scribe can be used if a pupil breaks an arm before the exam etc.





Governors


Each school has a board of Governors that is responsible to parents, funders and the community for making sure the school provides a good quality education. In Academy schools the governors are often called ‘directors’.




Inclusion


Inclusion is the process by which schools and other establishments change their principles, policies, practices and environments to increase the presence, participation and achievement levels of children with special educational needs and/or a disability.

IEP

Individual Education Plan


An IEP sets out the special help that a child will receive at school or early years setting to meet his or her special educational needs (SEN). It is not a legal requirement for your child to have and IEP but it is good practice for parents and the child to be involved in drawing it up and reviewing it if there is one. An IEP should be reviewed regularly and at least twice a year. If there is no IEP the school should have another method of recording how it is meeting your child’s SEN

LD

Learning Difficulties

A child has learning difficulties if he or she finds it much harder to learn than most children of the same age.

LEA


Local Education Authority


Each council has an LEA. The LEA is responsible for the education of all children living within the council’s area and has some responsibility for all state schools in our area.  In Salford, the LEA is combined with the children’s social services departments and is known as Children’s Services. Children’s Services have the same responsibilities for educational provision for children with special educational needs as LEAs.

MLD

Moderate Learning Difficulties

Children with moderate learning difficulties have much greater difficulty than their peers in acquiring basic literacy and numeracy skills and in understanding concepts. They may also have associated speech and language delay, low self-esteem, low levels of concentration and under-developed social skills.




National Curriculum


This sets out a clear, full and statutory entitlement to learning for all children, setting out what should be taught and setting attainment targets for learning. It also determines how performance will be assessed and reported. The national curriculum is taught in a way that meets the needs of individual children, e.g. setting goals that are achievable.




National Curriculum Inclusion Statement

A detailed statement within the national curriculum, setting out the principles that schools must follow, to make sure that all children have the chance to succeed.













OFSTED

OFSTED stands for the Office for Standards in Education. OFSTED is the inspectorate for children and learners in England and they oversee the quality of the provision of education and care through inspection and regulation. They inspect childcare providers, schools, colleges, children’s services, teacher training and youth work. 




Phonics


A system of teaching reading and spelling that stresses basic symbol-sound relationships and how this works in decoding words.




Phonological Difficulties

A child with phonological difficulties finds it hard to select and use the correct sounds necessary for speech.

PD


Physical Difficulty

There is a wide range of physical disabilities and pupils cover the whole ability range. Some children are able to access the curriculum and learn effectively without additional educational provision. They have a disability but do not have a special

Educational need. For others, the impact on their education may be severe. In the same way, a medical diagnosis does not necessarily mean that a child has SEN. It

Depends on the impact the condition has on their educational needs.

There are a number of medical conditions associated with physical disability which can impact on mobility. These include cerebral palsy, heart disease, spina bifida and hydrocephalus, muscular dystrophy. Children with physical disabilities may also have sensory impairments, neurological problems or learning difficulties. Some children are mobile but have significant fine motor difficulties which require support.














Responsible Person

The person (either the headteacher/deputy headteacher, chair of the governing body or SEN/D Governor), who has responsibility for making sure that staff know about a child’s special educational needs.

SEN/DCO

Special Educational Needs Co-Ordinator

A Special Educational Needs and /or Disabilities Co-ordinator or SEN/DCO is a teacher who has the responsibility for overseeing the day-to-day SEN/D provision within his or her school. The SEN/DCO and your child’s teacher/s should work together to plan how his/her needs should be met.

SEN/D

Special Educational Needs

The special help given to children with special educational needs and/or disabilities which is additional to or different from the provision generally made for other children of the same age.




Special Educational Provision

The special help given to children with special educational needs which is additional to or different from the provision generally made for other children of the same age.

SEN

Special Educational Needs and or Disability

Children with special educational needs have significantly greater difficulty in learning than most children of the same age or have a disability. These children may need extra or different help from that given to other children of the same age. Approximately one fifth of all children may have a SEN/D at some point in their school career.





Special Educational Needs and/or (SEN/D) Code of Practice


See ‘Code of Practice’ above.




Statement of Special Educational Needs

The Statement of Special Educational Needs, or 'Statement' describes the special educational needs of a child and the help that she or he will get to meet those needs. It is a legal document that is produced at the end of a process known as ‘statutory assessment’. Only those children with the most severe, complex and persistent SEN will need a Statement. From September 1st 2104, no new statements will be written. Instead a new document – an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP) with the same legal protection as a Statement will be produced.




Statutory Assessment


This is the legal process for producing an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP). Parents, a young person over the age of 16 who is deemed capable and a variety of professionals can request a statutory assessment. Parents and/or the young person themselves if they are deemed capable, must give their permission for this to go ahead. Not all Statutory Assessments result in the issuing of an Education, Health and Care Plan. From September 2014, Statutory Assessment can be carried out at any time between a child’s birth and the age of 25, although there will be very few young people undergoing the process for the first time beyond the age of 16.

TAs

Teaching Assistants



Almost all schools now employ teaching assistants to support whole classes, small groups or individual pupils. Teaching assistants may be called other things, such as learning support assistant (LSA) or special support assistant (SSA) particularly if they support a child with special needs.




Transition


Transition is when a child moves from one setting to another, such as from home to a childminder, to nursery, to primary school, to secondary school, or from education into adult life. Planning for transition is important if your child has a significant level of need where advance preparations may need to be made in the new setting to ensure it is successful.

VI

Visual Impairment


Vision loss to such a degree that additional support is required. Refers to people with irretrievable sight loss and does not include those whose sight problems can be corrected by spectacles or contact lenses, though it does include those whose sight might be improved by medical intervention. This simple definition covers a wide spectrum of different impairments.



| Page






The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page