M 4th busd reading units of study: Grade Four 2015-2016



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M
4th
BUSD READING UNITS OF STUDY: Grade Four


2015-2016




Unit 1: – Interpreting Characters: The Heart of the Story

Timeframe: September through November

Assessment

  • Conduct reading records on students as you circulate getting to know them. Note reading behaviors. Assess levels.

Mentor Text

Tiger Rising by Kate DiCamillo

Teaching Points - Many of these teaching points can be and sometimes need to be taught over multiple sessions.

Bend 1: Establishing a Reading Life: Setting Up and Getting Going

1. Reading Intensely: Building a Foundation for Substantial Ideas

Readers grow solid ideas by reading intensely.


2. Taking Responsibility for Reading Lots of Within-Reach Books

Readers read books calibrated at the upper end of what they can understand by having ways of checking books before committing to them.


A Day for Assessment


3. Collaborating to Create a Culture of Reading: An All-Hands-on-Deck Call

Readers read books calibrated at the upper end of what they can understand by having ways of checking books before committing to it.



4. Retelling to Cement Comprehension

Readers cement comprehension by retelling only part of the book they’ve just read, then summarizing the related back-story.



5. Envisioning: Seeing and Hearing Inside the Text

Readers envision by putting themselves into the world of the book as they read.



6. Using Partners and Checklists to Lift the Level of Envisionment

Readers aim to improve skills by collaborating with a partner, setting goals, and assessing their progress.






Unit 1: – Interpreting Characters: The Heart of the Story (continued)

Bend 2: Character

7. Reading to Develop Defensible Ideas about Characters

Readers grow ideas about characters by paying attention to the character’s action, motivations, and possible character changes.


8. Developing Significant Ideas: Using the Story Arc to Notice Important Details about Characters

Readers gain insight to the characters and their stories by paying attention to details that show characters’ desires, obstacles and their responses.


9. Growing Grounded, Significant Ideas by Noticing Author’s Craft: Finding Meaning in Repeated Details

Readers grow significant ideas about a character by noticing anything the author spotlights.



10. Improving Theories by Reaching for Precise Academic Language

Readers grow insightful ideas about characters by reaching for exact, precise, true words to convey their thoughts.



11. Finding Complications in Characters

Readers build solid ideas about characters by looking for text evidence that shows this complexity.



12. Debating to Prompt Rich Book Conversation

Readers debate different viewpoints about a book by supporting his/her position with evidence.



13. Grounding Evidence Back in the Text

Readers defend and critique ideas by quoting specific passages.



Bend 3: From Studying Characters to Building Interpretations

14. Looking Beyond Characters: Studying Other Elements of Story

Readers build a larger interpretation of their book by looking at all parts and elements of the story.



15. Looking Through Many Lenses at Not Just a Scene- But at the Whole Story So Far

Readers pay attention to parts that stick out by thinking across the whole book.

16. Connecting Thoughts to Build Interpretations

Readers build thinking by finding patterns and making connections between their different ideas.



17. A Method for Crystallizing Central Interpretations

Readers build a central interpretation by considering big life issues and relating to what the book has to say about that issue.



18. Finding Meaning in Recurring Images, Objects, and Details

Readers develop complex interpretations about stories by paying attention to recurring images, objects, and details.



19. Celebration: Creating a Self-Portrait in Books

Celebrate!





Unit 2: Informational – Reading the Weather: Reading the World: Purposeful Reading of Nonfiction

Timeframe: December through Mid-February

Assessment

  • Conduct reading records on students as you circulate getting to know them. Note reading behaviors. Assess levels.

Mentor Text

Everything Weather by Kathy Furgang

Teaching Points - Many of these teaching points can be and sometimes need to be taught over multiple sessions.


Bend 1: Nonfiction Readers Commit to Learning From the Text

1. Reading and Learning With Intensity

Nonfiction readers make a commitment to learning from text by making connections between what they already know and care about and the text.



2. To Learn from Nonfiction, Readers Get their Mental Arms Around the Text

Nonfiction readers preview texts by paying attention to headings, topic sentences, and activating prior knowledge.

A Day of Assessment


3. Text Structures Help Accentuate What Matters

Nonfiction readers notice how the text is organized by paying attention to the structure (problem/solution, compare/contrast, cause/effect, and chronological order).



4. Embracing the Challenge of Nonfiction Reading

Nonfiction readers tackle the hard parts by noticing the challenges and taking action.



5. The Challenges Posed by Texts that are Structured as Hybrids

Nonfiction readers determine which lenses to read through by paying attention the structure and coding the text.




6. Tackling Tricky Vocabulary Through Reading, Note-Taking, and Conversation

Nonfiction readers figure out the meaning of unknown words by looking in and around the new vocabulary words.


7. Summary Boot Camp

Nonfiction readers summarize nonfiction writing by organizing the summary to include the main idea and key details.





Unit 2: Informational – Reading the Weather: Reading the World: Purposeful Reading of Nonfiction (continued)

Bend 2: Launching A Whole Class Research Project

8. Planning for a Research Project

Nonfiction readers work in teams by being organized and planning for research.



9. Synthesis

Nonfiction readers evaluate their research by synthesizing multiple texts.



10. Reading Types of Texts

Nonfiction readers continue their research in teams by evaluating a variety of nonfiction texts (nonfiction articles vs. nonfiction books).



11. Writing to Grow Research-Based Ideas

Nonfiction readers grow their ideas about their research topics by writing about them and connecting to what they already know.



12. Don’t Skip the Hard Stuff

Nonfiction readers tackle complex passages by reading and rereading small parts, thinking about what those parts are teaching, and using talk and writing to explain their ideas.



13. Celebration: Teaching One Another

Nonfiction readers celebrate the work they have done by teaching each other all about their learning.

Bend 3: Tackling a Secondary Research Project with More Agency and Power


14. Reading and Thinking Across two Topics: Comparing and Contrasting

Researchers study a second example by comparing and contrasting it to what they already know.



15. Seeking Out Patterns and Relationships

Researchers develop expertise on a topic by learning about the bigger field of knowledge.



16. New Topics Lead to New Investigations

Researchers ignite new inquiries by investigating their questions across a topic.



17. Readers Come to Texts With Their Own Agenda

Researchers organize information by learning how it fits with their own agenda.



18. Evaluating Sources

Researchers become experts by evaluating the credibility and trustworthiness of the sources.



19. Reading Closely, Thinking Deeply

Nonfiction readers consider author’s motive by thinking about the way nonfiction writers seem to want readers to think or feel about a topic.



20. Analyzing Craft: Studying How Non-Fiction Authors Achieve Their Goals

Researchers study texts by considering techniques and crafts used by the author.


21. Imagining Possibilities: Celebrating Activism

Researchers celebrate by sharing and presenting their research in final projects.





Unit 3: Informational– Reading History: The Gold Rush

Timeframe: Mid-February through April

Assessment

  • Conduct reading records on students as you circulate getting to know them. Note reading behaviors. Assess levels.

Mentor Text

Teaching Points - Many of these teaching points can be and sometimes need to be taught over multiple sessions.

Bend 1: Researching History

1. Researchers Orient Themselves to a Text Set

Readers take time to plan by scanning for subtopics that repeat.



2. Researchers Use Text Structures to Organize Incoming Information and Notes

Readers preview a text and organize their reading and note taking by identifying text structure (chronological, cause/effect, problem/solution).



A Day for Assessment

3. Special Challenges of Researching History

Readers of history pay attention to people, geography, and chronology by noticing who, where, and when.


4. Prioritizing- Note Taking on What’s Really Important

Researchers rank most important parts by chunking big ideas and details.


5. Synthesizing Across Texts

Readers synthesize information about a key topic by reading multiple texts and making connections.



6. The Role of Emblematic Detail in Nonfiction

Readers construct the big picture by synthesizing the facts and recording the drama of history.



7. Readers Develop Strategies for Reading

Primary Sources

Readers value primary sources by asking and answering questions about them.


8. Bringing Your Topics to Life

Readers make a scene come alive by envisioning themselves into the historical scene.



9. A Celebration of Learning

Readers will celebrate by teaching others a subtopic of the Gold Rush.






Unit 3: Informational– Reading History: The Gold Rush (continued)

Bend 2: Preparing for Debate

10. Recognizing Different Points of View

Readers form a more complex understanding of what happened in the past by paying attention to multiple points of view.


11. Finding- and Angling- Evidence to Support Your Claim

Readers determine and support their own point of view by examining historical evidence.


12. Rehearsing a Debate

Readers research both sides of a topic by stating their position, giving reasons to back up that position, and giving evidence to support each of their reasons.



13. Staging a Debate

Students will celebrate their learning by participating in a debate (teacher selected topic).



Bend 3: Engaging in a Second Cycle of Research

14. Building the Prior Knowledge that Makes Texts Accessible

Researchers prepare themselves to handle harder texts by building prior knowledge by reading easier texts first.



15. Strategies for Tackling Increasingly Complex Texts

Readers use special strategies for making sense of complex texts by previewing the text, paraphrasing what they read, and notice whether it goes with what they’ve read before.



16. Readers Study All Parts of a Text to Determine Main Ideas

Researchers determine the main ideas by looking at the introduction and conclusions to a section and any text features.



17. Readers Alter Their Strategies Based on the Kind of Text They Are Reading

Readers read nonfiction by drawing on prior knowledge of text structure.


18. Developing a Richer Conceptual Knowledge of Key Vocabulary

Readers approach new words by learning the definition and understanding how the word is used at a deeper level.


19. Questioning and Hypothesizing to Reach Deeper Conclusions

Readers question and hypothesize by considering several possible answers to their questions and drawing on their growing body of knowledge.



20. Reading History for Universal Messages, for Meaning

Readers figure out the big lessons they learn from the past by asking “what’s so important about this moment in time?”




4: Historical Fiction Club

Timeframe: May through June

Assessment

  • Conduct reading records on students as you circulate getting to know them. Note reading behaviors. Assess levels.

Mentor Text

Number the Stars by Lois Lowry

Rose Blanche by Roberto Innocenti

Teaching Points - Many of these teaching points can be and sometimes need to be taught over multiple sessions.

Bend 1: Tackling Complex Text

1. Reading Analytically at the Start of a Book

Readers see the setting by envisioning the author’s details.


2. Monitoring for Sense: Fitting the Pieces Together

Readers keep track of story elements by making note of the who, what, when, where, and why of the book.


A Day for Assessment


3. Thinking Across Timelines: Fitting History and Characters Together

Readers keep track of story elements by noticing how the characters’ timeline interacts with the historical timeline.



4. Characters’ Perspectives are Shaped by Their Roles

Readers analyze characters’ perspective by understanding the historical time.



Bend 2: Interpreting Complex Text

5. Making Significance

Readers grow ideas about the text by pausing to notice the significance of important passages as if they are written in bold.



6. Seeing Big Ideas in Small Details

Readers write about the big thing that happened by supporting their ideas with small moments, small details, and small objects found in the text.



7. Determining Themes

Readers consider theme by making connections between events and ideas and looking through the lens your interpretation creates.



8. Deepening Interpretation through Collaboration and Close Reading

Readers build deeper interpretations and are open to new ideas by having a conversation with other readers (grand conversation ideas).



9. Attending to Minor Characters

Readers deepen understanding by imagining the perspectives of even the minor or absent characters.

10. Self- Assessing Using Qualities of a Strong Interpretation

Readers build interpretations by drafting and revising their ideas and comparing them to qualities of a strong interpretation.






4: Historical Fiction Club (continued)

Bend 3: The Intersection of Historical Fiction and History

11. Turning to Primary Sources to Better Understand History

Readers study primary sources (maps, photographs, expository texts, and illustrations) by synthesizing them into relevant parts of their novel.



12. Turning Reading into a Project: Add Background Information to Deepen Understanding

Readers spark new ideas by reading relevant nonfiction alongside their fiction.



13. Readers Learn History from Historical Narratives

Readers get new ideas about their novel by reading historical narratives.



14. Some People’s Perspective Is Not All People’s Perspective

Readers understand character’s perspective by revising any overgeneralized thought or assumption.


15. Seeing Power in Its Many Forms

Readers deepen their thinking by investigating power dynamics in their stories.


16. Finding Thematic Connections across Texts

Readers deepen their understanding by look for similar themes across different books.



17. Celebration

Readers celebrate by discussing how being educated about history helps us understand human nature.





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