Makerere University



Download 1.26 Mb.
Page1/12
Date conversion01.11.2017
Size1.26 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   12



Makerere University



Faculty of Technology

Department of Civil Engineering



Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering

Curriculum for Accreditation

October 2010
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Faculty of Technology 1

Department of Civil Engineering 1

TABLE OF CONTENTS 2

CIV4206 Introductory Dynamics of Structures 81

10 RESOURCES 85




      1. Force, mass and acceleration

      2. Work and energy

      3. Impulse and momentum

Learning Outcomes

On completing the course the student should be able to:



  • Construct free body diagrams and calculate reactions necessary for static equilibrium

  • Use kinematic and kinetic analyses as well as energy and momentum methods in solving the several dynamic problems encountered in Engineering

  • Calculate centroids and moments of inertia

  • Appreciate internal forces in loaded structural members and construct shear, axial and bending moment diagrams

Mode of teaching/delivery

The course shall be conducted through lectures and tutorials.

Mode of Assessment

Assessment will be done through continuous interim assessments (assignments and tests) and a final examination. Interim assessment will carry a total of 40% and final examination will carry 60% of the final grade mark.

Proposed Staff

Mr. Richard Kizza Mr. Apollo Buregyeya

Reading/Reference Materials


    1. Andy Ruina and Rundra Pratap: Introduction to Statics and Dynamics, Oxford Press, 2002

    2. Beer and Johnson: Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8th Ed. McGraw-Hill, 2007

    3. R.C. Hibbeler: Engineering Mechanics: Statics and Dynamics, 11th Ed, Prentice Hall, 2007

    4. J.L Meriam and L.G. Kraige: Engineering Mechanics: Statics, Vol.1, 5th Ed., John Wiley, 2003

    5. J.L Meriam and L.G. Kraige: Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics, Vol.2, 5th Ed., John Wiley, 2003


EMT1104 Information Communication and Technology I

Hours per Semester

Weighted Total Mark

Weighted Exam Mark

Weighted Continuous

Credit Units



Assessment Mark










LH

PH

TH

CH

WTM

WEM

WCM

CU

45

30

0

60

100

60

40

4

Course Description

This course draws upon evolution of Information Communication Technologies as a precursor to applications of computers in day-to-day life. This is critical for any student going into the field of engineering.

Objectives



  • To discuss the evolution of the computing and information communication technology,

  • To enable students identify the types of computers,

  • To enable students identify the hardware components of the computer,
  • To enable students execute basic office automation tasks including word processing, working with spreadsheets and preparing computer-aided presentations,


  • To introduce students to browsing of the internet and use of email.

Course Content






[2CH]

1.
Introduction and Overview





  1. Definition of Information and Communication Technology

  2. History and Evolution of Computing and Information Communication Technology

  3. The changing role of Information and Communication Technology in society

  4. Current domains of application of Information Communication Technology: Mobile Communication, Broadcasting, Internet, Enterprise applications, Office automation, Specialised Applications (Engineering, Entertainment, Simulation etc.)

2. The Computer [3CH]

  1. Definition of a computer, Types of computers, Elements of Computer Information Systems (CIS)


  2. [6CH]
    Introduction to components of the computer: the user, hardware and the software

Personal Computer Hardware

  1. Motherboard, Child-boards, and Circuitry

  2. Central Processing Unit: Control Unit, Registers and the Arithmetic Logic Unit

  3. Storage: Memory and Auxiliary Storage

  4. Buses: Types, USB and its advantages

  5. Chassis

  6. Peripherals: Input and Output devices

  7. Expansion cards

  8. Power Supply and the Un-interruptible Power Supply (UPS)

  9. Connectors





Definition

Firmware






[2 CH]

Types of firmware: BIOS and others





Definition Evolution

System software (operating systems, device drivers, utilities and file management) Application software (definition and categorization) Software development tools


Software














[4CH]

Licensing (Proprietary, Shareware, freeware, General Public License (GPL))





Office Automation [2CH]

  1. Definitions

  2. Benefits of office automation

  3. Overview of office automation tools (Personal Information Management, Office Suites)

Word Processing

  1. Definition and Evolution

  2. Types of Word Processors

  3. Features of a word processor

  4. Word processing exercise

Spreadsheets

  1. Definition and Evolution

  2. Limitations of spreadsheets

  3. Features of a spreadsheet

  4. Types of spreadsheet applications

  5. Spreadsheet exercises

Presentations

  1. Definition

  2. Preparation

  3. Features of presentation packages


  4. [6CH]

    [8CH]


    [4CH]
    Presentation exercise



    1. Email and Browsing the Internet [8CH]

      1. Definition of the Internet

      2. Uses of the Internet

      3. Netiquette

      4. Internet Browsers

      5. Search engines and Web directories

      6. Email (Definition, Composing, Sending, Archiving, etc.)

      7. Email clients

      8. Information Literacy and lifelong learning (Definition and Implications of Internet Resources)

    2. Practicals [15CH]

Learning Outcomes

On completing the course the student should be able to:



  • Identify different types of computers

  • Identify and utilize the main computer ICT tools

  • Produce appropriately formatted documents in his/her own style using available ICT tools

  • Analyze scientific data

  • Utilize acquired skills in communication and efficient data management in everyday life Mode of teaching/delivery

The course shall be conducted through lectures, tutorials and practical sessions. Mode of Assessment

Assessment will be done through continuous interim assessments (assignments, practicals and tests) and a final examination. Interim assessment will carry a total of 40% and final examination will carry 60% of the final grade mark.



Proposed Staff Dr. Bennie Mangeni Mr. Martin Tumutungire

Reading/Reference Materials



    1. Computer Appreciation by T.F Fry

    2. How Computers Work by Ron White


    3. Information and Communication Technology in organizations by Harry Bauwman et al 2005




    1. The Internet

    2. International Computer Driving Licence (ICDL)

    3. Information and Communication Technology by N.Sareen 2005


TEC1101 Communication Skills for Technology

Hours per Semester

Weighted Total Mark

Weighted Exam Mark

Weighted Continuous Assessment Mark

Credit Units

LH

PH

TH

CH

WTM

WEM

WCM

CU

45

0

0


45

100

60

40

3




Course Description

The applications of engineering occur in society, as thus effective communication to varied audiences and clientele is a key virtue a civil engineer must possess. Communication is a tool through which work gets done, ideas get sold and defended. This course introduces to students the principles of organization, development, and writing of technical documents; and instills in them skills of listening, speaking and interaction.

Objectives



  • To impart effective skills in reading, listening, speaking and interaction

  • To enable the student prepare technical and academic documents

  • To enhance the student's capacity to effectively deliver Public and Formal Oral Presentations using appropriate Visual and Computer aids

Course Content

1. Interpersonal Skills [15CH]



  1. Reading both individual and public

  2. Listening Skills

  3. Speaking, Interaction, and Conversational Skills

  4. The Concept Team Work

  5. Inter-Office and Intra-Office Communication

  6. Conduct of Discussions and Dynamics of Meetings

2. Writing and Documentation Skills [15CH]

  1. Note-taking

  2. Writing Minutes

2. 3 Writing Notice of Meeting and Agenda

    1. Preparing Formal Documents (Resume, Application Letters, Acceptance Letters, Resignation Letters, Memos, Circulars, Responses, Letters of Introduction etc)


    2. Development of Technical and Academic Documents (Theses, Proposals, Dissertations, Laboratory Reports, Papers, Articles, Abstracts)

3. Oral Presentation Principles [15CH]

  1. Visual and Computer-assisted presentation

  2. Analysis and Design of Web Presentation

  3. Choice and use of appropriate presentation tools

  4. Organizing and presenting effective talk

Learning Outcomes

On completing the course the student should be able to:



  • Speak professionally in varied speaking situations

  • Listen beyond the verbal word

  • Read and write professionally to suit different register

Mode of teaching/delivery

The course will be conducted through a mixture of lectures, group discussions and reading assignments. Basic lecture materials and data will be provided by the Lecturer and this will be supplemented by individual reading effort by students.

Mode of Assessment

Assessment will be done through continuous coursework and final written examination. Continuous assessment will include assignments, classroom tests and practical exercises. A final examination will be offered at the end of each semester. Coursework will carry a total of 40% and a written examination will carry 60%. Coursework marks will be divided into: assignments-15%, attendance-5% and written tests-20%.

Proposed Staff

Mr. Joseph Magongo

Reading/Reference Materials

    1. Meriwether, W. (1998). Writing Essays: Strategies for success, National Textbook Company


    2. Steinberg, S. (2003). Introduction to Communication Course Book One, Juta & co. Lonsdowe

    3. Hargie, O, & Dickson, D & Tourish, Dennis, (1999) Communication in Management, Gower Publishing Limited.

    4. Sussams, J. (1998). How to Write Effective Reports. London. Gower Publishing Ltd

    5. Steyn E & Van Der Merwe (1998). A Guide to Effective Spoken and Written Communication. Cape Town. Juta and Co. Ltd


EMT1201 Engineering Mathematics II

Hours per Semester

Weighted Total Mark

Weighted Exam Mark

Weighted Continuous Assessment Mark

Credit Units

LH

PH

TH

CH

WTM

WEM


WCM

CU

60

0

0

60

100

60

40

4




Course Description

Against the foundation of the Calculus and Algebra covered in Engineering Mathematics I, this course develops the fundamental aspects of Mathematical Analysis critical to Engineering. The major themes include; Ordinary Differential Equations, Real Analysis, and Numerical Analysis.

Objectives



  • To introduce students to the concept of Single Predictor-Response mathematical modelling in areas such as electrical circuit problems and vibratory and oscillatory mechanical systems

  • To expose students to analytical solutions of classical ordinary differential equations in mathematical physics.

  • To expose students to the fundamentals of Real Analysis.

  • To introduce students to the foundations of Scientific Computing and Numerical Analysis. Course Content

1. Ordinary Differential Equations [16CH]

  1. Definition of Differential Equations

  2. Definition and Classification of Ordinary Differential Equations
  3. Formulation of Ordinary Differential Equations - electrical circuit problems and vibratory and oscillatory mechanical systems.


  4. Solution Techniques for First Order ODE's

  • Method of Separation of Variables

  • Methods for Exact Equations

  • Equation Reducible to Exact Form (The Integrating Factor)




  • Applications to electrical circuit problems and vibratory and oscillatory mechanical systems

  1. Solution Techniques for Higher Order ODE's

  • The General nth Order ODE

  • Existence and Uniqueness of Solution of Linear Equations

  • Second Order Homogeneous ODE's with Constant Coefficients (auxiliary equation and method of variation of parameters)

  • Second Order Non-Homogeneous ODE's with Constant Coefficients (The Complimentary and Particular Solution, Method of Undetermined Coefficients)

  • Special Cases (Equations Reducible to 1st Order or 2nd Order with Constant Coefficients)

  • Applications to electrical circuit problems and vibratory and oscillatory mechanical systems

  1. Solutions of Systems of Linear First Order ODE's






[16CH]
2. Real Analysis




Sequences - Definitions and Examples. Convergence of Sequences, Sequences of Real and Complex Numbers. Some Limit Theorems of Sequences.

Series - Definition, Series as a Summation of Terms of a Sequence, Necessary Condition for Convergence, Sufficient Conditions for Convergence (Cauchy's nth Root Test, D'Alembert Ratio Test, Comparison Test), Convergence of Series with Negative Terms, and Absolute Converge

Power Series - Definitions, Maclaurin's and Taylor's Series and Approximations, Arithmetic Operations on Power Series (Sum, Products, Shifting of Summation Indices, and Differentiation), Convergence (Radius, Interval and Tests)

Differentiability, Rolle's Theorem, The Mean Value Theorem, Cauchy's Mean Value

Theorem, Proof of L'Hospital's Rule

Proof of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus

Riemann Integral-Definition and Characteristics

2.1

2.2

2.3






  1. 2.7
Fourier Series - Motivation, Definition, Existence, Fourier Series of General Functions (of period 2n or arbitrary), Fourier Series of Odd and Even Functions, Half-Range Fourier Series Expansions, Determination of Fourier Series without Integration. Dirichlet's Theorem (Limit theorems). Application of Fourier Series to Electric Circuits.






[14CH]

3.
Scientific Computing and Numerical Analysis using MATLAB and Spreadsheets





  1. Definition and Rationale for Scientific Computing

  2. Error Analysis

  3. Numerical Solutions of Polynomial Algebraic Equations, Interpolation Formulae

  4. Numerical Differentiation and Integration, Trapezoidal and Simpson's Rules of Integration

  5. Numerical Solutions of Ordinary Differential Equations: Euler method, Modified Euler method and Runge-Kutta

4. Vector Analysis [14CH]

  1. Scalar and Vector Fields

  2. Classification of vector fields

  3. Scalar and Vector Functions

  4. Directional Derivatives of Scalar Functions and Derivatives of Vector Functions

  5. Gradient, Divergence, Curl and Laplacian of Vector Functions

  6. Physical Interpretation of the Divergence and the Curl of a Vector Field

  7. Green's theorem, Line Integrals Independent of Path, Exact Differential Forms


  8. Differential length, Area and Volume; Line, surface and Volume integrals

  9. Coordinate systems and Transformation: Cartesian; Cylindrical; Spherical coordinate

Learning Outcomes

On completing the course the student should be able to:

■ Relate mathematics further to the physical world, providing a sound basis for later specialization


  • Acquire extra persistence and manipulative skills required by engineers

  • Analyze a variety of complex relationships present in modern engineering systems and products

  • Develop a high level of analytical capability as modern engineering design demands of it.

  • Develop habits of logical thinking and effective communication



  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   12


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page