Master List of Virtual Tours Virtual Tour Sites for Russell/Taylor, Operations Management, 5e



Download 111.99 Kb.
Page1/3
Date conversion10.07.2018
Size111.99 Kb.
  1   2   3
Master List of Virtual Tours

Virtual Tour Sites for Russell/Taylor, Operations Management, 5e
This list contains 117 tour sites, which are only some of the many virtual company tours available on the Internet. We have organized our list according to several different industries and for each site we provide a brief description of what the company produces (if it’s not obvious), what kind of tour it is (i.e., video or photos, narrated, etc.), how long it is (if it’s a video tour), and any special features of the tour. Some of these tours are used specifically for the virtual tour question and answer modules for each chapter.

Auto/Vehicle/Plane
Boeing ( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)
This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. To get to the videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then click on “Airplanes” from the “Products 1” page. This video begins with a brief narrated introduction with diagrams, photos and text and then moves to a speeded up video of the complete production process for a Boeing 777 with background music (and no narration). The entire video is approximately seven minutes. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.

BMW (http://bmwusfactory.com/build/)

This virtual tour of the BMW plant in Spartanburg, South Carolina is one of the slickest sites on the Internet. Tours are provided for both the X5 SUV and the Z4 Roadster. Each tour includes a series of pages with text and excellent photos that encompass the body shop, paint shop and assembly line. You navigate through the steps in the manufacturing process from a timeline. The site also includes separate links for “efficiency” and “quality control.” Each of these links includes narration and photos that discuss these facets of BMW auto manufacturing. For example, the “efficiency” link discusses how BMW uses flexible manufacturing and 3D CAD programs for design.

Ford ( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)
This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. To get to the videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then click on “Cars” from the “Products 1” page. This video begins with a brief narrated introduction with diagrams, photos and text and then moves to a narrated video of the complete production process for a 1994 Ford Mustang. Although the video is 10 years old it is still an excellent presentation of the basics of auto manufacturing. The entire video covers the production process from the delivery of rolled steel to the final car and is approximately nine minutes. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.
Ford Rouge Plant (http://www.detnews.com/specialreports/2004/rouge/virtualtour.htm)
This is a limited site presented by the Detroit News. It includes a diagram of the Visitors Center at the Ford Rouge Plant and a second diagram of the Dearborn Truck Plant where they make F-150 trucks. You can click on several points on this truck plant diagram for photos and brief descriptions of some of the manufacturing processes. There is no sound, animation or video.
Ferrara Fire Trucks and Emergency Vehicles (http://www.ferrarafire.com/)

This site for Ferrara Fire Apparatus, Inc. provides a 10-minute narrated video tour of its Louisiana fire truck plant. The video does not provide a step-by-step description of the assembly process; rather it focuses on individual fire truck features that are superior to competitors. The video focuses on the company’s modular design process and their trucks’ quality, dependability and ease of service features.

GE Locomotives (https://www.getransportation.com/general/locomotives/virtual_tour/tour/planttour_default.asp)
This tour is of Building 10 at General Electric’s Transportation Systems Erie, Pennsylvania plant where locomotives are assembled. The text and photo tour shows the six stations in the final assembly process for a locomotive.
General Motors (http://www.lsj.com/news/gm/flash/gm_plant.html)
This is a graphic tour of the General Motors Lansing Plant. It shows the basic process flow of manufacturing a car. The tour includes a color overhead drawing of the plant which includes 3 main sections – body shop, paint shop and assembly. When you click on a building/section there is a brief introductory narration of that process and then additional links that provide pop-up boxes with text descriptions of the individual processes in that facility.
General Motors
( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)
This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. To get to the videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then click on “More Cars” from the “Products 2” page. This is an 18-minute video that is not narrated but has factory sound. It includes a series of shorter titled videos that show different auto manufacturing processes at a GM plant as cars proceed along the assembly line. Because of the length of the total video it takes some time to download. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.

Harley-Davidson ( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)

This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. There are four Harley Davidson videos at this site. To get to the first two videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then from the “Products 1” page click on “Motorcycles” or “Motorcycle Engines.” The “Motorcycles” video begins with a brief narrated introduction with photos and text and then moves to a speeded up video of the complete production process for a motorcycle with background music (and no narration). The entire video is approximately six minutes. The video for engines is also a speeded up video showing the complete production of an engine and it is approximately 3 minutes. On the “Products 2” page there are two additional video tours; one for “Motorcycle Side Cars” that is 5 minutes long and another one for “Motorcycle Engines II” that is 3 minutes long. Both of these videos are unnarrated with background music. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.

Honda Ohio (http://www.ohio.honda.com/manufacturing/facilities/index.asp)

This site contains virtual video tours of four Honda plants in Ohio – the Anna engine plant, the East Liberty auto pant, the Marysville auto plant and the Marysville motorcycle plant. For each plant there are 4 or 5 separate videos for different departments; for example, paint, stamp, assembly and quality. At this site there are also two additional short (2 to 3 minute) videos – “Watch How to Make a Car” and “Watch How to make an Engine.”

John Deere ( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)
This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. To get to the videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then click on “Construction Equipment” from the “Products 2” page. This 10-minute narrated video tour shows the manufacture of a John Deere bulldozer tractor from the design stage to the final product. Employees narrate different sections highlighting the manufacturing processes. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.

Morgan Motor Company (http://www.morgan-motor.co.uk/index_frames.html)
The Morgan Motor Company in the United Kingdom manufactures convertible sports cars. From their home page, click on the “Production” link at the top of the page to access the factory tour. Once you start the tour continue to click on the arrow at the bottom of the plant diagram to move through the assembly steps. The brief tour has photos and text.
Nummi (http://www.nummi.com/manu_process.html)

New United Manufacturing, Inc. (Nummi) is a joint auto making venture of GM and Toyota. The company currently manufactures the Toyota Corolla, Toyota Tacoma and Pontiac Vibe. This page at the Nummi web site, called “How We Do It,” contains a primarily text description of 9 functional areas and processing including stamping, plastics, body and weld, paint, assembly, production control, quality control and quality assurance. Each page includes a few photos. There is also a page devoted to the production system which provides a good glossary of terms associated with the Toyota Production System. There is a separate “Cyber Tour” which can be assessed form the “Tours” link at the top of this page and then clicking on ‘Cyber Tour” from the drop down menu. This tour is an overview of the information provided on the “How We Do It” page.

Toyota Manufacturing Kentucky (http://www.toyotageorgetown.com/vtour/vtour.asp)
This is a tour of the Toyota plant in Georgetown, Kentucky where Toyota Camrys, Avalons and Solaras are manufactured. The virtual tour visits six plant areas – powertrain, stamping, bodyweld, paint, plastics and assembly. Each stop on the tour includes a page with text, videos photos and IPIX photo images with 360 degree visuals. This tour provides a very good overall description of the auto assembly process.
Workhorse Custom Chassis (http://www.workhorse.com/tours/virtual.asp)
Workhorse Custom Chassis manufactures chassis for RVs, school buses, commercial vans and motor homes at its Union City, Indiana plant. This virtual plant tour combines animation, photos and text plus sound effects. The tour is conducted over an animated assembly line that describes the 10-step manufacturing process. As an animated chassis moves along the line at each stop a specific step in the production process is described with text and photos.

Boats
Correct Craft (http://skinautique.com/)
Correct Craft manufactures the Nautique line of ski/recreational boats. To access the tour move your cursor to the “Correct Craft” tab at the top of the page and then click on the factory tour link from the drop-down window. This brings up a separate window with the factory tour. The tour includes 26 numbered steps each corresponding to a page. Each page includes a photo with a brief text description. The tour is accompanied by music.
Folbot (http://folbot.com/plant-tour.html)
Folbot is a Charleston, South Carolina that manufactures foldable kayak boats. The tour employs text and photos to describe the manufacturing process for a kayak.

Namura Shipbuilding (http://www.namura.co.jp/eng/factory/yard00-e.htm)

This is a slide presentation of the Namura shipbuilding facility in Imari City, Japan. Namura makes tankers and bulk transport ships and other commercial vessels. The shipyard tour includes 13 color slides of the construction process with brief text descriptions.

Ceramics/Glass/Pottery
Bennington Potters (http://www.benningtonpotters.com/tour-page1.html)
This tour of Bennington Potters in Vermont provides text descriptions of the 5 steps involved in pottery production – clay, forming and shaping, hand finishing and glazing, firing, and back stamping. Each step has a page with text and several photos.
Blue Mountain Pottery (http://bluemountainpottery.com/online/)
This nine-page tour of the Blue Mountain Pottery Company in Ontario, Canada encompasses text and photo descriptions of the 9 step pottery manufacturing process from raw clay to shipping. Each page describes a step in the process. The photos are thumbnails that can be enlarged by clicking on them.
Homer Laughlin (http://members.aol.com/hlfiesta/tour/intro.htm)
This is a tour of the Homer Laughlin plant in Newell, West Virginia where Fiestaware china is produced. The tour includes 63 pages of text and color photos describing the production process for cups, bowls and plates.
Kokomo Opalescent Glass (http://www.kog.com/Tour/Tour1.html)
Kokomo Opalescent Glass makes colored glass like the kind that is used to make stained glass windows. This tour of the Kokomo, Indiana plant includes 12 pages with text and several photos on each page describing the glass production process.

Food Products and Beverages

Cadbury (http://www.cadbury.com.au/magicaltours/virtualtour.php)
The Cadbury factory tour uses text combined with color animations to describe the process for making chocolate candy. The process steps shown in the tour include the ingredients, mixing, refining, conching, tempering, making products, wrapping up and delivery. There are also links for making chocolate bars, chocolate blocks and Easter eggs.
Canadian Springs Water (http://www.canadiansprings.com/tour.cfm)
The Canadian Springs Water Company produces distilled, bottled water for a British Columbia and Alberta market. This plant tour includes 6 pages with text and photos describing the production process. Quality is emphasized. There is no sound or videos.
Cargill Salt (http://www.cargillsalt.com/sfbay/T_main.html)
This tour shows how Cargill harvests salt from San Francisco Bay at its salt works. The photo tour is divided into three sections – salt stacks, solar plant and salt refinery. The photos are accompanied by text descriptions.
Coca-Cola (http://www.vpt.coca-cola.com/vpt_index.html)
This is an animated plant tour that encompasses the 10-step process for making and bottling Coca-Colas from the ingredients delivery stage to warehousing and delivery. The tour contains no voice narration; only music and sound effects and written descriptions. Each step in the production process has a page that also includes a few photos that can be enlarged. It also includes some drag and drop exercises and games aimed at kids. The tour is both informative and fun and the animation and graphics are excellent.
Coca-Cola Bottling ( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)

This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. To get to the videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then click on “Bottling Drinks” from the “Products 1” page. This 5 minute narrated video tour shows the bottling process for Sprite at the Coca-Cola Bottling Company’s Bishopville, South Carolina plant. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.



Coors (http://www.coors.com/movie2/home.html)
This tour is a 30-second unnnarrated video clip (with sound) of the Coors Colorado brewery. It includes shots of bottling and packaging.
Dubble Bubble Gum (http://www.dubblebubble.com/tour.html)
This site contains two Dubble Bubble factory tours for Bubblegum and Gumballs. Each tour combines animations, text and short 10-second videos to describe the manufacturing process. For each stage in the production process there is a brief text description with a video. There is no sound.
Eli’s Cheesecakes (http://www.elicheesecake.com/indexabout.htm)
When you go to this site for Eli’s Cheesecake in Chicago click on the “Tour Eli’s” link and from there you can link to the virtual tour. The brief tour is one page with text and photos describing the process for making cheesecakes.
Fudge House at Fisherman’s Wharf (http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/candy/fudgehouse.html)
This is a short factory tour of how fudge is made at the Fudge House at Fisherman’s Wharf in San Francisco. The tour encompasses 3 pages with text and photos that describe the steps in the fudge making process.
Golden Cheese Company (http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/gccc/homepage.htm)

This site for the Golden Cheese Company of California provides a detailed text and photo tour of its plant for making cheese and milk by-products. The tour encompasses 15 pages that focus on various aspects of cheese production such as milk receiving, block forming, shredding, whey processing, quality control and process controls. There is also a page with graphic color step-by-step schematics of the processing operations for different milk components that also explains how each milk component is used. There is no sound or videos.

Great Divide Brewing Company (http://www.greatdivide.com/)
The Great Divide Brewing Company is a small, independent brewery located near Coors Field in Denver. From their home page you can take the brewery tour by clicking on the “In the Brewhouse” link. The text and photo tour encompasses 8 pages that describe the brewing process. There are also separate links to the brewhouse process flow diagram and the fermentation process diagram. Each diagram includes numbered steps in the process with text descriptions of each step.
Hersheys (http://www.hersheys.com/tour/index.shtml)
Hershey’s provides an excellent factory tour of its chocolate manufacturing process. This site actually contains two versions of the factory tour – one with text and photos (without sound) and the other with videos and narration. Each tour follows a six-step manufacturing process from tropical jungles where cocoa beans are harvested to final product distribution. The video version is narrated by two kids and each of the six manufacturing steps includes a video that is one to two minutes long. The text version includes photos that correspond to the videos.
Hersheys ( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)

This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. To get to the videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then click on “Chocolate” from the “Products 1” page. This video begins with a brief narrated introduction with diagrams, photos and text and then moves to a narrated video of the complete production process for chocolate. The video is approximately 5 minutes. This video is produced by the Chocolate Manufacturers Association but it is very similar to the Hershey’s tour listed previously, although it is more detailed. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.

Jack Daniels (http://www.jackdaniels.com/distillerytour.asp)
This is an excellent website with a sophisticated virtual tour of the whiskey distillery process at Jack Daniel’s Distillery in Lynchburg, Tennessee. The distillery tour is narrated by a tour guide and includes 9 pages describing the distilling process from the “rickyard” to the “barrel house.” Each page combines animation, photos, voice narration and text to describe a process. Most pages also include a short one or two minute video.
Jelly Belly (http://jellybelly.com/Cultures/en-US/Fun/Tours/)
This site includes a brief text and photo “virtual” tour of the Jelly Belly plant in northern California. The tour describes the 8-step production process for Jelly Belly candy. Each step has a short text description and photo.
Jelly Belly ( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)
This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. To get to the videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then click on “Jelly Beans” from the “Products 1” page. This video begins with a brief narrated introduction with diagrams, photos and text and then moves to a narrated video of the complete production process for a Jelly Belly jelly bean. The video is approximately 6 minutes. This is a much more detailed tour than the previous Jell Belly tour. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.

Kendon Candies Lollipops (http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/candy/kendon.html)

Kendon Candies located in San Jose, California is the world’s third largest producer of lollipops. This site contains two factory tours. One is a 1:45 minute video of the lollipop production process narrated by the company’s owner and head cook, Tom Kennedy. The other tour contains much of the same information as the video, but it is static combining text and photos.
Kona Coffee (http://www.lioncoffee.com/tourkona.html)
This tour of Hawaii Coffee Company’s Kona coffee processing mill on the Big Island of Hawaii includes 16 slide photos with text descriptions. The tour covers the complete production process from coffee beans to the final product.
Krispy Kreme Doughnuts (http://money.howstuffworks.com/krispy-kreme.htm)
This a very good, detailed factory tour of how doughnuts are made at Krispy Kreme from the “How Stuff Works” Internet web site. The tour encompasses 6 pages with a lot of text, excellent photos and 4 videos for different processes including the proof box, frying and flipping, glazing and filling.
Manischewitz Wines (http://www.manischewitzwine.com/tour/tour.htm)
This tour of the Manischewitz Winery in Naples, New York includes 10 slides with text descriptions of the steps in the wine-making process.
Marshmellow Peeps (http://www.marshmallowpeeps.com/about/factory_tour.html)
Marshmellow Peeps are the brightly colored, marshmellow animals that you see displayed prominently in stores around Easter-time. This brief animated plant tour shows the six-step manufacturing process from mixing and whipping the ingredients to packaging. Each step in the process is on a separate page with a single photo and a written description. There is no sound or videos.

Marshmellow Peeps ( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)

This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. To get to the videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then click on “Candy Packaging” from the “Products 1” page. This is brief 2-minute narrated video showing how two candy products, “Hot Tamales” and “Marshmellow Peeps” are packaged. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.

McCadam Cheese (http://www.mccadam.com/Structure4.html)
This site contains a one-page text and photo tour of the McCadam Cheese plant in Chateaugay, New York. The brief factory tour encompasses the six-step cheese making process.
Milk (http://www.moomilk.com/tours/tour1-1.htm)
This virtual tour is called “The Story of Milk,” and it describes the process of producing milk from feed to its delivery to a company like Nestles for chocolate production. The tour encompasses 8 pages that combine text with animations and photos. It is somewhat juvenile but still interesting.
Miller Brewing (http://www.millerbrewing.com/takeTour/takeTour.asp)
This is a brief photo tour of the Miller Brewery in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The tour includes 6 steps in the brewing process; each step ahs a page with a color photo and text description. The steps are ingredients, brewing, fermentation, aging, packaging and cold filtering.
Monitor Sugar (http://www.monitorsugar.com/htmtext/btintro.htm)

This is a very detailed and well-done animated tour of the sugar production process. It includes a point-and-click flowchart with 16 pages showing the steps of sugar making from beet receiving to packing and shipping. Each page has a detailed color animation of the specific step in the manufacturing process accompanied by an equally detailed written description of the step. Photos are also included on some pages and there is a separate photo tour. There are also interesting links to the “history of sugar” and the “chemistry of sugar making.”

Moonpie (http://moonpie.com/manuf.asp)
This short text and photo tour describes the 9-step process for making Moonpie marshmallow and chocolate sandwiches at the company’s Chattanooga, Tennessee plant.
Norbest Turkeys (http://www.norbest.com/a_turkey_tour.cfm)
Norbest is a cooperative of turkey producers and processors headquartered in Midvale, Utah. The tour includes 11 pages with text and photos describing the turkey production process from the hatchery to final packaging.

Redhook Brewery (http://www.redhook.com/brew_virtual_tour.html)
The Redhook Brewing Company has breweries in Woodinville, Washington and Portsmouth, New Hampshire. The factory tour at this site includes primarily text with color graphics for the three primary brewing facilities and processes – the brew house, cellar and packaging. The brew house segment describes six steps from malted barley to the heat exchanger. Each step includes a brief text description and color drawing with a link to a more detailed text description. The cellar segment encompasses two steps for fermentation and filtration and it’s constructed similarly with an overview of each step and links to a more detailed description. The final segment on packaging encompasses three steps – bottling, kegging and shipping. Separate from the tour at this site are a series of ten interactive photo images of the manufacturing facilities and processes that can be rotated 360 degrees.
Royal Cake Company (http://www.royalcake.com/planttou.htm)

The Royal Cake Company produces packaged cookies at its plant in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The plant tour is on a single page that includes text descriptions (and 7 photos) of the steps in the production of oatmeal cookies.



  1   2   3


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page