Master List of Virtual Tours Virtual Tour Sites for Russell/Taylor, Operations Management, 5e



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Furniture
Statton Furniture (http://www.statton.com/tourpics.htm)
Statton is a Maryland company that makes fine solid cherry furniture. The plant tour is made up exclusively of photos with written descriptions that describe the four main furniture-making processes – rough mill, machining, assembly and finishing. There are approximately 35 photos showing the manufacturing process.
Stickley Furniture (http://www.stickley.com/)
Stickley Furniture manufactures fine wood furniture in its New York factory near Syracuse. This home page for Stickley contains links to two tours – a text and photo factory tour, and an 11-minute narrated video tour. The text and photo factory tour includes 5 pages that describe the furniture making process while the narrated video tour provides a detailed look at Stickley products, its employees and the furniture making process. Quality is particularly emphasized.


Light Manufacturing
Advanced Micro Devices ( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)

This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. To get to the videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then click on “Semiconductors” from the “Products 2” page. This 2-minute narrated video shows how semiconductors are produced in an environmentally-controlled facility at AMD. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.

Arlon Vinyl Films (http://www.arlon.com/graphics/)
Arlon Vinyl films located in Santa Ana, California manufactures vinyl films that are used in the graphics industry to make signs like the ones you see outside fast food restaurants like KFC. The plant tour (which takes a short while to download) includes a narrated five-minute video with text and photos of steps in the manufacturing process. Arlon has ISO 9001 certification.
Bic (http://www.bicworldusa.com/inter_us/site_map.asp)
This link takes you to the Bic site map where you can click on “How it is made” animated tours of three Bic products – pens, lighters and shavers. A tour shows a picture of the product, and when you place the cursor on the product it breaks apart (using animation) into its component parts. As you roll the cursor over the various parts a written description appears that describes the production process for that specific part. The graphics and animation are excellent. There is no sound, video or narration.
Buck Knives (http://www.buckknives.com/plant_tour.php)
Buck Knives, located in El Cajon, California, manufactures pocket knives. The factory tour at this site encompasses 18 pages that describe the process of manufacturing knives in detail using text and photos. The tour shows photos of a number of different types of machines found in job shops.

Cameron Hot Air Balloons (http://www.bized.ac.uk/virtual/cb/)

This is a comprehensive tour of the Cameron Hot Air Balloon Company in Bristol, United Kingdom. The factory tour takes you through production, design, marketing and sales, accounts, and purchasing. Each of these stops includes a page with text and photos describing the function or process. They include links to resource pages such as a more in-depth explanation of the process. There is also a “virtual tour” that is an interactive imaging photo tour of the Cameron plant. The site also includes a feature called “A Day in the Life” which describes the activities of the accounts manager, marketing manager and production manager. Another nice feature at this site is a link to “Student Questions and Answers” that ask questions about operations management at Cameron. Overall this is a great site.

Corbin-Pacific (http://www.corbin.com/factorytour/)
Corbin makes motorcycle accessories, such as motorcycle saddles, at its plant in Hollister, California. The plant tour is 13 pages with text and photos of various product production processes, primarily saddles.
Empire Snowboards (http://www.empiresnowboards.com/Factory.html)
This tour includes a series of color slides with brief text descriptions showing the construction of snowboards at Empire’s Venice, California plant. The manufacturing process is described from the design stage to final product. Once you start the tour it moves itself at its own pace; do not click on the link to advance the tour yourself or it will start over.
Friesens Book Division (http://www.friesens.com/Bookplant/PlantTour/BPTour.asp)
Friesens is located in Manitoba, Canada and produces all kinds of books (coffee table, art, trade, cook, educational, etc.) for the North American market. The plant tour includes 6 pages, each with multiple photos of the book manufacturing process plus detailed text descriptions. Also included are separate links to more detailed aspects of the production process including, customer service, paper stock, learning about printing and various pieces of equipment. Friesens has ISO 9002 certification.
Honeywell (http://content.honeywell.com/sensing/solutions/markets/aobmrkt/vtour.stm)

This tour is of Honeywell’s automotive sensing and controls facility which makes speed and position sensors for automobile engine management, wheel speed and transmission control. The tour includes color slides with text descriptions of different stages and processes in the overall manufacturing process. However, the tour is somewhat generic in that it does not relate to the manufacture of a single product. It describes individual processes like quality control, JIT, design, molding, etc.


Malloy Lithographing (http://www.malloy.com/siteindx.htm)
Malloy is a book manufacturing company located in Ann Arbor, Michigan. It manufactures books from electronic files, camera-ready copy and film that it transfers onto lithographic plates for printing. The text and photo tour describes a six-step production process encompassing book engineering, digital imaging, prepress, press, binding and shipping. There is an overview of the process. Links are also provided for more detailed descriptions of various functions and equipment. There is no sound or videos.
Ping Golf Equipment (http://www.pinggolf.com/innovation_factory_tour.html)
This plant tour encompasses the four phases for manufacturing Ping golf clubs – design and engineering, molding and investment casting, heat treating and finishing, and component matching and personalization. Each phase has a page with a verbal description and a 15 second video. There is no sound or narration. There is also some interesting information and a separate page about Ping’s ISO 9001 certification.
Ping Golf Equipment ( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)

This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. To get to the videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then click on “Golf Clubs” from the “Products 2” page. This video begins with a brief narrated introduction with diagrams, photos and text and it then moves to a narrated video of part of the production process for golf clubs called investment casting at Ping. The video is approximately 3 minutes. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.

Thompson-Shore Books (http://www.tshore.com/DesktopDefault.aspx?tabid=27)
Thomson-Shore is a Michigan book manufacturer. This factory tour encompasses 4 pages with detailed text and photos describing the manufacturing process and the company’s commitment to customer service and quality. There is no sound or videos.
Tom’s of Maine (http://www.tomsofmaine.com/about/tour_factory.asp)
Tom’s of Maine makes toothpaste using natural ingredients. This short, one-page factory tour uses text and photos to describe the steps of the production process.
Heavy Manufacturing
Abba Rubber International (http://www.abbarubber.com/tour.html)
Abba fabricates rubber rolls, recover rolls and manufactures precision molded parts at its plant in southern California. The tour encompasses 7 pages with text and 18 photos that describe the different processes at Abba. There are some good photos of CNC machinery.
Air-X-Changers (http://www.airx.com/hightech.htm)
Air-X-Change manufactures air-cooled heat exchangers at its plant in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Heat exchangers are the large fans you see on the tops of building and plants. The brief factory tour is on one page and includes text and 9 photos of the manufacturing process.
Ball (http://www.ball.com/bhome/can_mf/can_life.html)
Colorado-based Ball Corporation produces different containers including jars and aluminum cans. The tour is a combination of brief unnarrated videos, text and photos. The tour is broken down into 3 sections – can sheet production, manufacturing which includes 11 steps, and packaging and filling. Each section includes text and photos plus some brief (20-second) videos.

Boeing Aircraft (http://www.boeing.com/companyoffices/aboutus/tours/tourphoto.html)

This tour includes 6 photos of the Boeing plant in Everett, Washington where Boeing 747s are manufactured. There is no text with the photos.
C&R Manufacturing (http://forecast.umkc.edu/vtours/compback.htm)
C&R is a small, highly automated manufacturing company (i.e., job shop) near Kansas City. The tour is broken down into 12 specific topic or functional areas, for example, “What is a Job Shop?,” “Marketing,” “Human Resources,” and “ISO 9000 and Quality.” Each topic (page) includes a detailed written description with examples of how this topic or function relates to C&R. Each topic page includes several photos. There are no videos, sound or animations.
Elk Corporation (http://www.elkcorp.com/new_virtual_tours.cfm)
Elk Manufacturing produces laminated fiberglass roofing shingles at four U.S. plants in Texas, California, Alabama and Pennsylvania. This site includes 4 to 7 minute video plant tours of all four plants. Each plant video shows the manufacturing process for laminated shingles which is straightforward and virtually the same for each plant, although the Alabama facility is smaller. The tour for the PA plant emphasizes their customer service while the video for CA emphasizes their site selection, distribution and logistics as well as their quality control focus. Each tour is very good and informative.
Flat Glass ( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)

This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. To get to the videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then click on “Glass” from the “Products 2” page. This video begins with a narrated introduction with diagrams, photos and text and it then moves to a narrated video of the complete production process for flat glass that is primarily used in buildings and cars. The video is produced by PPG and GMIC and is approximately 8 minutes. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.

Glass Bottles ( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)
This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. To get to the videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then click on “Glass Bottles” from the “Products 1” page. This video begins with a 4-minute narrated introduction with diagrams, photos and text showing how a glass bottle is produced. It then moves to a narrated video of the complete production process for a glass bottle provided by Saint-Gobain Containers, Inc. The video is approximately 13 minutes. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.
Jotul Stoves (http://jotulflame.com/tour/starttour.html)
Jotul is Norwegian manufacturer of wood burning and gas burning stoves for the home. It manufactures all of its stoves at its plant in Frederikstad, Norway and then ships them to is facility in Portland, Maine for final assembly for the U.S. market. The site contains two tours, a slide show with photos and text and a six-minute video tour with text and music but no voice narration. Both tours describe the manufacturing process from the material stage to the warehouse.
LA Aluminum (http://www.laaluminum.com/Plant_Tour/plant_tour.htm)
LA Aluminum, founded in Los Angeles, is now located in Hayden Lake, Idaho. It manufactures mold aluminum castings that are used by its customers to make other products. The tour includes two pages of text with photos of the production of aluminum castings process.

Manufacturing Processes ( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)

This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. To get to the videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then click on the “Processes” page. This page includes 23 short narrated videos (mostly one to two minutes) of various manufacturing processes such as die casting, blow molding, bending, forging, milling, turning, casting and assembly. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.
Meier Tool and Engineering (http://meiertool.com/PlantTour.htm)
Meier is a custom metal stamping company (i.e., tool and die shop) located in Anoka, Minnesota. The tour includes 24 pages with brief text and color photos of various metal stamping operations. Emphasis is on process control and inspection with some good photos of CNC equipment and dies.
Multifilm Packaging (http://www.multifilm.com/tour.htm)
Multifilm Packaging located in Elgin, Illinois manufactures wrapping materials for the food industry, primarily confectioneries. The tour is only one page with 8 photos and text describing several different steps in the production process.
Paper Making (http://www.wipapercouncil.org/process.htm)

This is a generic tour of the paper making process produced by the Wisconsin Paper Council. The tour encompasses the five-step paper making process including forestry, debarking, pulp preparation, paper formation, and finishing. Each step is described on a separate page with text and nice color drawings.

Plastic Bottles ( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)
This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. To get to the videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then click on “Plastic” from the “Products 1” page. This tour begins with a brief narrated introduction and then moves to a narrated video of the production process for a plastic bottle provided by the Society of Plastic Engineers. The video is approximately 3 minutes. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.

Plastic Caps ( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)
This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. To get to the videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then click on “Plastic Caps” from the “Products 1” page. This tour begins with a narrated introduction with diagrams, photos and text then moves to a video showing how a plastic bottle is produced at Portola Packaging Company in South Carolina. The video is approximately 7 minutes. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.
Portland Cement (http://www.cement.org/basics/images/flashtour.html)

This tour at the Portland Cement Association web site describes a six-step process for making cement – 1. quarry; 2. proportioning, blending and grinding; 3. preheater tower; 4. kiln; 5. clinker cooler and finish grinding; and 6. bagging and shipping. Clicking on a step accesses a window about that part of the process, which includes animations, sound effects and a text description. The tour is self-directed.

Royal Homes (http://www.royalhomes.com/about/profile/tour.html)
Royal Homes of Ontario, Canada builds modular homes at its plant that it transports and assembles at home sites. The tour includes a series of 16 black and white photos with text descriptions showing the different stages of constructing a home in modules.
RMC Lonestar Concrete (http://www.michaelholigan.com/departments/tvshow/seg_index.asp?ts_id=5305)
This site includes a very well-done and detailed 7-minute narrated video showing the production of Portland grade cement at the RMC Lonestar plant in California. The video shows the complete manufacturing process for turning limestone into cement.
Steel ( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)
This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. To get to the videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then click on “Steel” from the “Products 2” page. This video begins with a narrated introduction with diagrams, photos and text and it then moves to a narrated video of the complete steel production process. The video is produced by Steelnet and is approximately 13 minutes. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.
Triangle Brick (http://www.trianglebrick.com/)

The Triangle Brick Company is located in Durham, North Carolina. This tour can be accessed from the Triangle Brick home page by clicking on the “Virtual Plant Tour” link on the left side of the page. The tour is an excellent 5 minute, narrated color video that includes all the stages of the manufacturing process from mining shale and clay to delivery of the final product at home sites.

Tupperware ( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)
This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. To get to the videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then click on “Plastic Containers” from the “Products 1” page. This is a 5-minute video tour of the injection molding production process for making Tupperware plastic containers at Tupperware’s Hemingway, South Carolina plant. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.
U.S. Mint (http://www.usmint.gov/kids/index.cfm?fileContents=coinnews/preshow.cfm)
This is basically a kid’s site but the tour does briefly outline the six-step process for making coins at the U.S. Mint. The tour includes six pages with text and animated cartoons of the production steps.

USS Ronald Reagan (http://www.nn.northropgrumman.com/Reagan/frmconstruction.htm)

The USS Ronald Reagan is a Nimitz-class nuclear powered aircraft carrier that was commissioned in July, 2003. This site, called “About the Ship,” describes the construction of the USS Ronald Reagan by Northrop Grumman at its Newport News, Virginia shipbuilding facility. It includes links to pages about the ship’s capability, size and capacity. The link to “construction” includes a text and photo slide show tour of the Reagan ship-building process at various points in time. There is also a link to the Newport News Shipbuilding facility. The “photo gallery” link at the top of this page includes the construction tour on a single page with text and photos.

Wheelabrator Abrasives (http://www.wheelabr.com/Tour/process.htm)
This detailed tour of the Wheelabrator Abrasives Beford, Virginia plant includes photos and text of each step in the manufacturing process. The plant was the first in the U.S. to acquire ISO 9002 certification.

Musical Instruments
Gibson Custom Guitars (http://www.gibson.com/magazines/amplifier/1999/3/main-ev1.html)
This is a brief tour of the Gibson Custom Guitar Division in Nashville, Tennessee where repairs, custom orders and the Gibson Historic Collection are produced. The tour includes 3 pages with text and photos describing how these special guitars are made.
Powell Flutes (http://www.powellflutes.com/home/index.html)
At this site for Verne P. Powell Flutes located in Maynard, Massachusetts, click on “Workshop” at the bottom of the page and then from the pop-up menu click on the “Factory Tour” link. The visually attractive 6-minute video factory tour appears in a separate window and includes animation, background flute music, and video with interactive photos narrated by Powell employees. The tour encompasses 7 areas in the production of flutes including parts, body making, steels, stringing keys, finishing, testing and headjoints.
Rickenbacker Guitars (http://www.rickenbacker.com/us/factory.htm)

Rickenbacker makes electric guitars primarily by hand at its plant in Santa Ana, California. The tour encompasses four departments – wood shop, finishing, assembly and inspection, and acoustic guitars - each with a separate page with text and photos Rickenbaker guitars have been used by many famous rock musicians including the Beatles. There is also an interesting link to the history of electric guitars.

Steinway Pianos (http://www.steinway.com/factory/tour.shtml)
The factory tour for Steinway & Sons in Manhattan includes text and photos. The process for making pianos is described in detail and the 14 thumbnail photos can be enlarged in a separate window by clicking on them.
Tacoma Guitars 1. (http://www.tacomaguitars.com/tour.htm and 2. http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Features/Tacoma/tacoma01.html)
There are two tours for Tacoma guitars. The first one is a Tacoma company tour that encompasses 34 photos of various steps in the manufacture of wooden acoustic guitars. The photos are presented in no particular order and they are accompanied by very brief (one-line) descriptions. The second Tacoma tour is by an independent group and it is much more detailed and well-done. It encompasses 3 pages with about 40 color photos on each page. Each photo is a thumbnail with a brief description. You can enlarge the photos by clicking on the thumbnails. This tour also includes four brief (about 15 seconds) videos of specific manufacturing steps, for example the use of CNC machines to cut guitar necks. (However, these videos take 4 to 5 minutes to download).

Yamaha Musical Instruments (http://www.yamaha.co.jp/edu/english/index.html)
This site includes tours of the manufacturing processes for five musical instruments – trumpet, horn, saxophone, clarinet and flute. Each instrument has a separate tour. The tours describe the steps in the manufacturing process in detail from the design stage to final assembly and finishing, plus the mouthpieces. Each stage in the process has a separate page with written descriptions, photos, drawings and animations. Each tour is followed by a “question and answer” page abut the process. There is no sound or narration.




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