Master List of Virtual Tours Virtual Tour Sites for Russell/Taylor, Operations Management, 5e



Download 111.99 Kb.
Page3/3
Date conversion10.07.2018
Size111.99 Kb.
1   2   3

Product Innovation/R&D
Bell Labs (http://www.bell-labs.com/)
This site is the home page for Bell Labs. The link on this page to “Video Highlights” provides several videos about significant Bell Labs achievements. A six-minute video titled, “Bell Labs Innovations – Music Video,” provides a historic overview of Bell Labs achievements over time with a lot of interesting photos and videos set to music.
3M (http://www.3m.com/US/index.jhtml)
This site is the U.S. home page for 3M. Click on the link, “A Century of Innovation.” At the bottom of this page is a link to a 5-minute video with narration titled, “Century of Innovation, Historical Snapshot,” which provides an interesting and informative overview of 3M products and their development. The video includes recreated scenes with actors about the early days of 3M.

Services
Centropolis FX (http://entertainment.howstuffworks.com/cfx1.htm)

Centropolis FX (CFX) creates computer-generated (digital) visual effects for Hollywood movies. This tour (at the “How Stuff Works” Internet Site) provides a detailed description of how CFX creates visual effects. Included are written descriptions, photos and video clips that show examples of its tools and techniques primarily from the movie “The Patriot” with Mel Gibson. For example, it has several “before-and-after” videos and a number of photos showing scenes as they were shot and then how they looked in the movie after the visual effects had been added. Sections (pages) include an overview of the visual effects process and the technology used. One interesting point is that it uses Microsoft Project to build its extensive production schedule.


Los Angeles Times (http://www.latimes.com/extras/tie/virtualtour/)
This tour, called “A Day in the Life of a Newspaper,” describes the production process for the Los Angeles Times. The tour has 7 steps including the story, digitizing, editing, composing, printing, distribution and delivery. Each step has multiple pages with text descriptions and photos. Some of the pages also have links to 360 degree photo images of the manufacturing process. This is a well-done tour without sound and videos.
New York Stock Exchange (http://www.nyse.com)
This site is the home page for the NYSE. On the left side of the page click on “About the NYSE” and from the drop-down menu click on “Education.” This will link you to a virtual tour of the trading floor. The tour uses a combination of text, animation and interactive panoramic photos. From an animated map of the trading floor you can click on different areas, which results in a interactive view of the area with a text description of what takes place in that area.
Pal’s Sudden Service (http://www.palsweb.com/html/2001timeline.html)

Pal’s Sudden Service is a 2001 Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award winner in the small business category. It is a privately owned, quick-service restaurant chain with 17 locations within 60 miles of Kingsport, Tennessee. It was the first restaurant to win the Baldrige Award. This site is not an actual tour of one of Pal’s restaurants but an interesting “timeline” that details the restaurant’s history from its start in 1951 to the present. The timeline includes photos and text descriptions of the openings of all Pal franchises and product introductions.


Port of Seattle (http://www.ody.org/explore/container_shipping_01.htm)
This site is a text and photo tour of the Port of Seattle. There are a series of 9 photos and accompanying (brief) text descriptions dealing with loading container ships. Also included are shipping statistics for the port.
SRP Power (http://www.srpnet.com/community/kids/tour/)
SRP (Salt River Project) Power located in Arizona is the nation’s third largest public utility providing electricity and water. The tour of an SRP power plant includes voice narration, animation, sound effects, photos and text descriptions. The tour is divided into 3 sections – fuel, water and electricity. When you start one of the section tours a pop-up window shows a series of photos. The window and the photos have loudspeaker icons and by clicking on them you receive voice narration. When you click on an individual photo it enlarges and there is also a loudspeaker icon that provides a more detailed voice description of that process or facility. Pay close attention to the instructions on the toolbar at the bottom of the pop-up window to navigate through the tour.
Textiles
Burlington (wool) ( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)

This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. To get to the videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then click on “Wool” from the “Products 1” page. This video begins with a 4-minute narrated introduction with diagrams, photos and text showing how a wool fabric is produced. It then moves to a narrated video of the complete production process for wool fabric at Burlington. The video is approximately 10 minutes. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.

Burlington (denim) ( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)
This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. To get to the videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then click on “Denim” from the “Products 1” page. This video begins with a narrated introduction with diagrams, photos and text showing how cotton denim fabric is produced. It then moves to a narrated video of the complete production process for denim fabric at Burlington. The video is approximately 8 minutes. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.
Ferguson Irish Linens (http://www.fergusonsirishlinen.com/factorytour/index.asp#)
Thomas Ferguson Irish Linens is located in Banbridge in Northern Ireland. When you open this site it is on the “Factory Tour” page; the link to the virtual tour is at the bottom of the page. Clicking on the virtual tour link opens a window that includes 19 pages with short text and photos describing the linen making process.
Universal T-Shirt Factory (http://www.simon.ca/tour.htm)
Universal is a Quebec company that custom prints t-shirts; it doesn’t actually make the t-shirts, it prints blank shirts. The factory tour is a brief, one-page text description of the steps involved in designing and printing t-shirts. There are 13 black and white and color photos.

Toys

Crayola Crayons (http://www.crayola.com/factory/preview/factory_floor/crayon_mfg.htm)

This is a very short, one-page tour describing the 5-step process for making Crayola Crayons. Each step from wax and pigment production to packaging has a brief text description and photo.
Crayola Crayons ( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)
This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. To get to the videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then click on “Crayons” from the “Products 2” page. This video begins with a brief narrated introduction with diagrams, photos and text and it then moves to a narrated video of the complete production process for crayons at at Crayola. The video is approximately 3 minutes. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.
Dolls ( http://manufacturing.stanford.edu/)

This video is from the “How Everyday Things are Made” Internet website developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (AIM) at Stanford University, which includes a number of narrated video tours for different products and companies plus questions and exercises. To get to the videos click on the “How Everyday Things Are Made” link which activates a pop-up window, then click on “Playgrounds and Dolls” from the “Products 2” page. This video begins with a brief narrated introduction with diagrams, photos and text and it then moves to a narrated video of the rotational molding process used to make plastic toys like dolls and playgrounds. The video is produced by the Association of Rotational Molders and is approximately 6 minutes. This site was basically designed for high-speed Internet connection; if you don’t have a DSL or cable connection the videos take a long time to download.

Lego (http://www.lego.com/plugin/required.asp?callFrom=&pluginType=0&returnURL=/eng/info/howLEGOismade.asp)
This is one of the neatest, hi-tech tour sites on the Internet. The factory tour encompasses the 5-stage process for producing Legos – granules, molding, transport, decorating and assembly, and packaging. Each stage has a separate page that incorporates animation, animated text, sound effects and videos. The page opens with an animation of the stage process with numbered icons that link to short videos of steps in the process.
Roundhouse Engines (http://www.roundhouse-eng.com/factory.htm)
The Roundhouse Engine Company makes toy locomotives at its factory in Doncaster, England. The tour includes color photos with brief text descriptions of the manufacturing process. The tour is a little tedious to navigate; after looking at one slide you must use your back key to return to the home page and then click on the next slide to proceed through the tour.
Xootr Scooters ( http://www.xootr.com/xootr/tour/nfactorytour.htm)

Xootr LLC in Scranton, Pennsylvania makes individual push scooters. This tour begins with a process flow diagram that includes product design and order processing as well as the manufacturing and assembly process. To navigate the tour you must click on an individual process which includes a color photo and text description, and then return to the process flow diagram to go to the next stop on the tour.


1   2   3


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page