Master retouching tips document



Download 431.47 Kb.
Page3/9
Date conversion29.03.2017
Size431.47 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9


Frame Edge Effects

Filed Negative carrier frame
Negative frames
http://forums.dpreview.com/... .../read.asp?forum=1006&message=5990923
BillM’s tut on negative frames
http://forums.dpreview.com/... .../read.asp?forum=1006&message=6061232
Grayscale Masks

How To Use Grayscale Masks For Edge Effects in Photoshop 5 and Up

You can use grayscale masks in conjunction with Photoshop's layer mask feature to create interesting edge effects. This site and many others offer free grayscale masks you can download for this purpose.



Difficulty: Easy
Time Required: 5 minutes

Here's How:

Open a photo and the mask you want to apply to it.

If necessary, rotate the mask so it is the same orientation as the photo. (Image > Rotate Canvas)

Active the mask image, go to Image > Image Size. While the Image Size dialog is on-screen, go to the Window menu and choose the file name of the photo you'll be applying the mask to.

Click OK and the mask will take on the same dimensions as the photo.

With the mask active, Select All (Ctrl-A/Command-A) and Copy (Ctrl-C/Command-C).

Activate the photo and convert the background to a layer by double clicking the background in the layers palette.

Switch to QuickMask Mode by pressing the keyboard shortcut Q.

Paste the mask.

Exit Quick Mask Mode by pressing Q again.

Click the layer mask icon on the layers palette.


Tips:

Experiment with layer styles or layer effects on the masked layer for more interesting effects.


Photoshop gradient blur (background)


Create a duplicate layer and apply the blur to the duplicate layer. Then

create a layer mask (reveal all) and draw a black to white gradient in the layer mask. You are actually erasing half the pic gradualy.

Make sure that the gradiant Opacity is set to 100%.

Hope that helps

-Alan

Cassandra USA 6900z wrote:


> I want to use a gradient blur on the background of this image but
> can't remember how to do it. Can someone please post the steps for
> me?
>
> Cassandra
>
*************************************************************************
*************************************************************************

Photoshop greyscale conversion
Today's Photoshop Tip: Wanna control your grayscale conversion?

The ultimate control over a grayscale conversion may very well be the


Channel Mixer. Open the dialog box using the menu command
Image>Adjust-ments>Channel Mixer. (In Photoshop 6, it's Image>Adjust>Channel Mixer.)
Check the Monochrome box and adjust the sliders to get the best tonal range.

Afterward, use the menu command Image>Mode>Grayscale to create a true grayscale


image. When adjusting the sliders, try to keep the total of their values to
about 100. If you change the Constant slider, add or subtract three times the

slider's value from that total.


*************************************************************************
*************************************************************************

Photoshop impressionist painting


I learned something new today and am excited enough about it to want to share. I really liked the way it looked with impressionist.

convert image to CMYK


duplicate black channel (turn off new channel and leave regular color)
convert back to RGB
load selection and choose black copy as the selection
run impressionist (or any other distorting filter)
deselect--you've got the impressionist feel with detail.

Note: delete the duplicate black channel before saving.


*************************************************************************
Photoshop inner shadow around edge frame
> Thought I'd pass this on, though it may be common knowledge amongst
> > photoshopers here. I used to bust my butt trying to get an inner
> > shadow on all for inside edges of image. Here's how to do it
> > easily in PS. Duplicate layer>layer styles>inner shadow. Set the
> > Distance to Zero, then set choke and size to suit your taste. On a
> > 240ppi image, something like Choke 40%. Size 50px. Here's our
> > baby, Linnie, coming home for Christmas...Dave
*************************************************************************

Lisa Neal’s sketch technique

It’s been a long, long time since I've posted anything here. I thought I would post this photo to show what I've been up to. Child portraiture has taken over my time. I've learned so much here -- just want to let everyone know how much I've appreciated the help along the way.

My clients love this technique I learned from a fellow photog in another forum (Alycia):

Convert the image to b/w using DigiDaan's b/w conversion channels.

Adjust curves to brighten the photo.
Adjust the brightness and contrast just a bit.
Make a snapshot of the image.
Apply unsharpen mask at 500 and make a snapshot of that too.

Use the sharpened version as the histroy brush snapshot then go back to the unsharpened version and brush in 50-75% opacity into the eyes and lips to bring them out.

Use the dodge tool set at about 300 size and 100% opacity to create a vignette all around the top and bottom.

Lower the opacity to about 50% and do a light over the hair, especially if it is dark.

Adjust the brightness or curves if still not light enough.
Filter -> Texture -> softgrain 15-20 at 50% contrast.

~Lisa~


D60, 28-70/2.8L, 135/2L, 85/1.8, 50/1.4, 420EX, Alien Bee B400, Alien Bee B800, Photoflex Large LiteDome softbox, shoot through umbrella, Sekonic L358, BreezeBrowser, PS 7
Make Frames:
Make Frames

 



Make your own action:
1-Select all
2-Select, Modify, Border (select 1 pixel for web pictures)
3-Edit, Fill, White
4-Image, Canvas Size (Change to Pixels, add 50 pixels to each dimension)

5-Select "Canvas Extension Color" at the bottom. Choose and click OK.

Or. In PS go to Actions. Load Actions. Select Frames. Click Load. Now you have a mess of free frame actions.

Now how hard is that. You see Fred charges a lot of money for things that are already in PS or Elements - and FREE. Every version of PS has these actions going way back to version 4 - I believe. if you can't find them do a search. They might still be on your CD (but I doubt it).

Steve Bingham

http://www.dustylens.com


Photoshop insta sketch paint


Another sketch process using Photoshop.

The method is quite simple.

After you finish editing your file, Flatten the layers or use Merge Visible.

Copy the layer. Run the Graphic Pen filter on it.

Invert the the result. Use Cmd/Ctrl-i.
Copy the Background or Merge Visible layer and place it above the layer with the Graphic Pen filter.

Reduce the opacity of the layer to let some color show through the graphic pen strokes. In this case, I used an opacity of 65%.



_______________________________________________

Another sketch process using Photoshop.

1. Desaturate

2. Duplicate layer

3. Invert duplicate layer

4. Set blend mode to Color Dodge

5. With duplicate layer active, apply gaussian blur to taste

6. Use history brush setting of approx. 20 to apply some color

No need for an action as only steps 1 - 3 would be in the action.

____________________________________________________________


The purpose of this action is to enable you to produce a Pencil Sketch and/or a Watercolor rendition from a photograph.

This action is intended to be run on Photoshop 7 or above. A full toned, slightly dark, colorful and sharp image produces the best results.... but that's just my taste. Portraits and other figure images look best for pencil sketches if the subject is in front of a white/light background. Images that have a defined "point of interest" without complicated lines or distractions also work best. Making a copy of the original and cloning out/erasing distractions on the copy before running the action on it is suggested.

Any size original can be used, but for portraits, figure and still life, a small size original (800px X 600px - 1600px X 1200px) can/maybe/possibly work best... the action will resize (Optionally) a couple of times during the process and you will end up with about a 6 mp image for printing.....try it.
It does require some practice and time to master. I generally spend around two hours all up to create the final image. You also need a fast computer with lots of ram otherwise it will be a very slow process. My 2.4 ghz computer with 1gb of ram takes about 2 mins or so to run the action.
When the action finishes, it is set for the ‘reveal pencil’ layer. This gives a light outline of the image. If it is too light, you can go into levels on that layer (not the mask) and move the left slider to the right to make it darker, but the intention here is to give a “sketched” look and if the outline is too dark, it will overwhelm the sketch, so try to keep the outline only as dark as is needed for a guide to your own sketching strokes. You use a BLACK brush on the mask to allow the underlying layers to show through. A WHITE brush will undo. You can also erase lines etc. from this layer and the pencil base layer with the eraser.
It is suggested that you work on the image at “actual pixels” or zoom if needed. On the ‘reveal pencil’ layer with the foreground color set as black, (background - white), you can begin to sketch. Use the brush tool rather than the pencil tool - recommended brush sizes for sketch - #9 for sketching outlines and details and a #118 Pastel light for shading. If you intend the image for watercolor only, then use a larger brush on the "reveal pencil" layer. Suggest Watercolor 4 #50 brush.

For a pencil sketch I like to use a small brush with short strokes and repeating along the details until the density is right. With a tablet and pen (Recommended) it's a lift and stroke action, with a mouse it's click, hold and drag. A large soft brush can be used to add shading.

Once that's done and it can/should take a while to do, patience is the key, you can adjust the contrast/brightness of the mask to alter the strength of strokes.
By default it produces a B+W image but just by turning off the top layer (Gradient Layer) you can have color pencil/watercolor. Once you have applied the brush strokes you can alter the mode of the "Pencil Base" layer to "Darken" for a Watercolor effect.
On the "Watercolor Base layer you can additionally apply the "Art History" brush to increase selectively the watercolor effect.
That's it in a nutshell but don't stop there...
Once you have mastered the technique and are producing nice Pencil sketches or Watercolors try other things....

Like adding a canvas or other texture to the Watercolor layer, changing the mode of the Pencil base layer, Darken or Multiply is good and using the smudge tool at around 50% opacity to smudge parts of the Watercolor layer, leaving some of the image between strokes unsmudged...Hey presto, an oil painting...You can add the texture again at the end and fade it back if the image appears too "Oily". Another trick introduced in the Effie action is to run a USM and smudge out the sharper lines.

Of course it's up to you how you handle the brush strokes, size, type etc. and the best advice I can offer is to spend the time just playing around before you try to create that masterpiece. I can also offer some advice/problem resolution/suggestions etc. via email.
Mike Finn
actionman@slingshot.co.nz

Back to where the action is.....


********************************************************************_*****__Photoshop_nightshots_stacking_technique'>********************************************************************_*****__Photoshop_match_colors_combine_two_images_Scale_your_images_and_match_colors'>********************************************************************_*****_********************************************************************_*****__Photoshop_line_art'>*************************************************************************

*************************************************************************

Photoshop layer masks tutorial
http://www.retouchpro.com/tutorials/?m=show&id=63
Layer masks are useful when you want to make "selective" changes to an image.
Many times, people make the mistake of applying a filter to the entire image, when only a portion of the image needs adjusting. And often, the effect is too strong. Layer masks will allow you to apply filters/adjusments to just the areas that need it, and give you the ability to control how subtle or strong that adjustment is applied to your image. Bonus: You don't have to make selections (but you can).

*************************************************************************
*************************************************************************

Photoshop line art


Duplicated the pic (just to be safe)

On the


duplicate - Filter/Blur/Smart Blur .. in order to pull out the lines I used a setting of HIGH, EDGE ONLY ... used radius 11, threshold 40 (this depends a lot on the picture)
Invert (Ctl-I) - should have black lines on white background.
Now, I wanted to pull out just the lines ... Select, Color Range...and picked black with the eyedrop
Did a COPY to the clipboard (CTL-C) ... yes, probably a way to do this with layers, but this is the way I did it.

All that is copied is what was selected via the COLOR RANGE command


Now I created a new document (File, New, White background)...

then I had a background style that I used (whatever background you want to use).

Did a PASTE (CTL-V) to the new doc.... That's it. I probably should have used a background that didn't have

the little swirls in it.

*************************************************************************


Photoshop match colors combine two images
Scale your images and match colors

Bring the layer containing your subjects into your location picture. When putting my kids into a picture from Tanzania, I scaled down the image of my kids and tried to find a place where they looked as natural as possible.

Unfortunately, they still looked cut out because the color was too bright. If you run into this problem, you have two options.


  • If you have Photoshop CS, try color matching, a feature you can find under Mode > Adjustments. If you select the background image, it will remap the foreground colors to approximate the correct color range with 90 percent to 95 percent accuracy.

  • If you don't have Photoshop CS, or if you want to have more control, you can make the adjustments by hand. While an experienced colorist can just look at the image and make the adjustments, I find it easier to look at the individual channels to match colors on a channel-by-channel basis. Here's how.

Select the foreground and view a single channel (red, green, or blue).

Apply Image > Adjustments > Levels to adjust the foreground. You'll mostly move the midtones (middle slider) back and forth until it looks more natural.

Lather, rinse, repeat with the other two channels.

Go back to the color channel. Hopefully, the two images will look much more like each other.


*************************************************************************

Photoshop nightshots stacking technique

I like to stack most of my night shot pictures. There's a great article on stacking by Shay. Search for "Shay Stacking" and you will find it. The first and last shots were stacked. For all of these shots, I used full manual mode, a Tripod (a MUST), White Balance set to Indoors, Manual Focus set to Infinity, an Aperature of F4, and Shutter speeds anywhere from 4 to 8 seconds. I didn't use any filters. For the first pic, I think I stacked 9 different images to get a good sharpness and low noise.


*************************************************************************______

Here are 10 steps you can take to get good night shot photos

1) You will need a steady tripod.

2) Of course you need darkness ;-) Although night shots no more than an hour after sunset are usually the best because the sky has a nice dark blue color.

3) Set the ISO 100 so that you have the least amount of noise.

4) Use the indoor or incandescent white balance preset, it tend to give the best color rendition. Auto can also work on occasion.

5) Set the focus to infinity if the scene is right for that.

6) Set the exposure. You can let the camera handle this by using Scene mode set to twilight, or you can use manual mode.

7) Manual mode may lead to sharper pictures. For a cityscape try F4 and 8 seconds should give you good results. For a darker scene use a longer exposure (10 seconds all the way up to 30 seconds). If the photo still comes out too dark, then try a higher ISO (200 or 400).

8) Use the self timer to take the exposure so the camera is as steady as possible.

9) There is usually no need to use the flash, unless you want to light up something nearby.

10) Experiment! It is the best way to learn what to do , and what not to do.


This photo is a combination of different exposures but all taken at F4. It gives you an idea of what is possible with even a digital camera at night.

Image control: 50% | 100% | 200% | Expand width | Contract MORE \/


************************************************************************

Shay Stevens

TIFF mode to minimize micro noise (only noticable at 400% magnification to me).

3 exposures at F4 and 10 seconds (for shadow detail)

3 exposures at F4 and 2.5 seconds (for highlight detail)

The 3, 10 second exposures were averaged together using layers with a 50% opacity to reduce noise. The image was flattened to create a single photo with lower noise.
The 3, 2.5 second exposures were averaged together using layers with a 50% opacity to reduce noise and flattened.
The two resulting images were composited together so that the highlight and shadow areas showed up and gave the appearance of a wider dynamic range. Then normal image editing (saturation, unsharp mask, etc) finished it off.
Future experiments will try a wider dynamic range using a +2EV and -2EV exposure to work with.
This is by far the sharpest image of the night time Seattle skyline I have made. It also has made me very satisfied with the sharpness of the F707 (I was having serious doubts there for a while when I was using -2 in camera sharpening). So if you find yourself needing sharper images give this a try and see what you think
*************************************************************************__________

Here is what went into creating the photo:

In-camera sharpening set to "0"
TIFF mode to minimize micro noise (only noticable at 400% magnification to me).

3 exposures at F4 and 10 seconds (for shadow detail)

3 exposures at F4 and 2.5 seconds (for highlight detail)

The 3, 10 second exposures were averaged together using layers with a 50% opacity to reduce noise. The image was flattened to create a single photo with lower noise.

The 3, 2.5 second exposures were averaged together using layers with a 50% opacity to reduce noise and flattened.
The two resulting images were composited together so that the highlight and shadow areas showed up and gave the appearance of a wider dynamic range. Then normal image editing (saturation, unsharp mask, etc) finished it off.
Future experiments will try a wider dynamic range using a +2EV and -2EV exposure to work with.
This is by far the sharpest image of the night time Seattle skyline I have made. It also has made me very satisfied with the sharpness of the F707 (I was having serious doubts there for a while when I was using -2 in camera sharpening). So if you find yourself needing sharper images give this a try and see what you think..

*******************************************************************
______________________________________________________________________

BASIC SETTINGS

Hard to say specifically because each scene has it's own unique challenge, but here are some generic settings that may get the job done and or allow you to experiment from there.
>

> outside/bright sunlight

F5.6 - 1/1000 - ISO 100

> outside/shade

F4 - 1/125 - ISO 100

> outside/flowers

F5.6 - 1/1000 - ISO 100

> outside/moving objects (bicycle)

F5.6 - 1/1000 - ISO 100

> indoors low light

F2 - 1/30 - ISO 400
--

Shay

_________________________________________________________________________

POST-PROCESSING

Shay, i hope you dont mind. i took all your answers and put them into one post. This way if anybody wants to copy and paste the whole instruction set into a word document, they can. just your responses to questions. i think it makes sense but feel free to edit this, anybody, so it works better.

Here is what went into creating the photo:

In-camera sharpening set to "0"

TIFF mode to minimize micro noise (only noticable at 400% magnification to me).

3 exposures at F4 and 10 seconds (for shadow detail)

3 exposures at F4 and 2.5 seconds (for highlight detail)


The 3, 10 second exposures were averaged together using layers with a 50% opacity to reduce noise. The image was flattened to create a single photo with lower noise.
The 3, 2.5 second exposures were averaged together using layers with a 50% opacity to reduce noise and flattened.
The two resulting images were composited together so that the highlight and shadow areas showed up and gave the appearance of a wider dynamic range. Then normal image editing (saturation, unsharp mask, etc) finished it off.
Future experiments will try a wider dynamic range using a +2EV and -2EV exposure to work with.
The +1EV image was palced on the lower layer, and the -1EV was placed on the upper layer. I used the eraser and removed the dark portion of the part of the -1EV image so that the +1EV version showed through, then the opacity of the top layer was reduced until I had a nice balance optically.

Well the last step is the tricky part, if you do a 50% opacity on the upper dark image layer, it will give you a dark shadowed area. So what I did was used the eraser on the dark layer image in the shadow area so that the highlight image layer below showed through. Next I set the opacity of the upper dark layer to 75% if I remember right to get a little of the brightness from below to help out the highlights. It balanced out the photo that way. Once the two layers look right then you can save as a JPG.

The biggest improvement in sharpness came from using F4 and 0 sharpening in the camera. Combined this with the stacking and you get a clean sharp image.
well you *know* this is not for everyday shooting. And most likely more valuable for a limited type of shot. And all the layers were for noise reduction. But the shooting at F4 and 0 in-camera sharpening can improve any shot where those settings make sense. The other thing of course is the use of the tripod. The fine details just can't be resolved in a handheld shot of this type.
I took the three images and placed them on their own layer. I set the top 2 layers opacity to 50% and left the bottom layers opacity at 100%. That will average out the image data and each image has equal weight. If you use 33% and 67% the 33% image will be too transparent and the 67% image will be too prominent.
It depends on what you are trying to achieve. If you are after noise reduction, then you would be better off with burst 3 mode to get 3 identical exposures. If you are interested in increasing the dynamic range of the photo then you could use the bracket mode set to 1EV increments. I have not yet tried using three exposures to increase dynamic range, and so do not have any specific recommendations for that.
I use a sturdy Manfroto/Bogen tripod with the remote control to trigger the camera. I wish the remote had exposure controls, but it does not so I must gently adjust it on the camera. I make sure to determine the exposures settings I need before I begin the shot. Then when it comes time to change the setting, it is a quick and low impact procedure.

The exposure was determined by zooming in on the Space needle and spot metering off the center column. I knew that to get a proper white off the needle I would have to shoot a +1EV (10 seconds) shot from what the meter was reading off the Space needle and the highlights I guessed at -1EV (2.5 seconds). It was cold so I did not try any other variations. But next time I may try to braket more versions.

______________________________________________________________

more on layering

The water is about one stop brighter

the foliage in the bottom left is about 4 stops brighter

and the cityscape is about 2 stops dimmer

Additionally, I added a round gradient (transparent to white - layer blending soft light - layer opacity 50%) to reduce the amount of vignetting visible in the image.


There is no trick really to blending exposures, all you do is place each exposure (Lets assume you have 3 exposures 30 seconds, 4 seconds, 1/2 second) on a seperate layer and erase the areas of each image that do not contribute to a good exposure:
Place your 1/2 second image on the top layer

Place your 30 second image on the middle layer

Place your 4 second image on the bottom layer

Now using the magic wand, select the brightest portion of the top layer with a tolerance of 25 - 50. Feather the selection to have a nice transition (5 - 15 pixels), invert the selection and delete. You should be left with just the highlights of the image.


Now move to the middle layer, use the magic wand and select the darkest area of the image with a tolerance of 50 - 75. Feather the selection 5 - 15, invert the selection and delete. You should be left with the dark areas of the image.
If there are any areas that look unnatural, you can use the eraser to fine tune, or experiement with the selection process with the magic wand.

Image control: 50% | 100% | 200% | Expand width | Contract width | New window




1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page