May 2013 2013 The Apostles Post



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MAY 2013

2013

The Apostles Post

Church of the Holy Apostles

26238 North Highway 59

Wauconda, Illinois

(847)526-7148

hapostles@sbcglobal.net

www.holyapostleswauconda.org




The Apostles Post

Church of the Holy Apostles

26238 North Highway 59

Wauconda, Illinois

(847)526-7148

hapostles@sbcglobal.net





We are a welcoming, compassionate community seeking to grow in Christ and express God’s love for all, through worship, fellowship, service and prayer.




FROM THE VICAR'S DESK (M. C. Gillette) http://fc02.deviantart.net/fs15/f/2007/013/6/4/illuminated_text_practice_by_Zerahoc.jpg

http://www.workingpreacher.org/dear_wp.aspx?article_id=681



Last month I wrote about stories, and how we are going to be more intentional about increasing our comfort level with "seamlessly integrating stories of our experiences as 'Holy Apostles' into the conversations we already have on a daily basis."

Then, lo and behold, today I read an article by one of my favorite Christian commentators (David Lose, 'The Never Ending Story'), which I am pretty much going to simply plagiarize here. The article begins by positing that the primary challenge facing the Christian Church in North America in the 21st century is that for most people, God is no longer a primary character in the story of their lives. It's not, Professor Lose suggests, that people don't believe in God, it's just that they don't think about God very much. Further, he asserts, the biblical story – the narrative that teaches us to recognize God's activity in the world – is relatively and increasingly unfamiliar to us and no longer serves as the primary source of the stories we use as we try to make some sense out of our lives.

Why, he asks, especially for those of us who do attend church on a regular basis, who hear these stories read and preached, would this be the case? Why do we rarely reference examples from the biblical narrative in our ordinary conversations and activities? "My hunch," he says, "is that most folks see the biblical stories as the history of what God did 'once upon a time,' but they don’t see them as connecting to their own lives, today, in a meaningful way. Not that anyone would say that out loud, of course, as we’ve been trained to believe and repeat that the Bible is a very, very important book (which is why, of course, we are so embarrassed about how poorly we know it!). But, quite frankly, the stories are just odd enough, just unusual enough, and just foreign enough to our day-to-day experience that we don’t pretend to understand them let alone feel confident at connecting them to our daily lives."

Professor Lose recommends two correctives, at least as a start. The first is focused on the preacher. Professor Lose urges preachers to persistently remind folks that the Gospel writers themselves did not imagine they were telling over-and-done stories about things that happened in the past. Rather, they were making what they believed were revolutionary claims that they hoped would shape the immediate present and future of everyone who read them. The Gospel writers, in other words, have invited us to make the story they tell our story. Sometimes this is even actually relatively clear. For example, when at the Last Supper (John 17:20) Jesus prays to God for care and protection of his disciples, and says "I ask not only on behalf of these, but also on behalf of those who will believe in me through their word," we are being told that Jesus' personal petition reaches across the millennia to include us. Likewise, in the story of Thomas which was our lesson a few weeks ago, Jesus says “Have you believed because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe.” And guess what? We are included in the group of those who have believed and who struggle to continue believing without ever seeing the risen Lord with our own eyes or touching him with our own hands. The never-ending-story that is outlined for us in the biblical narrative, in other words, started with creation and continues to the end of time, meaning that we're all characters living smack-dab in the middle of it, characters invited to learn from the faith, fear, courage, and mistakes of those who have come before, but also invited to actively participate in God's ongoing work to save and bless all the world, to help shape the narrative for those who will follow.

The second corrective is focused on the congregation. A version of this was actually suggested a little while ago by our Warden, Sandy Brown; and now she has research data to back her instincts up. This data shows that if members of a congregation read the text being preached sometime during the week before the sermon, they remember it better. And if they are invited to think about that passage by pondering a simple question or two, their level of engagement skyrockets. They not only remember better, but discuss their answers with others, ask additional questions, and are more likely to embrace the biblical story as the story of their lives.
All the lessons for the upcoming month are published in the monthly newsletter, of course, and I usually preach on the Gospel – but not always. So, for a while at least, I am going to try to send an 'email blast' at the beginning of each week with the text for the upcoming Sunday, along with a question or two for you to consider. We'll see how we like this. And if you really want to be actively involved, read two weeks ahead and send me your questions to use.

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UPCOMING SERVICES – CHURCH OF THE HOLY APOSTLES – MAY 2013

Sunday

05 May


8 & 10:30 a.m.

Sunday

12 May


8 & 10:30 a.m.

Sunday

19 May

8 & 10:30 a.m.

Day of Pentecost


Sunday

26 May


8 & 10:30 a.m.

Trinity Sunday



Friday

31 May


7:00 p.m.

Taizé Prayer



Scheduled

Presider:

Gillette

Preacher:

Gillette


Scheduled

Presider:

Gillette

Preacher:

Bullion


Scheduled

Presider:

Gillette

Preacher:

Gillette


Scheduled

Presider:

Gillette

Preacher:

Gillette


Scheduled Presider:

L.- Southall



6th Sunday of
Easter (C)

7th Sunday of
Easter (C)

Day of Pentecost

Whitsunday (C)



1st Sunday after Pentecost

Trinity Sunday



Taizé Service of Silence and Light

FIRST

LESSON


Acts

16:9-15
RESPONSE

Psalm

67
SECOND LESSON



Revelation

21:10, 22-22:5


GOSPEL

John


5:1-9

FIRST

LESSON


Acts

16:16-34
RESPONSE

Psalm

97
SECOND



LESSON

Revelation

22:12-14, 16-17, 20-21
GOSPEL

John

17:20-26



FIRST

LESSON


Acts

9:36-43
RESPONSE

Psalm

23
SECOND LESSON



Revelation

7:9-17
GOSPEL

John

10:22-30


FIRST

LESSON


Proverbs

8:1-4, 22-31


RESPONSE

Psalm


8
SECOND LESSON

Romans


5:1-5
GOSPEL

John


16:12-15





SOME CHURCHY STUFF (M. C. Gillette)

In this monthly article, we look at terms and definitions of things you might see or hear around church. Nothing fancy here – these entries are out of the Armentrout/Slocum An Episcopal Dictionary of the Church, sometimes supplemented by me, and sometimes simply copied directly. If something in particular piques your interest, let me know, and we’ll deal with it in more depth.

CAPPADOCIANS (aka CAPPADOCIAN FATHERS). Three important theologians of the Patristic Era (generally defined as the first 5-8 centuries of the church, during which the basics of 'orthodox' faith and theology – such as the natures of Christ and the Spirit, and the doctrine of the Trinity – were hashed out). Basil the Great of Caesarea (330-379), his brother Gregory of Nyssa (c. 330-395), and their friend Gregory of Nazianzus (329-389) all came from Cappadocia, a Roman province in what is now Turkey. In their lives and literary works, the three friends were largely responsible for extending the Nicene doctrine of the Trinity to the person of the Holy Spirit, and thus to the final defeat of the Arians (who denied the divinity of Christ), semi-Arians (sorta' fence-sitters who agreed the Son was like the Father but not co-equal in dignity or eternal existence), and Macedonians (who denied the divinity of the Holy Spirit). They also gave a final definitive shape to eastern monasticism, and contributed greatly to the formation of Orthodox theology, spirituality, and liturgy. Oooh-rah, gentlemen!
CARDINAL VIRTUES. No. Not all the nice things that might be said about the pretty red birds we all like to see on Christmas cards and at our bird feeders. And no, not the positive qualities that may be resident in any of those guys who just got together in Rome and elected a Jesuit from Buenos Aires as Pope Francis I. And no, not the "counting numbers" that show us we have 3 pictures in this entry, 1 of which shows 4 ladies. Rather, the cardinal virtues – they are typically represented as ladies – were first stated in Book Four of Plato's Republic, written about 380 BCE. Aristotle developed the cardinal virtues in his Ethics as moral virtues, the perfection of human powers as they lead to happiness. Translating from the Greek, the cardinal virtues are referred to in English as wisdom, courage, temperance, and justice. Translating the equivalent English from Latin, they are referred to as

prudence, fortitude, temperance, and justice. 'Prudence' is the perfection of the intellect as a matter of practical wisdom. It concerns knowing what to do and when to do it. 'Fortitude' is the perfection of the will in terms of being neither timid nor foolhardy but holding steadfast to what needs to be done. 'Temperance' is the perfection of the appetites, seeking enough but not too much. 'Justice' is the perfection of the whole in which the parts are fairly balanced in relationship to the whole. The concept of the cardinal virtues was 'translated' into a Christian context early on. In the 4th century Ambrose (Bishop of Milan, Doctor of the Church, and all around fiery character) assumed the traditional understanding of the cardinal virtues in his instruction for the clergy in De officiis Ministrorum. Other theologians, most notably Augustine (5th century) in On the Morals of the Catholic Church, tie the virtues to the ultimate end of the love of God. For Thomas Aquinas (13th century), the cardinal virtues form the basis for moral growth and development in all persons, although for Christians they can only be understood and fully achieved through God's grace as given in the theological virtues. Thomas draws his thought to its most systematic formulation in his Summa Theologica, in which pretty much all subsequent Roman Catholic thought was grounded. (And, we should note, much of Anglican thought at the time of the English Reformation and in Anglo-catholic moral theology arising from the Oxford Movement, a 19th century movement which reasserted the apostolic and catholic heritage of Anglicanism.)

Images: Cappadocia = http://www.cappadocia.info/images/turkey.png


Icon = http://www.eikonografos.com/album/albums/uploads/ierarxes/normal_oi_treis_ierarxai1.jpg

Bird = http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-zo-udJsGX_k/T8Lc5HjvT1I/AAAAAAAAAGg/5p2eoQhrkQ8/s1600/4VirtuesT_P_F_J_2.jpg

Cardinal = http://www.catholicsun.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/20130217nw292.jpg

Virtues = http://dutchlakefarm.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/male-cardinal.jpg
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HERE AND THERE (M. C. Gillette)

In this on-going article, we pull things from our various Diocesan calendars and church websites so see what’s going on around us. For more information about what's happening at the Diocesan Headquarters and the Cathedral of Saint James, you can always visit their websites: http://www.episcopalchicago.org or www.saintjamescathedral.org/ For a direct link to Diocesan and Cathedral events calendars, go to:www.episcopalchicago.org/our-diocese/calendars/

Health and Wellness in a Frantic World -- Seasons of Health Ministry Conference

Join National Episcopal Health Ministries for the May 9-11 Seasons of Health Ministry Conference at the Maritime Institute near Baltimore, MD. 

Presenters include the Rev. Dr. Amy E. Richter of St. Anne's Episcopal Church in Annapolis and the Rev. Dr. Scott Stoner of Living Compass. Download a brochure for a schedule, listing of workshops and offerings and pricing. A Veterans Care track and an Ethics track are also available.  Visit the Episcopal Health Ministries website for online registration. To learn about scholarships, please talk with Maryfran Crist via email or by phone at 815.257.7012.

Diocesan Convention to Reconvene to consider reunification with Quincy
The 175th Convention of the Diocese of Chicago will reconvene on June 8 at St. James Cathedral for the purpose of considering the proposed reunification with the Episcopal Diocese of Quincy.

 In November 2012, the 175th Convention unanimously passed Resolution A-175 affirming the Diocese of Chicago's intent to pursue reunification with Quincy and directing the bishop, with the advice and consent of the Standing Committee, to seek approval of the Quincy Reunion Agreement. At its conclusion, the convention was recessed rather than adjourned so that it could be called back into session to consider a final reunification agreement.

In May, members of the diocese are invited to attend one of four information sessions to learn more about the proposed reunification of the two dioceses, which were split to accommodate growth in 1877.

Since 2008, the Episcopal Diocese of Quincy, based in Peoria, has been forging a new identity and mission after its bishop and about 60% of its members broke away to become founders of the conservative Anglican Church of North America.

  Information Sessions will be held from 6:30-8:30 p.m. as follows:


  • May 9 - St. James the Less, Northfield 

  • May 15 - Church of the Transfiguration, Palos Park 

  • May 17 - St. James Commons, Chicago
  • May 29 - St. James, West Dundee   


Light refreshments will be served. Register online.  

  

June 8 Reconvening the 175th Diocesan Convention



Advanced registration is available online for the June 8 convention at St. James Commons. Advanced registration for groups is open through May 24 and for individuals through May 31. After May 31, please plan to register onsite by bringing a completed onsite registration form with you. 

Congregations, please send your 2012 delegates, not your 2013 delegates.

Questions? Please talk with Director of Operations Courtney Reid at 312.751.6725 or via email.


Bishop's Associates Annual Spring Luncheon

The annual Bishop's Associates spring luncheon will be held on Thursday, May 16 at the Union League Club in honor of Bishop Lee and Bishop Epting. Refreshments will be available at 11:30 am and lunch will be served at 12:15 pm. Bishop Lee will be the guest speaker and the Bishop's Award will be presented. RSVP online by May 10. The cost is $50 per person for single tickets and $475 for a table of 10. Visit the website for more information about the Bishop's Associates.

Taizé pilgrimage for young adults – Share with friends and neighbors who might be interested!

On May 24-27, a Taizé pilgrimage for young people ages 18-35 will take place in Red Shirt, South Dakota, a tiny village at the edge of the Badlands on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The outdoor gathering will include meditative prayer together three times a day, Bible study, workshops, small group sharing, and meals together, provided by the local Lakota people. Check out the Facebook event and learn more about the May gathering. 







PARISH LIFE

..to everyone whose prayers, efforts, contributions, and presence helped make our Holy Week and Easter Sunday so wonderful. Cleaning and polishing, organizing and arranging, baking and cooking, flowers, pot-lucks, transportation, ironing, miraculous stain and wax removal, organs and trumpets and bells and song, scores of bulletins, Alleluias, post-it notes, silence, laughter, fellowship, and all the things I didn't even realize happened but would have missed had they not been done – your various gifts and ministries make the resurrection something real and meaningful. Thank you so much for everything you do – God bless you. image: http://www.michellecederberg.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/thank-you.jpg


SPRING CLEAN-UP DAY All hands on deck on May 18 from 9am until noon for Parish Clean-Up Day! The Bishop’s Committee is developing a list of important tasks, both outdoor and indoor, so grab your gloves and join the fun as we spruce up our buildings and grounds.

NEED A RIDE?  If you would like to participate in Sunday worship or a special service or event but aren't able to drive yourself, please let us know!  It is quite likely we can arrange to have someone give you a ride.  Just send (Mother) Martha an email at marthagillette@att.net, or leave her a phone message at 847.226.9043.  (You can call the church office, too, at 847.526.7148, but remember -- we are only in the office on Tuesdays.)  It's important to have you with us!

SHAWL MINISTRY: Our Shawl Ministry ladies continue to knit and crochet, steadily meeting the needs for shawls to be gifted.  We have also been blessed with a generous donation of 17 crocheted shawls from Peggy Liskey, a lady in the community.  Plans are currently in the works for several shawls to be donated to the Veterans at the VA Nursing Home in North Chicago.  Angie is coordinating the donation.  Betty and Johnna have been busy knitting hats for those in need. We invite you to join us for fellowship, or the knitting and crocheting.  We will teach those who would like to learn. Meetings in May will be on May 13 and 27 from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
BOOK DISCUSSION GROUP: Book Group has a schedule planned for the remainder of 2013 - we hope you will join us for one or more meetings this year. We enjoy lively conversation, good food & wine and outstanding fellowship. All we are missing is you! Book group normally meets the 4th Tuesday of the month at 7:30 pm, rotating among members' homes. Please contact Lisa Earley if you need more information. Here is our schedule for the next few months: May 28 The Paris Wife (McLain) at the home of Julie Zuidema

June 25 The Story of Edgar Sawtelle (Wroblewski)  location TBD

July 23  The Other Boleyn Girl (Gregory)   location TBD

August 27 The Advantage of Being a Wallflower (Chbosky)   location TBD


DIAPERS NEEDED! (M. C. Gillette)

Did you know that Food Stamps, Link, WIC, public aid, and Medicare do not cover diapers? That means that the 1 in 4 Illinois babies born into poverty, the 15-20% of adults over age 65 suffering some degree of incontinence, and the disabled of any age who need diapers must purchase them out of their consumable income. A healthy change of diapers costs a minimum of $100 per month for all ages. Many with low- or fixed-incomes can't afford this, leaving infants and the elderly at significantly increased risk for health issues, abuse, isolation, and deepening financial distress. (Child care costs may be subsidized for low-income families, but the disposable diapers child care facilities require are not, meaning that parents who cannot afford the diapers cannot access the child care which would allow them to work.)

The Diaper Bank Partnership of Lake County was established in 2012 to help address this issue. Like the Food Bank, the Diaper Bank does not meet a family's entire need, bur rather serves as a supplemental source, providing eligible individuals with 20-30 diapers monthly.
Also like the Food Bank, the Diaper Bank stands in constant need of donations. At the moment, however, there is a particularly urgent need for Newborn, Size 6, Girl and Boy pull-ups of all sizes, and Small and Medium adult sizes. Donated diapers will be collected by the Diaper Bank to be distributed to clients through one of several assistance agencies. (Agencies served by the Diaper Bank include Cuba and Wauconda Townships, Mount St. Joseph, Society of St. Vincent DePaul, and Love INC, among others.) You can make a monetary donation, or bring diapers to church as you bring food for the Food Pantry (we can get a separate box for diaper donations).
Please consider supporting this ministry. You can ask Mother Martha questions about Diaper Banks in general; Lake County-specific questions are best addressed to the President, Stephanie Maioriello, at Wauconda Township, 827.306.3091 or smaioriello@gmail.com


THRIVE: To grow strongly and vigorously; to flourish


Thrive Update – May 2013

Have you seen 'word clouds,' also known as 'wordles?' They are pictures made from the words of a passage of text or a conversation. The most frequently used words are shown in the largest type.

 

Bishop Lee recently wrote that he'd like to think that if you made a word cloud from the conversations we have been having with one another in the Diocese of Chicago, the word THRIVE would jump out at you.

The Thrive workshop for April focused on Change, Conflict, Loss, and Reconciliation. If we did a wordle for that workshop, the largest word might be 'mokita.' 'Mokita' is a word in the Kivila language, spoken on the largest of the Papua New Guinean Trobriand Islands. Roughly translated, it means 'that which everyone knows and no one speaks of.' We might talk about 'elephants in the middle of the room' instead, but the bottom line is that leaving the 'mokitas' unspoken and the 'elephants' un-discussed diminishes the opportunity of any congregational community to – well, thrive.
As always, materials from the April Thrive workshop are available in binders located on a shelf in the wall-to-wall bookcase in the back of Lincoln Hall. Have a read – ask a question – identify a 'mokita' – start a conversation – help us thrive!


May Birthdays May Anniversaries

May 23 Alton Ellegood May 16 Lucy and Carl Reed

May 31 Don Hoebbel May 18 Alicja and Graham Southall



MAY 2013 (See page 2 for Service Schedule.)

SUN

MON

TUE


WED

THU

FRI

SAT










1

2

3

4

Food Pantry

10am-noon


5


6


7

8

9

10

11

Food Pantry

10am-noon


12

13
7:00pm

Shawl


Ministry

14


15

16


17

18

Spring Clean-Up Day 9am-noon


Food Pantry

10am-noon



19


20


21

7:00pm


Bishop’s

Committee

Meeting
7:30pm

Book Group



22

23


24

25

Food Pantry

10am-noon


26

3:45pm

Wauconda Care

Center Service



27

7:00pm


Shawl

Ministry


28

29

30

31





FROM: Church of the Holy Apostles

26238 North Highway 59

Wauconda, Illinois 60084

TO:






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