Mbs course Outline 13-14 (Updated on November 28, 2013) Centre of Buddhist Studies


BSTC6034 Mindfulness, Stress Reduction and Psychotherapy

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BSTC6034

Mindfulness, Stress Reduction and Psychotherapy

Lecturer

Dr. S.H. Ma

Tel: 2987-2947

Email: shelenma@hku.hk

Schedule: 2nd Semester; Sunday 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (except as stated in italics below)



Class Venue: Rm. 404, T.T.Tsui Building (except otherwise notified)
Course Description
This course aims at providing students with the basic knowledge and understanding of the application of Buddhist mindfulness training in stress reduction and psychotherapy. It covers the latest research and theories on mindfulness training in the health sector. This is a practical as well as theoretical course. Students will take part in the eight-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Programme. They will participate in the practices and exercises in class and at home, in order to acquire an experiential as well as intellectual understanding of the subject.
In order to ensure that each student will have ample opportunity to participate in class and receive adequate attention and guidance, the class size is limited to 30. For details of the enrollment procedures, please refer to the Important Notes for Course Selection 2013-2014 on the Centre’s web site.
Course outline


Class

Date

Time

Topic

1


26 Jan 2014 (Sun)

9:30am – 12:30pm

Application of Mindfulness




2 Feb 2014 (Sun)

No Class (Chinese New Year Holiday)

2

9 Feb 2014 (Sun)

9:30am – 12:30pm

Impact of Mindfulness

3

16 Feb 2014 (Sun)

9:30am – 12:30pm

MBSR Class 1

4

23 Feb 2014 (Sun)

9:30am – 12:30pm

MBSR Class 2

5

2 Mar 2014 (Sun)

9:30am – 12:30pm

MBSR Class 3

6

9 Mar 2014 (Sun)

9:30am – 12:30pm


MBSR Class 4

7

16 Mar 2014 (Sun)

9:30am – 12:30pm

MBSR Class 5

8

23 Mar 2014 (Sun)

6:30pm – 9:30pm

MBSR Class 6




30 Mar 2014 (Sun)

No Class (Reading week1 for this course)




6 Apr 2014 (Sun)

No Class (Reading week2 for this course)

9,10

13 Apr 2014 (Sun)

9:30am – 5:00pm

MBSR All-Day Class

11

20 Apr 2014 (Sun)

9:30am – 12:30pm

MBSR Class 7

12,13


27 Apr 2014 (Sun)

9:30am – 5:00pm

MBSR Class 8 & Seminar


Details for the reading for each class are available on Moodle.
Class participation
Apart from the two introductory lectures, each class consists of experiential exercises, discussion and a tutorial. The course is based on the 8-week Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction Program and Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy. In order to acquire an experiential as well as intellectual understanding of the subject, students are encouraged to participate as fully as possible in all the class activities. The emphasis of class participation is not on performance, but rather on the willingness to explore, learn and contribute at a level that is appropriate for the individual as well as the class. To derive maximum benefit from the course, students should be prepared to spend at least an hour everyday on homework exercises.

(English practice CDs are available at www.mindfulnesscds.com : Series 1. Cantonese CDs are available from the lecturer.)



Assessment

Attendance (10%)

As experiential exercises form an important part of the course, students are expected to attend, at a minimum, 80% of the classes, i.e. 11 out of the 13 classes.

Mid-Term Reflection on the Practice(30%)

Each student is to submit through Moodle on or before 16th March, 2014 a short essay consisting of 1,500 to 2,000 words reflecting on their mindfulness practice in the first half of the program.

Essay (60%)

Each student is to submit through Moodle an essay consisting of 3,000 to 4,000 words, excluding footnotes, endnotes, bibliography and appendices, on or before 11th May, 2014. The list of essay topics is available on Moodle.


Details of the requirements for the above assignments are available on Moodle.

Optional

Daily Practice Records

Each student may hand in a daily homework record every week, so that they may receive written feedback in the following week to assist them in their practice.


Term-End Reflective Writing

Each student may submit a piece of reflective writing on their experience of the course within a fortnight after completion of the course, to help them to deepen their understanding of the practice. The assignment, though not graded, will be returned with feedback.


Reference Books

Text Book

*Anālayo. (2003). Satipatthāna – The Direct Path to Realization. Birmingham: Windhorse.

Commentary On Satipaţţhāna Sutta

Goenka, S.N. (1998). Satipaţţhāna Sutta Discourses. Seattle: Vipassana Research Publications.

Sangharakshita (2003). Living with Awareness: A Guide to the Satipaţţhāna Sutta. Birmingham: Windhorse.

Thich Nhat Hanh. (1990). Transformation and Healing: The Sutra on the Four Establishments of Mindfulness. Berkeley: Parallax.

Silananda, U. (2002). The Four Foundations of Mindfulness. Boston: Wisdom.

Commentary on Ānāpānasati Sutta

Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu. (Translated by Santikaro Bhikkhu.) (1997). Mindfulness with Breathing: A Manual for Serious Beginners. Boston: Wisdom.

Rosenberg, L. (1998). Breath by Breath: The Liberating Practice of Insight Meditation. Boston: Shambhala.
Mindfulness Meditation

Ajahn Brahm. (2006). Happiness Through Meditation. Boston: Wisdom.

Goldstein, J. (1993). Insight Meditation - The Practice of Freedom. Dublin: Gill & Macmillan.

Goldstein, J. & Kornfield, J. (1987). Seeking the Heart of Wisdom: The Path of Insight Meditation. Boston: Shambhala.

Kabat-Zinn, J. (1994). Wherever You Go There You Are. New York: Hyperion.

*Nyanaponika Thera. (1965). The Heart of Buddhist Meditation. San Francisco: Weiser.

Sayadaw U Indaka (Translated by Ven Ariya Nani). (2004). Metta: The Practice of Loving-Kindness as the Foundation for Insight Meditation Practice. Malaysia: Private Circulation.

Sayadaw U Pandita. (1993). In This Very Life: The Liberation Teachings of the Buddha. Boston: Wisdom.

*Gunaratana, H. (2002). Mindfulness in Plain English. Boston: Wisdom.

*Gunaratana, H. (2009). Beyond Mindfulness in Plain English: An Introductory guide to Deeper States of Meditation. Boston: Wisdom.

Mindfulness-Based Interventions

Cayoun, B.(2011).Mindfulness-integrated CBT: Principles and Practice. West Sussex : Wiley.

Crane, R. (2009). Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy: Distinctive Features. New York: Routledge.

Didonna, F. (2009). Clinical Handbook of Mindfulness. New York: Springer.

Germer, C.K. (2009). The Mindful Path to Self-Compassion: Freeing Yourself from Destructive Thoughts and Emotions. New York: Guilford.

Garner-Fix, J. (2009). The Mindfulness Solution to Pain: Step-by-Step Techniques for Chronic Pain Management. Oakland: New Harbinger.

Germer, C.K., Siegel, R.D. & Fulton, P.R. (Ed.) (2005). Mindfulness and Psychotherapy. New York: Guilford.

*Kabat-Zinn, J. (1990). Full Catastrophe Living: The Program of the Stress Reduction Clinic at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. New York: Dell.

Kabat-Zinn, J. (2005). Coming to Our Senses: Healing Ourselves and the World Through Mindfulness. London: Piatkus.

Mace, C. (2007). Mindfulness and Mental Health: Therapy, Theory and Science. London: Routledge.

McCown, D., Reibel, D., Micozzi, M.S. (2013). Teaching Mindfulness: A Practical Guide for Clinicians and Educators. New York: Springer.

Roemer, L., Orsillo, S.M. (2008). Mindfulness- and Acceptance-Based Behavioral Therapies in Practice. New York: Guilford.

Santorelli, S. (1999). Heal Thy Self - Lessons on Mindfulness in Medicine. New York: Bell Tower.

Schoeberlein, D. (2009). Mindful Teaching and Teaching Mindfulness: A Guide for Anyone Who Teaches Anything. Boston: Wisdom.

*Segal, Z. V., Williams, J. M. G., & Teasdale, J. D. (2002). Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Depression - A New Approach to Preventing Relapse. New York: Guilford.

Thich Nhat Hanh (2001). Anger: Wisdom for Cooling the Flames. New York: Riverhead.

Walser, R.D., Westrup, D. (2009). The Mindful Couple: How Acceptance and Mindfulness Can Lead You to the Love You Want. Oakland: New Harbinger.

*Williams, M., Teasdale, J., Segal, Z., Kabat-Zinn, J. (2007). The Mindful Way Through Depression: Freeing Yourself with Chronic Unhappiness (with Audio CD). New York: Guilford.

*Williams, M., Penman, D. (2011). Mindfulness: A Practical Guide To Finding Peace In A Frantic World. London: Piatkus.

Wilson, K. G. (2009). Mindfulness for Two: An Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Approach to Mindfulness in Psychotherapy. Oakland: New Harbinger.

*Highly Recommended

Assessment

Attendance (10%)

As experiential exercises form an important part of the course, students are expected to attend, at a minimum, 80% of the classes, i.e. 11 out of the 13 classes.


Mid-Term Reflection on the Practice(30%)

Each student is to submit through Moodle on or before 16th March, 2014 a short essay consisting of 1,500 to 2,000 words reflecting on their mindfulness practice in the first half of the program.


Essay (60%)

Each student is to submit through Moodle an essay consisting of 3,000 to 4,000 words, excluding footnotes, endnotes, bibliography and appendices, on or before 11th May, 2014. The list of essay topics is available on Moodle.


Details of the requirements for the above assignments are available on Moodle.

Optional

Daily Practice Records

Each student may hand in a daily homework record every week, so that they may receive written feedback in the following week to assist them in their practice.


Term-End Reflective Writing

Each student may submit a piece of reflective writing on their experience of the course within a fortnight after completion of the course, to help them to deepen their understanding of the practice. The assignment, though not graded, will be returned with feedback.


Reference Books

Text Book

*Anālayo. (2003). Satipatthāna – The Direct Path to Realization. Birmingham: Windhorse.

Commentary On Satipaţţhāna Sutta

Goenka, S.N. (1998). Satipaţţhāna Sutta Discourses. Seattle: Vipassana Research Publications.

Sangharakshita (2003). Living with Awareness: A Guide to the Satipaţţhāna Sutta. Birmingham: Windhorse.

Thich Nhat Hanh. (1990). Transformation and Healing: The Sutra on the Four Establishments of Mindfulness. Berkeley: Parallax.

Silananda, U. (2002). The Four Foundations of Mindfulness. Boston: Wisdom.

Commentary on Ānāpānasati Sutta

Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu. (Translated by Santikaro Bhikkhu.) (1997). Mindfulness with Breathing: A Manual for Serious Beginners. Boston: Wisdom.

Rosenberg, L. (1998). Breath by Breath: The Liberating Practice of Insight Meditation. Boston: Shambhala.
Mindfulness Meditation

Ajahn Brahm. (2006). Happiness Through Meditation. Boston: Wisdom.

Goldstein, J. (1993). Insight Meditation - The Practice of Freedom. Dublin: Gill & Macmillan.

Goldstein, J. & Kornfield, J. (1987). Seeking the Heart of Wisdom: The Path of Insight Meditation. Boston: Shambhala.

Kabat-Zinn, J. (1994). Wherever You Go There You Are. New York: Hyperion.

*Nyanaponika Thera. (1965). The Heart of Buddhist Meditation. San Francisco: Weiser.

Sayadaw U Indaka (Translated by Ven Ariya Nani). (2004). Metta: The Practice of Loving-Kindness as the Foundation for Insight Meditation Practice. Malaysia: Private Circulation.

Sayadaw U Pandita. (1993). In This Very Life: The Liberation Teachings of the Buddha. Boston: Wisdom.

*Gunaratana, H. (2002). Mindfulness in Plain English. Boston: Wisdom.

*Gunaratana, H. (2009). Beyond Mindfulness in Plain English: An Introductory guide to Deeper States of Meditation. Boston: Wisdom.

Mindfulness-Based Interventions

Cayoun, B.(2011).Mindfulness-integrated CBT: Principles and Practice. West Sussex : Wiley.

Crane, R. (2009). Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy: Distinctive Features. New York: Routledge.

Didonna, F. (2009). Clinical Handbook of Mindfulness. New York: Springer.

Germer, C.K. (2009). The Mindful Path to Self-Compassion: Freeing Yourself from Destructive Thoughts and Emotions. New York: Guilford.

Garner-Fix, J. (2009). The Mindfulness Solution to Pain: Step-by-Step Techniques for Chronic Pain Management. Oakland: New Harbinger.

Germer, C.K., Siegel, R.D. & Fulton, P.R. (Ed.) (2005). Mindfulness and Psychotherapy. New York: Guilford.

*Kabat-Zinn, J. (1990). Full Catastrophe Living: The Program of the Stress Reduction Clinic at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. New York: Dell.

Kabat-Zinn, J. (2005). Coming to Our Senses: Healing Ourselves and the World Through Mindfulness. London: Piatkus.

Mace, C. (2007). Mindfulness and Mental Health: Therapy, Theory and Science. London: Routledge.

McCown, D., Reibel, D., Micozzi, M.S. (2013). Teaching Mindfulness: A Practical Guide for Clinicians and Educators. New York: Springer.

Roemer, L., Orsillo, S.M. (2008). Mindfulness- and Acceptance-Based Behavioral Therapies in Practice. New York: Guilford.

Santorelli, S. (1999). Heal Thy Self - Lessons on Mindfulness in Medicine. New York: Bell Tower.

Schoeberlein, D. (2009). Mindful Teaching and Teaching Mindfulness: A Guide for Anyone Who Teaches Anything. Boston: Wisdom.

*Segal, Z. V., Williams, J. M. G., & Teasdale, J. D. (2002). Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Depression - A New Approach to Preventing Relapse. New York: Guilford.

Thich Nhat Hanh (2001). Anger: Wisdom for Cooling the Flames. New York: Riverhead.

Walser, R.D., Westrup, D. (2009). The Mindful Couple: How Acceptance and Mindfulness Can Lead You to the Love You Want. Oakland: New Harbinger.

*Williams, M., Teasdale, J., Segal, Z., Kabat-Zinn, J. (2007). The Mindful Way Through Depression: Freeing Yourself with Chronic Unhappiness (with Audio CD). New York: Guilford.

*Williams, M., Penman, D. (2011). Mindfulness: A Practical Guide To Finding Peace In A Frantic World. London: Piatkus.

Wilson, K. G. (2009). Mindfulness for Two: An Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Approach to Mindfulness in Psychotherapy. Oakland: New Harbinger.

*Highly Recommended

BSTC6044

History of Chinese Buddhism
Lecturer

Ven. Dr. Guang Xing

Tel: 3917-5040

Email: guangxin@hku.hk

Schedule: 2nd Semester; Monday 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.

Class Venue: CPD-2.16, 2/F, Centennial Campus
Course Description:
This course examines the major events and thoughts in the history of Chinese Buddhism with a particular emphasis on the establishment of Chinese Buddhist Schools. A major aim is to show how Buddhism has been gradually and successfully incorporated into and became one of the three pillars of Chinese thought and culture. The important Chinese Buddhist masters will also be examined against their historical background to show their contribution to the development of Chinese Buddhism.
Objectives
Students are expected to get familiar with the basic historical events, major schools of thoughts and important personages together with their contribution to development of Chinese Buddhism.
Examination and Requirements
Students are required to read the relevant material at least one paper before the lecture so that he can participate in discussion. The final examination is based on two essays, one presentation and lecture participation


  1. 40 % short essay with 1500 words (dead line for its submission is 16 March).
  2. 50% long essay with 3,000 words (dead line for its submission is 18 May).


  3. 10 % lecture attendance.

Please include your email address when you submit your essays, electronic version is sufficient.
Course Outline (tentative)
Lecture 1:

Topic: A Survey of Chinese Buddhism

Reading: Zurcher, Buddhist Conquest of China: pp.1-17.

Wright, Arthur F. 1957. “Buddhism and Chinese Culture: Phases of Interaction” The Journal of Asian Studies, Vol. 17, No.1, 17-42.

中村元著,《中國佛教發展史》(上), 第一章: 佛教東傳中國與其傳衍經過.
Lecture 2:

Topic: Introduction of Buddhism into China

Reading: Ch’en, pp.21-53; Zurcher, pp.18-80.

潘桂明, 董群, 麻天祥,《歷史巻》, 第一章: 兩漢三國佛教,第二章: 西晉佛教。

中村元著,《中國佛教發展史》(上), 第二章: 佛教在漢魏西晉三朝的發展。
Holiday: Chinese New Year Break Jan 31-Feb 6
Lecture 3:

Topic: Buddhism under Eastern Jin

Reading: Ch’en, pp.57-120; 94-103; Zurcher, pp.81-320.

潘桂明, 董群, 麻天祥,《歷史巻》:第三章: 東晉十六國佛教。

中村元著,《中國佛教發展史》(上), 第三章: 佛教在華北胡族國家建立的經過, 第四章: 佛教於江南漢族國家的發展。
Lecture 4:

Topic: Buddhism under Southern and Northern dynasty (I) Historical

Reading: Ch’en, pp.121-183; Zurcher, pp.204-239.

潘桂明, 董群, 麻天祥,《歷史巻》:第四章: 南北朝佛教。

中村元著,《中國佛教發展史》(上), 第五章: 華北異民族統治下的佛教。

Lecture 5:

Topic: Buddhism under Southern and Northern dynasties (II) Thought

Reading: Ch’en, pp.184-212; Zurcher, pp.81-159.

潘桂明,《宗派卷》: 第二章: 南北朝的師說學派.


Lecture 6:

Topic: Buddhism under Sui and Tang: Historical

Reading: Ch’en, pp.213-296.

潘桂明, 董群, 麻天祥,《歷史巻》:第五章: 隋唐佛教。

中村元著,《中國佛教發展史》(上), 第六章: 隋唐的統一, 第七章: 中國佛教的形成, 第八章: 隋唐的中國佛教。
Reading Week March 10-16
Lecture 7:

Topic: Buddhism under Sui and Tang: Schools (I) Tiantai, Sanlun and Sanjie

Reading: Ch’en, pp.297-325.

Takakusu, The Essentials of Buddhist Philosophy, Chapters IX: The Tendai (Tiantai) School, VII: The Sanron (Sanlun) School,

潘桂明,《宗派卷》: 第三章:止觀並重的天臺宗, 第四章: 重思辡的三論宗, 第四章: 普信普敬的三階教
Lecture 8:

Topic: Buddhism under Sui and Tang: Schools (II) Yogacara, Huayan, Vinaya and Tantrayana

Reading: Ch’en, pp.325- 364.

Takakusu, The Essentials of Buddhist Philosophy, Chapters VI: The Hosso (Fa-xiang) School, VIII: The Kegon (Huayan) School, X: The Shingon (Zhenyen) School.

潘桂明,《宗派卷》: 第六章: 嚴肅戒律的律宗, 第七章:萬法唯識的法相唯識宗, 第八章:圓融無礙的華嚴宗, 第九章: 融會雜糅的密宗

Lecture 9:

Topic: Buddhism under Sui and Tang: Schools (III) Chan and Pure Land

Reading: Takakusu, The Essentials of Buddhist Philosophy, Chapters XI: The Zen (Chan) School, XII: The Jodo (Jingtu) School.

潘桂明,《宗派卷》: 第十章: 自信自力的禪宗, 第十一章: 他力往生的淨土宗.


Lecture 10:

Topic: Buddhism under Song: The syncretism of Chinese Buddhism

Reading: Ch’en, pp.389-408.

潘桂明, 董群, 麻天祥,《歷史巻》, 第六章: 五代佛教, 第七章: 宋代佛教; 中村元著,《中國佛教發展史》(中), 第一章: 唐宋交替之際的佛教, 第二章: 佛教的復興, 第一章: 禪宗的隆盛與護法活動.


Lecture 11:

Topic: Buddhism after Song: The syncretism of Chinese Buddhism

Reading: Ch’en, pp.409-433.

潘桂明, 董群, 麻天祥,《歷史巻》, 第八章: 遼金元佛教, 中村元著,《中國佛教發展史》(中), 第六章: 庶民的佛教


Easter Holiday April 21
Lecture 12:

Topic: Buddhism in Modern China

Reading: Ch’en, pp.455-470.

潘桂明, 董群, 麻天祥,《歷史巻》, 第十一章:楊仁山與近恣佛教,第十二章寺僧的入世轉向與居士佛教的勃興。



Pittman, Don A. Towards a Modern Chinese Buddhism: Taixu’s Reforms. Hanululu: The University of Hawaii Press. 2001.

Suggested topics for essay



  1. Discuss the characteristics of Chinese Buddhism during the first phase (from the Eastern Han to the end of the Western Jin)

  2. Discuss the conflict caused by “The Scripture of Laozi’s Conversion of the Barbarians” (老子化胡).

  3. Assess Daoan’s contribution to Chinese Buddhism.

  4. Discuss Huiyuan’s contribution to Chinese Buddhism.

  5. Discuss the social conflict of “Monks should not pay respect to kings.”

  6. Examine the causes for the rapid development of Buddhism in Southern and Northern dynasties.

  7. Discuss Jizang’s contribution to Sanlun School.

  8. Discuss Zhiyi’s role and contribution to Tiantai School.

  9. Discuss Huineng’s contribution to Chan Buddhism and examine why his southern branch became so influential?

  10. Discuss Fazang and Huayan thought.

  11. Examine Xuanzang’s contribution to Chinese Buddhism.

  12. Discuss Tanluan’s contribution to Pure Land School.

  13. Zhanran contributed to the revival of Tiantai School in Tang dynasty, Discuss.

  14. Discuss why authentic Buddhists considered Sanjie or Three Stages School a heretic.

  15. Discuss Kuiji’s contribution to Faxian or Yogacara School in China.

  16. Discuss briefly the three tantric masters’ contribution to Tantrayana School in China.

  17. Discuss the syncretism of Buddhism during Song dynasty.

  18. Buddhism declined after Tang dynasty. Discuss the causes.

  19. Examine the causes of the conflict between Buddhism and Daoism in the history of Chinese Buddhism.

  20. Discuss the conflict between Buddhism and Confucianism with a focus on filial piety.

  21. Examine the causes of the four persecutions of Buddhism in Chinese history.
  22. Examine the causes of one of the four persecutions of Buddhism in Chinese history.

  23. Examine the roles played by the translators in Chinese Buddhism.

  24. Examine the Buddhist solution to the Confucian criticism of Buddhist monks being unfilial.

  25. Discuss Master Taixu’s contribution to modern Chinese Buddhism.

  26. Examine the revival of Chinese Buddhism at modern age.




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