Miami south dade historic buildings



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MIAMI – SOUTH DADE HISTORIC BUILDINGS






  • Built along Key Biscayne in 1891, this pioneer house built by Commodore Ralph Munroe is oldest house in Dade County still situated in its original location. The house is surrounded by a lush garden of native trees and plants in a hardwood hammock, one of the last examples left of Miami’s original landscape. The house tells the story of early fishing and farming on the Florida frontier.



  • 3485 Main Highway, Coconut Grove

http://www.floridastateparks.org/thebarnacle

The Pan American Seaplane Base in Coconut Grove, Florida,

Opened in 1931, this waterfront base was the birthplace of Pan-Am airplanes, but prior to that it was one of the first navy aviation training centers in World War I. The first commercial fliers used the facility.

In 1930, Pan American Airways (Pan Am), symbolized by eagles and globes, acquired the New York-Rio-Buenos Aires Airline which flew twin-engine Commodore flying boats between Miami and Buenos Aires. The former naval air base at Dinner Key was selected by Pan Am as the base for its inter-American operations with the inaugural flight from Dinner Key to Panama taking place on December 1, 1930. The lack of good landing spots in Latin American made the seaplane a viable carrier until 1940.

Miami Senior High is the oldest high school in Dade County since it opened its doors in 1903. The present building opened in 1928, two years after the Great 1926 Hurricane ruined its construction The school was almost always overcrowded, but alumni kept the buiklding modernized. Today’s school of 3,000 students is 90% Hispanic for Miami High is part of the Little Havana scene.


2450 SW 1st St
Miami, Florida, 33135



Villa Woodbine
2167 S Bayshore Drive
Year Built: 1931
Architect/Builder: Walter C. DeGarmo/The St. John Co., Inc.
Date Designated: 1988

On Biscayne Bay on a high bluff, Villa Woodbine is an early twentieth century estates remaining in Coconut Grove. This outstanding Mediterranean Revival style house was work. Charles S. Boyd, founder of the Appleton Paper Company in Wisconsin, commissioned the house as a winter home and named the house after a grade of paper called woodbine enamel.



VILLA WOODBINE COURTYARD

The building is the site of many weddings and events.

Trapp Homestead

From Wikipedia,

The Trapp Homestead (also known as the Caleb Trapp House and the Trapp Estate) is a historic home in the Coconut Grove section of the City of Miami, Florida, United States. It is located at 2521 South Bayshore Drive. On November 10, 1994, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. The home was constructed out of Oolitic Lime quarried out of the Silver Bluff of the property in 1887 by Caleb Trapp (aged 70, at the time) and his son, Harlan. During construction, the Trapps lived on a thatched hut at the front of the property. The Property is believed to be the oldest-standing masonry home in Miami-Dade County, Florida. The Estate's construction pre-dates the incorporation of the City of Miami.

The Estate was particularly notable at the time because it was one of the few stone structures in Miami-Dade County (then called only Dade County), as nearly all structures in the area were built of wood at that time.

Originally, the property consisted of approximately 2.5 acres (10,000 m2) overlooking Biscayne Bay before what is now called South Bayshore Drive was built (at the time of the road's construction, it was known as Rhodes Boulevard and was named for Mrs. Trapp's family, which had previously settled in the area and received a 400-acre (1.6 km2) land grant). Subsequently, Main Street, which later was renamed Tigertail Avenue was constructed along property's Northern Boundary.

The Trapp family pioneered the famed "Trapp Avocado" and sold them by boat to early Miami area hotels. They also grew and milled Coontie Starch sold for local use. A road in Coconut Grove located just a few blocks away is named Trapp Avenue in honor of the Trapp family. The Trapps were significant community leaders in the area and Mr. Trapp was one of the 8 founding members of the Coconut Grove Yacht Club (which continues to operate) located across South Bayshore Drive from the estate. Mrs. Trapp is believed to have given at the Estate the first teachers' test for the local public school. Mrs. Trapp was also one of the first Public School Teachers in the area.

In the years that followed, numerous mansions were constructed along Rhodes Boulevard/South Bayshore Drive and the street became notable in Miami for its expensive and substantial homes cast on top of the Silver Bluff overlooking Biscayne Bay.

Fire Station No. 4

1000 S Miami Ave


Miami, FL 33131

Fire Station No. 4 was built in 1922 in the popular Mediterranean Revival style of the Era. Architect H. Hasting Mundy’s two-story hipped roof design with its arcaded porch, stucco walls, and balconies is a real classic of the design.

FIREHOUSE 4

GEORGE NOLAN HOUSE

This 3-story Neo-Classical villa at 1548 Brickell Avenue, one block from the Bay, is one of the last Boom Time mansions built on Miami’s first Millionaire Road. Designed by J. C. Gault for just $28,000, the building was a showplace in the 1920’s with its massive Corinthian portico.

GULF SOUTHLAND SERVICE STATION

This 1938 Art Deco service station at 1700 SW 22nd (Coral Way) is a landmark design by noted commercial architect Russell Pencoast although the actual architects were Lester Avery and Curtis Haley. Wonderful mix of pitched and gable roof lines.


Dr. James M. Jackson Office

Dr Jackson’s little building surrounded by the skyscapers of Brickkel Place was the office of pioneer physician who started Jackson Hospital. His family produced a number of notable surgeons and civic leaders






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