Middle school english instruction pre-test: reading

:)


Download 1.03 Mb.
Date11.06.2018
Size1.03 Mb.



MIDDLE SCHOOL ENGLISH INSTRUCTION PRE-TEST: READING


Directions: Read the article on pp. 1-2 and answer the questions that follow.

Babe Didrikson, Champion Athlete




1 The neighborhood boys who played baseball with Mildred Didrikson gave her a nickname. Because she batted so well, they called her “Babe” after the famous baseball player Babe Ruth. Didrikson did not become famous for hitting home runs. H

er athletic achievements did, however, help her set records in several other sports.


2 Mildred Ella Didrikson was born in Texas on June 26, 1911. Her parents had moved to America from Norway. Her father worked as a seaman and carpenter. In the family backyard he built gymnastic equipment for his seven children. Both parents encouraged their children to develop their athletic skills.


3 Babe played basketball for Beaumont High School’s Miss Royal Purple team. She was only five feet five inches tall, yet her height did not hold her back. Babe shot well, and she ran fast. Her team never lost a game while she played with them.
4 Next, Babe played for a women’s basketball team called the Golden Cyclones. Led by

Babe, they made it to the finals twice. In 1931 they won the national title. While playing for this team, Babe earned All-American honors—three years in a row!

5 Soon Babe was introduced to track and field. At her first track meet, Babe took first place in four events. In 1932 she entered the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) Championship, a national track and field meet. Babe was a one-person team! Within three hours she competed in eight different events and won five of them. In addition, she set several new records. These were in the javelin throw, high jump, baseball throw, and hurdle race. Babe won the championship title all by herself. She earned 30 points. The second place team had 22 points. They also had 22 athletes!

6 In the 1932 Olympics, women were allowed to enter no more than three events. Babe took part, winning two gold medals. She also broke two world records. She threw the javelin 143 feet 4 inches. She ran the 80-meter hurdle race in 11.7 seconds. In the high jump, Babe tied the world record with another athlete. They both jumped 5 feet 51/4 inches. However, Babe jumped with her head going over the bar first. The judges considered this a foul. Because of this, Babe was given the silver medal for the high jump. Today there are no rules against this type of jump.
7 The following year, Babe began taking golf lessons. She could drive the ball 250 yards.

Babe won the second golf tournament in which she played. In 1946 and 1947 Babe had a winning streak that included seventeen tournaments in a row. Altogether Babe won fifty-five tournaments. She also helped establish the Ladies Professional Golf Association.


8 Babe played basketball and golf and participated in track. She played tennis, volleyball, baseball, and handball. She could bowl, dive, skate, and swim. In 1950 Babe Didrikson’s exceptional athletic abilities earned her a one-of-a-kind honor. Babe was voted and named “the Woman Athlete of the Half-Century.”

_____________________________________________________________




1 Read these sentences from paragraph 2.


In the family backyard he built gymnastic equipment for his seven children. Both parents encouraged their children to develop their athletic skills.

In which word does -ic have the same meaning as it does in gymnastic and athletic?
A attic

B topic

C artistic

D panic

2 In paragraph 8, what does the word exceptional mean?

A remarkable

B helpful

C imaginary

D average

3 How did Babe overcome her lack of height in basketball?
A She tried to win national awards.

B She played as a one-person team.

C She shot well and ran fast.

D She chose to play other sports.

4 Babe’s victory in the AAU Championship was especially amazing because she
A was the shortest athlete there

B played against both men and women

C won alone against a team of twenty-two

D had never played golf before


5 The information given in paragraphs 5 and 6 shows that Babe —
A enjoyed running most of all

B was the only athlete in her family

C refused to have any teammates

D was very successful in the 1930s

6 In the 1932 Olympics, Babe broke the world record in —
A high diving and bowling

B the javelin throw and the hurdle race

C the high jump and the baseball throw

D gymnastics and tennis

7 When two high jumpers reached the same height, Babe was given the

second-place award because —
A she had already won two first-place awards

B the other athlete introduced an interesting new style

C the other athlete claimed that Babe had bumped her

D she jumped in a way that was not yet allowed

8 In the late 1940s, Babe helped establish an association for women who —

A enjoyed swimming

B ran in races

C played basketball

D played golf
9 Which question is answered in the article’s last paragraph?
A In which sports did Babe participate?

B How many awards were given to Babe?

C What was Babe’s favorite sport?

D How long did Babe live?
10 If the author added a sentence at the end of paragraph 8, which of these

would fit best?
A Someone who might have been proud of her was Babe Ruth, a famous baseball

player.


B The story begins in Texas, where many children, including Babe, played baseball.

C Babe was a shining example for anyone who sets and achieves goals.

D Only one woman athlete, Babe, deserved to win the award.
11 What was the author’s main purpose in writing this article?
A Informing readers about an amazing sports figure

B Entertaining readers with a lively story about swimming, running, and other

activities



C Amusing readers with funny stories about a real person who lived long ago

D Listing facts and details for the reader to remember

12 Read this sentence from paragraph 2.

Mildred Ella Didrikson was born in Texas on June 26, 1911.

This sentence establishes the passage as —
A folk tale

B biography

C autobiography

D historical fiction

13 To find the names of other award-winning female athletes in 1930, a student

would look in —
A an almanac

B a thesaurus


C a dictionary

D an atlas

Directions: Read the flier about the contest and answer the questions that follow.
DESIGN-A-LOGO CONTEST

We need a logo–a graphic image–that will be the perfect symbol of our great new Wheelsville Skate Park. We would like those of you who are counting the days until the grand opening to design an appropriate logo that can be used on stationery, business cards, fliers, brochures, posters, and T-shirts. An appropriate, well-designed logo will provide an opportunity for young artists to receive recognition as well as great prizes. If you are interested, here are the things you need to know:




LOGO REQUIREMENTS

• Design must be original and distinctive.

• Design can include no more than two colors in addition to black and white.

• Artwork should be reproducible at various sizes from business cards to posters.

• The words “Wheelsville Skate Park” must appear in the logo.
SUBMISSION DETAILS

• Contestants are required to be 18 years old or younger on May 15.

• There is no limit to the number of submissions.

• Logo should be submitted on 8 1/2 x 11 paper. Do not fold.

• Name and address of designer must appear on the back of the logo design.

• Contestants need to include a one-page written explanation describing the key features of the design.

• All submissions become the property of Wheelsville Skate Park. None will be returned.

DEADLINE

• Mail entries will be accepted between April 10 and May 15. Entries must be postmarked no later than May 15.

• Electronic submissions must be transmitted no later than May 15.

• Winning design will be posted on our website at www.wheelsville.skatepark.com on May 20,

three weeks before the grand opening celebration.

PRIZES

First Prize: Digital camera, one-year pass to Wheelsville Skate Park, and two T-shirts bearing the prize-winning logo

Second Prize: Six-month pass to Wheelsville Skate Park and a T-shirt with the prize-winning logo

Honorable Mention: One free ticket to Wheelsville Skate Park and a T-shirt with the prize-winning logo to two contestants from grades K–5, two contestants from grades 6–8, and two

contestants from grades 9–12
JUDGES

• The panel of judges is made up of a graphic designer, two technology teachers, four local skaters, and three members of Wheelsville Skate Park Board of Directors. All judges’ decisions are final.


MAIL ENTRY FORMS AND DESIGNS TO:

Wheelsville Skate Park Logo Contest

Riverside Recreation Center

1295 New Rockford Hwy.

Riverside, VA 23226


ELECTRONIC SUBMISSIONS of no more than 2 MB may be sent to skateman4x@comlink.com by May 15. Files should be .jpg, .gif, .png, .pict, or Photoshop files.


14 In the introduction, the phrase “counting the days” suggests a feeling of —
A nervousness

B amusement

C uncertainty

D excitement
15 Under “Deadline,” the word transmitted could best be replaced with —
A sent

B drawn

C created

D found
16 Based on the flier, which file type is not acceptable for submission?
A .jpg

B .png

C .pict

D .bmp

17 Read this additional information for the flier.

All contestants will receive a certificate



of achievement.




This information would best fit under which of the following headings?
A Logo Requirements

B Submission Details

C Deadline

D Prizes
18 This flier tries to encourage readers to enter the contest by —
A explaining the rules

B relating interesting details

C offering prizes

D showing sample logos
19 How will winners be announced?
A By mail

B By telephone

C On the radio

D On the Internet
20 Which question is answered in the introduction?
F Who are the judges?

G What prizes are offered?

H Who needs a logo?

J When is the contest over?



Directions: Read the poem on pp. 8-9 and answer the questions that follow.
Ups and Downs
In the dog days of August, the sun beats a slow drum

On hours dry as feathers, but we don’t mind.

We loll at the beach, tanned and sweaty,

Cooled by crystal waters, under skies blue

5 And perfect as childhood. But the river minds.

He gives himself up, drop by drop, lower, lower,

Sinks into himself, sad and sullen,

And scared, I think, of dying: slower, slower.

I smell the muddy reeds, see logs we’ve never seen.

10 Rocks appear like nightmares in August noons.

September brings thunder, lightning, downpour

Days of torrents, drizzles, sheets, and showers.

The end of the dock sinks as the thirsty river

Drinks and guzzles, sloshing, slobbering,

15 Rushing. The crooked snake nuzzles the banks,

Hugs the bends he’s whittled over long years.

He’s giddy—tumbling, somersaulting, rock vaulting!

We read books, tie flies, play games, bake pies

As the golden leaves are pelted off their branches,

20 And the stiff brown moss turns green and lush again.

October’s Indian summer is dry. Crackling leaves,

Snapping branches. No campfires allowed. The river

Dwindles, shrinks. The bogs dry up to stinky stones

Like white bones: where do the frogs go? The river

25 Flattens, thins, fish huddle in its muddy rims.

Forest fires in Canada! One day we wake to hazy smoke,

Shudder, watch our river choke. We watch the logs

And rocks poke their heads again, grinning

Cackling: Come and get us! The weather station

30 Says drought. Drought. The beavers wait.


The paper says it’s snowing in The Country, what if . . .

If the river freezes low, what will the beavers do?

But November brings relief, for just as the last red leaf

Drops, the skies open and cry! Autumn deluge,

35 River refuge. We hear it on the roof—all night—

All day—We hear the river praising rain! Again, it

Drinks its fill, rises, rises, swells, surprises.

As we pull out the docks, in our hip-waders,

The cold river is high and mighty, it rushes round

40 Our thighs and screams: AAHHEEE! Let winter come!



R8UPS505
21 The first line of “Ups and Downs” is an example of —
A personification _

B simile

C metaphor

D onomatopoeia

22 Why does the speaker “see logs we’ve never seen” (line 9)?
A Beavers are busy cutting logs to build dams.

B New trees are falling into the river.

C The river is drying up and exposing the logs. _

D People have thrown odd things into the river.

23 What does the description in line 13 mean?
A The dock is old and is sinking into the river.

B The dock is lower at one end than the other.

C The river is rising higher. _

D The river is eating the dock away.

24 Look at the thesaurus entry.


vault: (v.) jerk, leap, start, rise



If the author wanted to replace the word vaulting in line 17, which would be the most precise word to use from the thesaurus entry?
A jerking

B rising

C starting

D leaping _

SESSION: 26 PAGE: 9 7/17/0LOGIN IS: @sunultra1/raid/CLS_tpc/GRP_virginia/JOB_03-olptg8/ R803C528


25 The poet uses the term “high and mighty” in line 39 to show that the

river is —
A very inviting

B threatening to leave its banks

C more powerful than people

D strong again _





26 Who is the speaker in this poem?
A A person who lives near a river _

B Different people at different times of the year

C The river that needs water

D A beaver that lives near the river

27 Which is a simile expressed in this poem?
A “We read books . . .”

B “September brings thunder . . .”

C “Rocks appear like nightmares . . .” _

D“As we pull out . . .”

28 Which description from the poem best creates a clear, visual image of the

weather in September?
A “Drinks and guzzles, sloshing, slobbering . . .”

B “Days of torrents, drizzles, sheets, and showers.” _


C “And the stiff brown moss turns green and lush again.”

D “As the golden leaves are pelted off their branches . . .”
Directions: Read the letter and answer the questions that follow.
Letter to the Editor
Dear Editor,
1 Brockingham is run by people who are more interested in tourists than its residents. The problem is that the people running the government, and nearly everything else in Brockingham, refuse to accept new ideas. By banning all fast-food restaurants and discount stores, they take away all the places kids can afford to shop.
2 These people forget that when they were young, they could go to the South Street Soda Fountain and get an ice-cream soda for 25 cents. Today you can’t find an ice-cream soda anywhere in Brockingham for less than $2! Why? Because the only places selling ice cream in Brockingham are Danker & Phillips, de Chambord, and The Emporium Restaurant. Have you tried buying a hamburger in one of those places? You can get an Emporium Deluxe with lettuce, tomato, cheese, and a pickle for a mere $6.98! Where can kids go for a snack?
3 There is not a single restaurant in Brockingham where a family of four can eat dinner for less than $100. Add a 15% tip and sales tax and you have spent nearly $125 to eat a meal you could prepare at home for about $12. Have you noticed that Brockingham families never dine in Brockingham? But take a look at Parkersburg on a Friday night. It seems as if you’re walking down a Brockingham High corridor when you walk down South Main Street in Parkersburg.

4 Fast-food restaurants are also a good place for school kids to get an after-school job. Fast-food restaurants are busiest during the early supper hours when students are able to work, whereas the fancy food restaurants cater to late-night diners.Working in one of these establishments requires working shifts that are too late for most students.

5 The City Council claims that local merchants, rather than national chains, should benefit from the tourist business. I agree that it is important to support local businesses, but I think the fast-food restaurants would encourage more people to shop in Brockingham. As it is now, most tourists who come to Brockingham stop to eat at low-cost, convenient places in Southport or Regis Landing. How does that help Brockingham food establishments? Many people who stay overnight in Brockingham drive 25 miles to Parkersburg for breakfast at Jiffy Burger. That place is packed every weekend morning. Those profits could be kept in Brockingham.
6 Another thing that disturbs me is that we must travel 25 miles to the nearest discount store. If I need a tire for my bike, I have a choice of buying one at Surf and Peddle Sport Shop for $15 or driving to Parkersburg Discount Center where I can buy the same kind of tire for $9. When I am in Parkersburg, Dad always fills up the tank of the car, since the same brand of gas is at least 8 cents cheaper there than in Brockingham. Again, I think the ban on all food chains and discount houses is counterproductive for our city.
Wes Woodrow
Wes Woodrow
9th-Grade Student at Brockingham High School

29 In paragraph 4 of the letter, the word cater means —
A give orders

B show preference _

C offer work

D make excuses
30 In paragraph 6 of the letter, the word counterproductive means —
A cheap, not expensive

B surprising, not expected

C harmful, not helpful _

D doubtful, not sure

31 Information in which paragraph of the letter supports the idea that Wes


Woodrow is practical with his own money?
A 3

B 4

C 5

D 6 _
32 One way the writer of this letter tries to convince the reader is by —
A explaining that someone has to drive him to Parkersburg

B telling the names of towns near Brockingham

C suggesting that many businessmen have the same opinion

D giving specific examples of the high costs in Brockingham _
33 Which statement from the letter best supports the idea that Wes Woodrow’s

family has probably lived in Brockingham for a long time?
A Another thing that disturbs me is that we must travel 25 miles to the nearest

discount store.



B These people forget that when they were young, they could go to the South Street

Soda Fountain and get an ice-cream soda for 25 cents. _



C The problem is that the people running the government, and nearly everything

else in Brockingham, refuse to accept new ideas.



D You can get an Emporium Deluxe with lettuce, tomato, cheese, and a pickle for

a mere $6.98!


34 Information in this letter suggests that the residents of Brockingham spend a lot of time —
A working at local restaurants

B dining with friends at the Emporium

C writing letters to the City Council

D shopping in Parkersburg _
35 Which is an opinion expressed in the letter?
A It seems as if you’re walking down a Brockingham High corridor when you walk down South Main Street in Parkersburg. _

B Most of these places have shifts that accommodate a student’s schedule.

C Today you can’t find an ice-cream soda anywhere in Brockingham for less than $2.


D When we are in Parkersburg, my dad always fills up the tank of the car.
36 As a result of reading this letter in the newspaper, other people are most likely to —
A demand that the newspaper investigate the concern

B write letters of support or opposition _

C hire high school students to do work after school

D purchase goods from local businesses

SESSION: 41 PAGE: 17 11/9/101 12:53 LOGIN IS-



Read the selection on pp. 16-17 and answer the questions that follow.

Murphy

from “Dogs That Have Known Me”

How I Got to Be Perfect

by Jean Kerr


1 The dog that gave us the most trouble was a beagle named Murphy. As far as I’m concerned, the first thing he did wrong was to turn into a beagle. I had seen him bounding around on the other side of a pet-shop window, and I went in and asked the man, “How much is that adorable fox terrier in the window?”

Did he say, “That adorable fox terrier is a beagle”? No, he said, “Ten dollars, lady.” Now, I don’t mean to say one word against beagles. They have rights just like other people. But it is a bit of a shock when you bring home a small ball of fluff in a shoebox, and three weeks later it’s as long as the sofa.

2 Murphy was the first dog I ever trained personally, and I was delighted at the enthusiasm with which he took to the newspaper. It was sometime later that we discovered, to our horror, that—like so many dogs—he had grasped the letter but not the spirit of the thing. Until the very end of his days he felt a real sense of obligation whenever he saw a newspaper—any newspaper—and it didn’t matter where it was. I can’t bring myself to go into the details, except to mention that we were finally compelled to keep all the papers in the bottom of the icebox.

3 He had another habit that used to leave us open to a certain amount of criticism from our friends who were not dogophiles. He never climbed up on beds or chairs or sofas. But he always sat on top of the piano. In the beginning we used to try to pull him off of there. But after a few noisy scuffles in which he knocked a picture off the wall, scratched the piano, and smashed a lamp, we just gave in—only to discover that, left to his own devices, he hopped up and down as delicately as a ballet dancer.
4 It’s not just our own dogs that bother me. The dogs I meet at parties are even worse. I don’t know what I’ve got that attracts them; it just doesn’t bear thought. My husband swears I rub chopped meat on my ankles. But at every party it’s the same thing. I am sitting with a group in front of the fire when all of a sudden the large mutt of the host appears in the archway. Then, without a single bark of warning, he hurls himself upon me. He settles down peacefully on my lap. I blow out such quantities of hair as I haven’t swallowed and glance at my host, expecting to be rescued. He murmurs, “Isn’t that wonderful? You know, Brucie is usually so distant with strangers.”

5 At a dinner party last week, after I had been mugged by a large sheepdog, I announced quite piteously, “Oh dear, he seems to have swallowed one of my earrings.” The hostess looked really distressed for a moment, until she examined the remaining earring. Then she said, “Oh, I think it will be all right. It’s small and round.”


6 Nowadays if I go anywhere I just ask if they have a dog. If they do, I say, “Maybe I’d better keep away from him—I have this bad allergy.” This does not really charm the lady of the house. In fact, she behaves rather as though she’d just discovered that I was back in analysis for my kleptomania. But it is safer. It really is.
____________________________________________________________

37 Read this sentence from paragraph 1 of the essay.


But it is a bit of a shock when you bring home a small ball of fluff in a shoebox, and three weeks later it’s as long as the sofa.


The author uses a hyperbole to illustrate that the dog grew—
A surprisingly affectionate

B comfortable in the house

C too large to fit on a couch

D larger than expected


38 Which excerpt reveals the author’s inability to train Murphy?
A I had seen him bounding around on the other side of a pet-shop window . . .

B . . . we were finally compelled to keep all the papers in the bottom of the icebox.

C He never climbed up on beds or chairs . . .


  1. D . . . all of a sudden the large mutt of the host appears . . .


39 In the second paragraph, the author implies that Murphy—
A Likes to tear up newspapers

B Seems almost intelligent enough to read the newspaper

C Is frightened of newspapers

D Feels it is his duty to urinate on all newspapers


40 In paragraph 6, why does the author avoid contact with dogs?
A Exposure to dogs causes her to sneeze.

B Dogs cause mishaps to occur.

C Hosts insist on saving her from their dogs.

D She dislikes most types of dogs.

Read the story on pp. 17-19 and answer the questions that follow.

THE GOLDEN WINDOWS

1 ALL day long the little boy had worked hard, in field and barn and shed, for his people were poor farmers, and could not pay a workman; but at sunset there came an hour that was all his own, for his father had given it to him. Then the boy would go up to the top of a hill and look across at another hill that rose some miles away. On this far hill stood a house with windows of clear gold and diamonds. They shone and blazed so that it made the boy wink to look at them: but after a while the people in the house put up shutters, as it seemed, and then it looked like any common farm house. The boy supposed they did this because it was supper-time; and then he would go into the house and have his supper of bread and milk, and so to bed.

2 One day the boy's father called him and said: "You have been a good boy, and have earned a holiday. Take this day for your own; but remember that God gave it, and try to learn some good thing."
3 The boy thanked his father and kissed his mother; then he put a piece of bread in his pocket, and started off to find the house with the golden windows. It was pleasant walking. His bare feet made marks in the white dust, and when he looked back, the footprints seemed to be following him, and making company for him. His shadow, too, kept beside him, and would dance or run with him as he pleased; so it was very cheerful.
4 By and by he felt hungry; and he sat down by a brown brook that ran through the alder hedge by the roadside, and ate his bread, and drank the clear water. Then he scattered the crumbs for the birds, as his mother had taught him to do, and went on his way.
5 After a long time he came to a high green hill; and when he had climbed the hill, there was the house on the top; but it seemed that the shutters were up, for he could not see the golden windows. He came up to the house, and then he could well have wept, for the windows were of clear glass, like any others, and there was no gold anywhere about them.
6 A woman came to the door, and looked kindly at the boy, and asked him what he wanted.

"I saw the golden windows from our hilltop," he said, "and I came to see them, but now they are only glass."


7 The woman shook her head and laughed. "We are poor farming people," she said, "and are not likely to have gold about our windows; but glass is better to see through."

8 She bade the boy sit down on the broad stone step at the door, and brought him a cup of milk and a cake, and bade him rest; then she called her daughter, a child of his own age, and nodded kindly at the two, and went back to her work.

9 The little girl was barefooted like himself, and wore a brown cotton gown, but her hair was golden like the windows he had seen, and her eyes were blue like the sky at noon. She led the boy about the farm, and showed him her black calf with the white star on its forehead, and he told her about his own at home, which was red like a chestnut, with four white feet. Then when they had eaten an apple together, and so had become friends, the boy asked her about the golden windows. The little girl nodded, and said she knew all about them, only he had mistaken the house.
10 "You have come quite the wrong way!" she said. "Come with me, and I will show you the house with the golden windows, and then you will see for yourself." They went to a knoll that rose behind the farmhouse, and as they went the little girl told him that the golden windows could only be seen at a certain hour, about sunset.
11 When they reached the top of the knoll, the girl turned and pointed; and there on a hill far away stood a house with windows of clear gold and diamond, just as he had seen them. And when they looked again, the boy saw that it was his own home.
12 Then he told the little girl that he must go; and he gave her his best pebble, the white one with the red band, that he had carried for a year in his pocket; and she gave him three horse-chestnuts, one red like satin, one spotted, and one white like milk. He kissed her, and promised to come again, but he did not tell her what he had learned; and so he went back down the hill, and the little girl stood in the sunset light and watched him.

13 The way home was long, and it was dark before the boy reached his father's house; but the lamplight and firelight shone through the windows, making them almost as bright as he had seen them from the hilltop; and when he opened the door, his mother came to kiss him, and his little sister ran to throw her arms about his neck, and his father looked up and smiled from his seat by the fire.

14 "Have you had a good day?" asked his mother.
Yes, the boy had had a very good day.
"And have you learned anything?" asked his father.
"Yes!" said the boy. "I have learned that our house has windows of gold and diamond."
41 Read this sentence from the story.

All day long the little boy worked hard, in field and barn and shed, for his people were poor farmers, and could not pay a workman; but at sunset there came an hour that was all his own, for his father had given it to him.


What does the author mean when she says “there came an hour that was all his own”?
A The boy had an hour in which to complete his tasks.

B The boy spent only an hour with his father each day.

C The boy was paid for only an hour of labor each day.

D The boy had an hour in which to rest from his chores.

42 Which detail of the story best supports the idea that the boy is imaginative?
A He nearly cries when he discovers clear glass in the windows.

B He thinks that his footprints on the road are walking along with him.

C He notices that the girl has hair as golden as the windows he had seen.

D He supposes that the windows darken because people close the shutters.
43 Which words best describe the boy?
A hopeful and bashful

B curious and courteous

C cheerful, but discouraged

D mischievous, but industrious

44 What is the difference between the boy’s arrival at the house with the golden windows and his arrival at his own house after his walk?

F When the boy arrives at the house with the golden windows, he is disappointed; but when he arrives at his own house, he is content.


G When the boy arrives at the house with the golden windows, he is ignored; but when he arrives at his own house, he is greeted warmly.

H The boy arrives at the house with the golden windows, determined to keep a secret, but he arrives at his own house hoping to learn a secret.

I The boy arrives at the house with the golden windows after the shutters have been closed, but he arrives at his own house while the shutters are still open.
45 What is the author’s main purpose for including the character of the girl in this story?
A to offer the boy someone to talk with him

B to present the boy with a different view of his own house

C to contrast the boy with someone who is satisfied with her life

D to provide the boy with a reason to visit the neighboring hilltop




Share with your friends:
:)


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2019
send message

    Main page

:)