Msc cover Page Unit Checklist – G4U7 Done?



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MSC Cover Page - Unit Checklist – G4U7

Done?

Task

Y

Incorporate field test comments

Y

Include NOAA inreach items – PR seals info

N/A

Include Dataviz links - L3, L4 (See notes below)

Y

Final Karen Umeda review – edits incorporated

Y

Received Science Background review

Y

Incorporate Science Background review comments




Case Study Added

N/A

Interactive designed(Not needed)

N/A

Interactive placed online and linked: (Not needed)



Video Piece placed online and linked


N/A

NOAA media resources linked

Y

Ocean Literacy Principle alignment

Y

Climate Literacy Principle alignment




National Standard Alignment

Y

Podcast linked: Lesson 3 linked in teacher preparation section and extended activities. 2/8/2010 (AG/SL)

Additional Edit activity/ies (listed below):

Y – 2/5

EarthSky Aulani link – teacher background, L3 chck

Y 1/12/2010

Internal PSC review and edits complete (SL)

Y 1/12/2010

Data viz map of MPA’s was for corals only. Found NOAA map of MPA’s in the U.S. Made sense to use this map since it aligned with content in lessons 3 & 4. Put this information in form of PowerPoint.





Interactive Request:


N/A









Grade 4 Unit 7


Marine Protected Areas



Grade 4 Unit 7


Marine Protected Areas


Grade 4


Unit 7
Marine Protected Areas

Table of Contents


Overview 1

Introduction 1

At A Glance 2


Benchmark Rubric 5

Science Background for the Teacher 7

NOAA Resources 13

Lesson 1 What Makes a Healthy Marine Ecosystem 15

Lesson 2 In What Ways Do Humans Impact Marine Ecosystems? 28

Lesson 3 What is a Marine Protected Area? 35

Lesson 4 Areas 42

Culminating Lesson 52


Grade 4 Unit 7

Overview

Marine Protected Areas

Introduction

Marine protected areas are important for the protection of coral reef habitats and the perpetuation of healthy ecosystems throughout the world. The practice of designating a marine protected area is often misunderstood by the general public; people often associate the creation of such areas, and associated governmental regulations, with total prohibition of human access and use of these areas. Although a few marine protected areas are designated no-access areas, most of them are simple cautionary measures designed to make the general public aware of the importance of having healthy ecosystems. Hawai‘i has its share of marine protected areas, but only one no-access area, the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Papahānaumokuākea. It is also one of the world’s largest marine protected areas.

Throughout this unit, students progressively become acquainted with marine habitats and fragile ecosystems and what they need to survive. They also learn about natural events such as wind, waves, storms, and tsunamis, which can severely impact marine habitats and disturb, and even destroy habitats and ecosystems. Although these effects can be devastating, they are not very frequent. Students also learn that human activities impact marine habitats and ecosystems because of over-fishing, water pollution, use of trawling fishing techniques, and many others. They also find that, although natural events cannot be prevented, impacts caused by humans can be somewhat curbed through the creation of marine protected areas.

As part of a marine protected area (MPA) research project, students select a MPA in the United States and, following extensive Internet searches, compile specifics about their selection, describe the MPA, and point out how the introduction of certain regulations might motivate people to use protected areas with care. Students then write a short report about their MPA that also includes a visual portion for posting on a gallery walk.

In culminating exercises, students review the information they compiled about healthy marine ecosystems during brainstorming, viewing of videos, completing student worksheets, contributing to classroom displays, and other sources. They are then asked to demonstrate their understanding of marine restricted areas by creating a marine protected area for the habitat they created, listing rules that should be applied, taking into account projected benefits, and anticipated public objections.



At A Glance


Each Lesson addresses HCPS III Benchmarks. The Lessons provide an opportunity for students to

move toward mastery of the indicated benchmarks.




ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

HCPS III BENCHMARKS

LESSON, Brief Summary, Duration

What makes a marine ecosystem healthy?

What are some natural events that impact marine ecosystems?





Science Standard 3: Life and Environmental Sciences:

SC.4.3.2: Describe how an organisms behavior is determined by its environment.




Lesson 1: What Makes a Healthy Marine Ecosystem?

Through a video, the internet and the creation of a brainstorming web students are introduced to marine ecosystems. By the end of this lesson students will be able to draw a healthy marine ecosystem with description of a threatened, protected, or endangered animal and explain why its habitat is important. The drawing will also include a description of the effects of natural events like storms, wind, waves, and tsunamis on these ecosystems.

Two 45-minute periods


How do humans impact marine ecosystems?

Science Standard 3: Life and Environmental Sciences:

SC.4.3.2: Describe how an organisms behavior is determined by its environment.



Lesson 2: In What Ways Do Humans Impact Marine Ecosystems?

The concept of how humans impact healthy marine ecosystems is introduced in this lesson by building on knowledge from the previous lesson. Students identify two major ways in which human beings impact marine ecosystems and give examples. Students augment their drawings of a healthy marine ecosystem with human impacts.


Two 45-minute periods


How do we protect our marine environments?

What is a marine protected area?




Science Standard 3: Life and Environmental Sciences:

SC.4.3.2: Describe how an organisms behavior is determined by its environment.




Lesson 3: What Is A Marine Protected Area?

Students are introduced to marine protected areas. In this lesson students will apply previous knowledge to understand why marine protected areas are necessary. To show what they have learned students will then add to the illustration created in Lesson 1 making sure to describe what a marine protected area consists of as well as how it will protect the organisms in their created ecosystem.


Two 45-minute periods

How do we decide the areas that need protection and the level of protection needed?

What is life like in a marine protected area?



Science Standard 3: Life and Environmental Sciences:

SC.4.3.2: Describe how an organisms behavior is determined by its environment.

Language Arts Standard 2: Reading Comprehension

LA 4.2.5: Summarize main points found in informational texts

Language Arts Standard 4: Writing: Conventions and Skills

LA 4.4.1: Write in a variety of grade-appropriate formats for a variety of purposes and audiences



Lesson 4: Marine Protected Areas All Over…

This lesson gives students a chance to independently explore a marine protected area in the United States and write a report about it for the class. The report includes a visual component.


One 45-minute period

Why is it important to create Marine Protected Areas?


Science Standard 3: Life and Environmental Sciences:

SC.4.3.2: Describe how an organisms behavior is determined by its environment.


Language Arts Standard 4: Writing: Conventions and Skills

LA 4.4.1: Write in a variety of grade-appropriate formats for a variety of purposes and audiences


Language Arts Standard 4: Writing: Conventions and Skills

LA 4.4.7: Write a simple bibliography entry for a book and website



Culminating Lesson: Creating a Marine Protected Area

Students demonstrate their knowledge of marine protected areas by creating point-of-view persuasive essays that focus on the class marine environment model. Students may also participate in a mock neighborhood board meeting where they share their points of view in oral presentations. From these essays, students will be able to design an MPA for the marine environments they created in Lesson 1.

Two 45-minute periods


Benchmark Rubric
I. HCPS III Benchmarks*

Below is a general Benchmark Rubric. Within each lesson, there are other assessment tools and additional rubrics specifically addressing the performance tasks of each lesson topic.




Topic

Interdependence

Benchmark SC.4.3.2

Describe how an organism's behavior is determined by its environment

Rubric

Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Explain and give examples of how different organisms' behaviors are determined by their environments

Describe how an organism's behavior is determined by its environment

Identify a way that an organism's behavior is influenced by its environment

Recognize that an organism's behavior is influenced by its environment




Topic

Constructing Meaning


Benchmark LA.4.2.5

Summarize main points found in informational texts

Rubric

Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Summarize the main points and describe their connection to the main idea or focus in informational texts 

Summarize the main points found in informational texts 

Produce a summary that mixes insignificant points with main points 

Summarize information not necessary to understanding the main points of informational texts, or repeat original text rather than summarize 




Topic

Range of Writing

Benchmark LA.4.4.1

Write in a variety of grade-appropriate formats for a variety of purposes and audiences, such as:
• narratives that follow a plot and describe a setting and characters
• poems that provide insight into why the topic is memorable
• responses to literature
• reports that focus on a central question and incorporate summaries from research

• accounts based on personal experience that have a clear focus and supporting details

• pieces to reflect on learning and to solve problems


Rubric

Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Insightfully adapt writing to grade- appropriate formats for a variety of purposes and audiences 

Adapt writing to grade-appropriate formats for a variety of purposes and audiences 

Write with some adaptation to grade-appropriate formats for a variety of purposes and audiences 

Write with little adaptation to grade-appropriate formats for a variety of purposes and audiences 




Topic

Citing Sources

Benchmark LA.4.4.7

Write a simple bibliography entry for a book and website (e.g., author, title, publisher, copyright)

Rubric

Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Write a simple bibliography entry, with accuracy and completeness 

Write a simple bibliography entry, with no significant errors 


Write a simple bibliography entry, with one or two missing elements or several errors in style 

Write a simple bibliography entry, with most elements missing or many errors in style 

Topic

Discussion and Presentation

Benchmark LA.4.6.2

Give short, informal presentations to inform or persuade

Rubric

Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Give creative, short, highly effective informal presentations to inform or persuade 

Give short, informal presentations to inform or persuade 

Give short, informal presentations that are somewhat informative or persuasive 

Give short, informal presentations that do not inform or persuade 




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