Music 008 Sample Syllabi mus 008: Legends, Folktales and Music Syllabus: Summer 2010



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Music 008 Sample Syllabi


MUS 008: Legends, Folktales and Music

Syllabus: Summer 2010
Class Meeting: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, 9am-12noon

Music Building Room 214


Instructor: Emily John

Email: ejharpist@aol.com

Office Hour by appointment


Course Goals

This course satisfies the PLAS AP requirement.


1. Students will learn standard music vocabulary and critical listening skills. Students will learn to identify, differentiate and quantify aspects of the elements of musical sound, such as melody, harmony, rhythm, form, texture, etc. They will learn to differentiate style and genre through guided listening.

2. Students will explore aspects of social and cultural history relevant to the musical examples studied.

3. Students will develop critical awareness relevant to the study of the literature of this course, and of styles of music in general.
Additional Course Objectives

1. Look at how music is experienced in culture and society

2. Explore aspects of social, economic and cultural history relevant to the musical examples studied

3. Survey the music literature and composers of Western classical music through the comparative study of different musical settings of famous myths, fairy tales and legends

4. Develop a greater sense of the interdisciplinary connections between literature and music
Required Texts: TBD

Additional readings and resources will be posted on Blackboard.

Attendance: Students are expected to attend all classes.

Class participation, which is 10% of your grade, requires attendance. In instances of illness, please provide a doctor’s note, explaining the absence.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is an EXTREMELY serious offense; any incident of plagiarism or academic dishonesty will result in a zero for that assignment. All work submitted must be your original work. ANY text or idea taken from an outside source, including websites, must be carefully cited. Any incorporation of another person’s work without acknowledging that person and/or source is plagiarism. For more information see http://qcpages.qc.cuny.edu/writing/history/plagiarism/index.html
Blackboard: Course materials, including the syllabus and course outline are posted on Blackboard. Additional readings may be posted to Blackboard. Students must have a Blackboard account for required reading and listening and regularly check it for course communications.
Classroom Etiquette: Remain in class for the duration of the class period. Refrain from eating during class. No cellphone use (including texting) during class. Please be sure your phone is silenced during the class period.
Evaluation:

10% Class Participation/Discussion

50% Final project/paper

25% Comparative Studies (2)

15% In-Class assignments
Course Content Overview:

Week 1 – Greek Mythology

Orpheus Myth – varied sources

Readings from Metamorphoses – Ovid

L’Orfeo Libretto – Striggio

First Nights: Five Musical Premieres – Thomas Forrest Kelly

Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo



Gluck Orphée et Euridice

Krenek Orpheus und Eurydike

Glass, Orpheé


Other Myths and their musical realizations

Purcell, Dido and Aeneas

Handel, Hercules

Brahms, Nänie

Strauss, Ariadne auf Naxos

Monteverdi, Lamento d’Arianna
Week 2-3 – Fairy Tales

Cinderella – Basile, Perrault, Grimm

Readings from Why Fairy Tales Stick – Jack Zipes

Spells of Enchantment: The Wondrous Fairy Tales of Western Culture – Edited by Jack Zipes

“Cinderella” – Perrault

“Aschenputtel” – Brothers Grimm

La Cenerentola libretto, translated by Chester Kalman

100 Great Operas and their Stories – Henry W. Simon

Prokofiev, Cinderella

Massenet, Cendrillon

Rossini, La Cenerentola

Holst, Cinderella

Rodgers and Hammerstein and Disney
Sleeping Beauty – Perrault, Grimm, and variants

Tchaikovsky, Sleeping Beauty



Ravel, Ma Mere L’Oye

Brahms, Dornroschen


Beauty and the Beast – Villeneuve, Beaumont,

compare to variants of Cupid and Psyche and East of the Sun, West of the Moon

Schafer, La Belle et la Bête

Glass, La Belle et la Bête

Ravel, Ma Mere L’Oye

Berners, Cupid and Psyche suite

Lully, Psyché


Others

Dvorak, Rusalka

Schumann, Märchenbilder

Ravel, Ma Mere L’Oye (Beauty and the Beast, Tom Thumb)

Week 3 Folklore

Russian Folklore/Tales –

Readings from Favorite Russian Fairy Tales – Arthur Ransome

Russian Fairy Tales – collected by Aleksandr Afanas’ev

Baba Yaga

Firebird

Musical Works

Stravinsky, Firebird

Mussorgsky, Pictures at an Exhibition(excerpts)

Prokofiev, Peter and the Wolf

Lyadov, Baba Yaga


Rimsky-Korsakov, Baba Yaga

1001 Nights – Richard Burton, translation

Rimsky-Korsakov, Scheherazade

Ravel, Shéhérazade


Final Projects

Students may choose from the works studied in class, and this additional list for their final project

Corigliano, Pied Piper Fantasy

Bartok, Bluebeard’s Castle

Humperdinck, Hansel and Gretel

Tchaikovsky, Swan Lake

Britten, Young Apollo

Zemlinsky, Die Seejunfrau (The Mermaid, The Little Mermaid)



César Cui, Puss and Boots

David Lang, The Little Match Girl Passion

Birtwistle, The Mask of Orpheus

BRITISH POP MUSIC OF THE 1960’s – MUS 008
Instructor: Eric Chernov email: chernove@ursatz.com

website: http://www.ursatz.com Office Hours: by appointment


class open forum address: british@lists.ursatz.com
This course satisfies the PLAS AP requirement.
Course Goals

1. Students will learn standard music vocabulary and critical listening skills. Students will learn to identify, differentiate and quantify aspects of the elements of musical sound, such as melody, harmony, rhythm, form, texture, etc. They will learn to differentiate style and genre through guided listening.

2. Students will explore aspects of social and cultural history relevant to the musical examples studied.

3. Students will develop critical awareness relevant to the study of the literature of this course, and of styles of music in general.

Material Covered

This course is intended as an introductory overview of the popular musical legacy of 1960’s Britain. We will examine the seminal works of such artists as The Beatles, The Who, The Kinks, The Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, The Yardbirds, Cream, Pink Floyd, and Small Faces, among others, and place their work within larger historical and social contexts.

Course material is presented in four forms: lectures (sometimes with handouts), class discussion, listening and reading assignments, and musical demonstrations. We will be listening to many recordings in class and watching a number of video presentations. You are responsible for all material, regardless of the medium of presentation. It is of utmost importance that you bring note paper to class and take notes. In the event that you are absent for a lecture, be sure to get the notes for the class from a classmate. You are responsible for all material, even in the event of your absence. Please note that homework assignments will be posted on my website in the “courses” section.

Contracts

This course requires the student sign an acknowledgement of adult content advisory warning as a condition of taking the class.


Dates

A detailed class outline of the course will be made available by the second class.


Supplies (bring with you to all classes)
Textbook: There will be no required textbook for this course. All required readings will be made available to the students by the instructor.
Recordings: Copies of all listening content will be made available to the students by the instructor.
Other: Note paper; pencil with eraser (Bring with you to each class)

(Staved music paper – also known as “manuscript paper” – is recommended, but not required).


You may not use writing implements other than pencils on quizzes or exams.

Quizzes or exams done in ink will not be marked and will receive a failing

grade.
Grading

Your final grade will be calculated as follows:

- Quizzes: 25% - Midterm examination: 25%

(Lectures, Films, Listening, etc.) - Final examination: 30%

- Class participation: 20%

MUSIC 008

The Year 1918

Summer 2010

Donna Doyle, Lecturer


This course satisfies the PLAS AP requirement.

Course Goals

1. Students will learn standard music vocabulary and critical listening skills. Students will learn to identify, differentiate and quantify aspects of the elements of musical sound, such as melody, harmony, rhythm, form, texture, etc. They will learn to differentiate style and genre through guided listening.

2. Students will explore aspects of social and cultural history relevant to the musical examples studied.

3. Students will develop critical awareness relevant to the study of the literature of this course, and of styles of music in general.

SYLLABUS OVERVIEW
The course will be organized into an introductory segment introducing the elements of music and pertinent vocabulary and listening techniques. This will be followed by segments covering trends in Europe and America, and a final segments providing an overview of those trends into the latter part of the 20th Century.
A detailed syllabus of all materials covered will be distributed by the second class meeting.
Part 1. The elements of musical sound and the ways in which they create style

Overview of cultural and music history leading up to 1918
Part 2. Trends in Europe in 1918

Romanticism - Rachmaninoff

Impressionism - Debussy and Ravel

Primitivism - Stravinsky, Bartok and Prokofiev

Atonality - Schoenberg, Berg and Webern

Neo-classicism - Stravinsky


Part 3. Trends in America in 1918

Ragtime - Scott Joplin

The Blues - Bessie Smith

Dixieland - Louis Armstrong

Broadway - George Gershwin

Experimentalism - Ives and Varese

Part 4. Overview of subsequent musical styles in the 20th century




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